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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Neil Henry Ritson, Mark M.J. Wilson and David A. Cohen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, at the industry level, the modes of governance used by multinational companies in the UK petrochemical industry to outsource…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, at the industry level, the modes of governance used by multinational companies in the UK petrochemical industry to outsource maintenance activities to engineering contractors. The study focusses on a form of novel governance structure called an Employer Panel (EP).

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies an inductive case study method to investigate the contractor governance mechanisms in 19 out of the 20 major petrochemical instillations located in the UK. Data included interviews, documentary and secondary evidence gathered from the cases and also industry bodies.

Findings

The study uncovered three distinct types of governance mode: market, managing contractor, and EP of contractors. The latter relies on the governance process of “mandated collaboration” to coordinate.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the focus on a particular industry, albeit an important one. The research implications include extending the empirical research into other sectors which use on-site contracted maintenance such as ship and aircraft manufacturing.

Practical implications

The EP structure with its mandated collaboration process is of value to managers of contractual relationships as it gives insights into coordinative process and it may provide an alternative model for managing outsourcing relationships.

Social implications

The mandated collaborative process requires clients to engage its contractors in longer term relationships, thus increasing corporate social responsibility and providing wider job security for contractor employees.

Originality/value

The EP mode, as far as can be ascertained, has not been addressed in the literature before.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Joshua Aboah, Mark M.J. Wilson, Karl M. Rich and Michael C. Lyne

The analysis of the concept of resilience in supply chain management studies mostly focuses on the downstream side of the value chain and tacitly assumes an unlimited…

1255

Abstract

Purpose

The analysis of the concept of resilience in supply chain management studies mostly focuses on the downstream side of the value chain and tacitly assumes an unlimited supply of raw materials. This assumption is unreasonable for agricultural value chains, as upstream disruptions clearly have a material impact on the availability of raw materials, and indeed, are a common source of supply problems. This paper aims to present a framework for the operationalisation of the concept of socioecological resilience in agricultural value chains that incorporates upstream activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A citation network analysis was adopted to review articles. A conceptual framework is then advanced to identify elements of resilience and indicators relevant to tropical agricultural value chains.

Findings

There are limited studies that assess resilience in the food chain context. Flexibility, collaboration, adaptability and resourcefulness are key elements for assessing resilience at the individual chain actor level. However, the paper argues that adaptability is the relevant element for the assessment of resilience at an aggregate food system level because it considers the alteration of a system’s state of resilience.

Practical implications

The proposed framework and propositions accommodate stakeholder interactions in the value chain and could serve as a tool to guide the assessment of resilience in agricultural value chains.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few to extend resilience to cover the socioecological interaction aspects for supply chains that yield the raw materials needed for continuity in channel-wide value creation processes.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2018

Mark M.J. Wilson, Peter Tatham, John Payne, Cécile L’Hermitte and Michael Shapland

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenges inherent in planning and responding to disaster events in a multi-agency context where numerous governmental and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the challenges inherent in planning and responding to disaster events in a multi-agency context where numerous governmental and non-governmental actors and agencies are involved in the planning and response phases. In particular, the authors examine a situation where a lead agency has recently been delegated the responsibility for emergency relief logistics and how it might determine and implement best practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting an iterative inductive approach, the authors gather data and insights from academic literature, emergency management policies, frameworks and documents and exploratory in-depth interviews with 12 key informants who have considerable experience with the challenges of logistic preparation and response to disasters in a developed country context. The data and context are limited to developed counties, especially the state of Queensland, Australia.

Findings

The authors discuss the challenge of achieving coordinated supply chain management where mandated/lead response agencies are required to meet stakeholder and local community expectations and outcomes. From these findings, the authors offer 11 practical recommendations to assist the delivery of best practice in emergency logistics.

Originality/value

Humanitarian logistics is usually examined from a low/middle-income country perspective, yet an efficient and effective disaster response is no less important for developed economies. In this respect, the authors offer a fresh examination of the challenges of delivering best practice for emergency logistics in order to achieve expected community outcomes.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Mark M.J. Wilson and Robert W. Goddard

The wine industry of New Zealand has rapidly developed and matured in the last decade to produce an international product that is highly desired by key global markets, and…

Abstract

The wine industry of New Zealand has rapidly developed and matured in the last decade to produce an international product that is highly desired by key global markets, and has become a major contributor to the economy. However, limited productive capacity, and macroeconomic forces have contrived to constrain the global marketing opportunities, essentially forcing New Zealand wines into niche markets. These forces include: global market forces, technological forces, global cost forces, and socio‐political macro‐economic forces. The impact of these forces are analysed in this article. Several analytical tools borrowed from ‘lean manufacturing’ are used to construct a conceptual value chain map of the generic industry. A key concept for success that will be a challenge to industry participants is to create and deliver ‘value’ in the minds of the final consumer. This can be achieved by mapping/measuring the value generated in different parts of the supply chain while still allowing for the synergies generated by the whole system.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Mark M.J. Wilson, Ian A. MacDonald and Monnane M. Monnane

The purpose of this study is to examine three governance structures (market, contract and vertical integration) that are commonly used to coordinate procurement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine three governance structures (market, contract and vertical integration) that are commonly used to coordinate procurement relationships between grape growers and winemakers in the wine industry. This paper aims to adopt a multi-theoretical approach combining transaction cost and relational exchange theories to explore the influence that trust and a state’s legal system have on the choice of governance mechanism. The authors propose arguing that, in the absence of an efficient legal system, trust must exist between parties to facilitate the pervasive use of contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical results are derived from mail survey responses of 111 South African and 116 New Zealand wineries. These two countries were selected because of the variances in the efficiencies of their legal systems. Multiple regression models were used to investigate the importance that parties place on trust and the legal system when considering the use of incomplete contracts to govern supply chain relationships that are characterised by high asset specificity and high uncertainty.

