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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1913

We have observed in the reports of those engaged in the administration of the Acts several references to the practice of milking so that a portion of the milk is left in the udder…

Abstract

We have observed in the reports of those engaged in the administration of the Acts several references to the practice of milking so that a portion of the milk is left in the udder of the cow, this portion being removed subsequently and not included in the milk sent out to customers. The inspector for the southern division of the county of Northampton reports that on a sample of milk being found deficient in fat to the extent of 17 per cent., a further sample was taken at the time of milking when a milkman was found to be not properly “stripping” the cows. He was warned. The analyst for the county of Notts writes: “The first strippings obtained before the milk glands have been normally excited by the milking are very low in fat yet are “genuine” milk in the sense that nothing has been added to or taken from it. It is nonsense to talk of genuine milk in the sense that everything that comes from the udder of the cow is to be taken as genuine milk fit for sale.” In a case tried before the Recorder of Middlesbrough, one witness said that among some farmers it was a common practice not to “strip” cows until after the milk was sent away.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Mark Jenkins

In the United States research undertaken by Birch (1979) produced the notable finding that firms employing fewer than 20 employees accounted for 66% of all net new jobs in the US…

Abstract

In the United States research undertaken by Birch (1979) produced the notable finding that firms employing fewer than 20 employees accounted for 66% of all net new jobs in the US between 1969 and 1976. The publication of this study combined with the development of the UK ‘enterprise culture’ (Kirby and Mullen, 1991) led to an impetus for further research in the UK which has been well chronicled by Curran (1986). Birch's findings have, to a certain extent, been replicated in the UK with Doyle and Gallagher (1986) noting that approximately one million jobs were created through small firms and self employment from 1982 to 1984. In a European context Storey and Johnson's review of the European research on job generation (Storey and Johnson, 1987a) noted that, with only one exception, small firms experienced positive employment growth, whereas larger firms suffered a loss on employment.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1990

Mark Jenkins and K. Sara Harrison

Considers the focus group as an alternative to the traditionalstructured questionnaire. Their appeal, what they can and cannotachieve, and four key questions related to conducting…

2501

Abstract

Considers the focus group as an alternative to the traditional structured questionnaire. Their appeal, what they can and cannot achieve, and four key questions related to conducting focus groups are discussed. Focus groups are relevant to a broad spectrum of marketing issues related to the food industry, and it is concluded that their role will continue to dominate qualitative market research. Increasingly high standards will be demanded of moderators, perhaps leading to recognised qualifications for the holding of focus groups.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Véronique Ambrosini, Nardine Collier and Mark Jenkins

In this paper the aim is to concentrate on the impact that various types and combinations of knowledge can have on firms.

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper the aim is to concentrate on the impact that various types and combinations of knowledge can have on firms.

Design/methodology/approach

After a review of the literature the authors conceptually configure the extant understanding of knowledge over eight configurations. They illustrate each configuration with practical examples.

Findings

This configurational approach provides a basis for identifying potential complementarities and conflicts regarding the dynamics of organisational knowledge in competitive settings. It allows for a better understanding of knowledge in organisations and its link with competitive advantage.

Practical implications

The authors' argument can be used by managers to help them think of how knowledge is configured within their firm. By doing so they might better understand how this knowledge configuration might give them a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This paper uses some traditional knowledge concepts but by proposing to take a configurational view of organisational knowledge, it proposes an original and meaningful way of examining the role of knowledge in the generation and sustainability of competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Mark Jenkins and Malcolm McDonald

The study of how organizations segment their markets has traditionally taken a prescriptive and analytical approach. More recently, a number of academics and practitioners have…

6483

Abstract

The study of how organizations segment their markets has traditionally taken a prescriptive and analytical approach. More recently, a number of academics and practitioners have voiced concerns over the evident gap between how such concepts are viewed in theory and how they are applied in practice. These issues have already been raised in academic papers, but almost entirely at an abstract level. Introduces a more concrete aspect to the debate by proposing a series of organizational archetypes which illustrate how organizations may segment their markets in practice. These archetypes are developed from a series of mini‐case studies which provide a basis for understanding how organizations may interface with the market at both an explicit and implicit level. Discusses the implications for both academic research and organizational practice.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Andrew McAuley

381

Abstract

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2022

Minhajul Islam Ukil and Anna Jenkins

Despite entrepreneurial intentions being a central and enduring construct in entrepreneurship research, most research on intentions focused on factors that underpin an…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite entrepreneurial intentions being a central and enduring construct in entrepreneurship research, most research on intentions focused on factors that underpin an individual's entrepreneurial intentions. This study extends the emerging literature on fear of failure and resilience to understand how they influence entrepreneurial intentions. The authors do this in a context where job prospects are low, and unemployment is high to understand what potentially prevents educated youth in a developing country from pursuing self-employment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the structural equation modelling (SEM) using AMOS 25 to test the hypotheses on a sample of 238 third- and fourth-year Bangladeshi students facing an important career decision. A replication study is also conducted with an additional sample (n = 209) to verify the robustness of the findings, using a different measurement of resilience and a different analysis method – partial least square (PLS)-SEM in Smart-PLS 3.

Findings

The study finds support for the mediation model where fear of failure mediates the relationship between resilience and entrepreneurial intentions. The findings suggest that resilience enhances entrepreneurial intentions while also reducing the negative effects of fear of failure on entrepreneurial intentions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to an underexplored area of entrepreneurial intentions literature by exploring how resilience relates to fear of failure and entrepreneurial intentions. The findings demonstrate the importance of resilience through its direct effect on intentions as well as its indirect effect through its influence on fear of failure. The findings have implications for potential entrepreneurs and educational institutions providing training in entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1968

“FORMAL classes on how to use a library would be an insult to the intelligence of the student.” This was an extreme reply mentioned in the Report of the Committee on Libraries…

45

Abstract

“FORMAL classes on how to use a library would be an insult to the intelligence of the student.” This was an extreme reply mentioned in the Report of the Committee on Libraries, with reference to a questionnaire to academic staff about instruction in library use. This view of the teaching activities of librarians with students must be familiar to all librarians whether they are concerned with formal teaching activities or not. Nevertheless it is suggested that, in the current climate of change in the nature of sixth form studies, and the need for bibliographic training as part of a general education leading to informed library users in the academic and professional world, there is now a strong case for an examined course of study at “A” level G.C.E. incorporating the principles of bibliographical knowledge for users.

Details

New Library World, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Rebecca Coombes

36

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 April 2023

Nicola Capolupo

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurial Learning Evolutions in Startup Hubs: A Post-Pandemic Perspective for Lean Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-070-0

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