Findings

It was found that contracts are frequently used to govern transactions in both countries, and that trust between parties is an effective substitute for an efficient legal system in governing contractual relations. Specifically, it was found that trust between parties is the major motivating factor for the use of contracts in South Africa, overcoming the weakness of the legal system, while reliance on the legal system to enforce contracts underpins the New Zealand industry.

Originality/value

This study offers a direct cross-country comparison drawn from a population study of two major wine-producing countries that has not been attempted before. In the three models, measures were included to capture the effectiveness of a state’s legal system to extend the governance literature.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Mark M.J. Wilson and Ram N. Roy

Gaining access to the cost savings and production efficiencies derived from lowering inventories in the supply chain is as vital for small‐to medium‐sized enterprises…

5659

Abstract

Purpose

Gaining access to the cost savings and production efficiencies derived from lowering inventories in the supply chain is as vital for small‐to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) as they are for larger manufacturing firms. Lean procurement as a concept has been advanced as a method for achieving this. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a method of addressing some of the critical barriers to implementing lean procurement methodologies in an SME environment through the application of procurement consolidation techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

First the relevant theoretical and practitioner literature is reviewed, a theoretical consolidation model is developed, and a worked example is presented.

Findings

The barriers face by SMEs trying to implement a lean procurement philosophy are significant. Low volumes, small lot sizes and high frequency purchases incur significant additional distribution costs. The paper argues that the use of a double freight consolidation model (DFCM) is useful to SMEs for maximising the trade‐offs between volume and frequency in an international supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst this research suggests that SMEs can indeed use the DFCM for lean procurement, the next step is to apply the model in practice.

Originality/value

This paper synthesises consolidation modelling and lean procurement principles. This synthesis is further enhanced by applying a simulated example to the challenging SME environment. The application of the categorisation of both buyers and vendors to the consolidation model is novel.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Edward J.S. Hearnshaw and Mark M.J. Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to advance supply chain network theory by applying theoretical and empirical developments in complex network literature to the context of…

11699

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance supply chain network theory by applying theoretical and empirical developments in complex network literature to the context of supply chains as complex adaptive systems. The authors synthesize these advancements to gain an understanding of the network properties underlying efficient supply chains. To develop a suitable theory of supply chain networks, the authors look to mirror the properties of complex network models with real‐world supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review complex network literature drawn from multiple disciplines in top scientific journals. From this interdisciplinary review a series of propositions are developed around supply chain complexity and adaptive phenomena.

Findings

This paper proposes that the structure of efficient supply chains follows a “scale‐free” network. This proposal emerges from arguments that the key properties of efficient supply chains are a short characteristic path length, a high clustering coefficient and a power law connectivity distribution.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' discussion centres on applying advances found in recent complex network literature. Hence, the need is noted to empirically validate the series of propositions developed in this paper in a supply chain context.

Practical implications

If efficient supply chains resemble a scale‐free network, then managers can derive a number of implications. For example, supply chain resilience is derived by the presence of hub firms. To reduce the vulnerability of supply chains to cascading failures, it is recognized that managers could build in redundancy, undertake a multi‐sourcing strategy or intermediation between hub firms.

Originality/value

This paper advances supply chain network theory. It offers a novel understanding of supply chains as complex adaptive systems and, in particular, that efficient and resilient supply chain systems resemble a scale‐free network. In addition, it provides a series of propositions that allow modelling and empirical research to proceed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Nicholas Beaumont

719

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2021

Aaditya Jain, Saket Shanker and Akhilesh Barve

The hotel and tourism industry forms a crucial economic sector for all the economies around the world. However, it suffered the worst hit during the COVID-19 outbreak…

Abstract

Purpose

The hotel and tourism industry forms a crucial economic sector for all the economies around the world. However, it suffered the worst hit during the COVID-19 outbreak. Considering the hotel and tourism sector's critical situation, this manuscript aims to emphasise the importance of resilience in the hotel and tourism supply chain (HTSC) and explores the crucial barriers that tend to disturb the inculcation of stability in the hotel and tourism sector. The present research analyses the factors influencing the hotel and tourism sector's resilience and also takes into consideration the various critical success factors (CSFs) needed to build a resilient HTSC.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-phase research approach has been proposed and used in this study. In the first phase, eight CSFs and sixteen factors influencing the hotel and tourism sector's resilience during the COVID-19 pandemic were identified. The basis of the identification of the CSFs and factors was literature and inputs received from experts. In the second phase, the grey-Entropy-EDAS, a qualitative and quantitative analysis, was used to analyse the identified CSFs and factors to determine the priority of concern.

Findings

In this research, the most imperative facet influencing the hotel and tourism sector's resilience has been identified, and the findings will assist hotel and tourism sector in managing and mitigating the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic. The analysis of the results indicates that out of all the critical success factors, supply chain visibility is the most crucial aspect in building HTSC's resilience, whereas economic catastrophe is the most influential factor. Sensitivity analysis is also conducted to examine the priority ranking stability.

Practical implications

The results of this study can be used by the hotel supply chain managers and policymakers to plan for various challenges faced by them as they try to implement resilience-based strategies in their supply chain.

Originality/value

This research is unique as it analyses the general factors hindering the pathway of resilience in the hotel and tourism supply chain. This is also the first kind of study that has used grey-Entropy to analyse the critical success factors and grey-EDAS for analysing the impact of various factors influencing the hotel and tourism sector's resilience.

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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