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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Alan J. Gilmer, Mark J. McGarrity and Vivienne Byers

The purpose of this paper is to determine the status of policy design and policy implementation in the biofuel sector in Ireland. The focus of the work addresses the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the status of policy design and policy implementation in the biofuel sector in Ireland. The focus of the work addresses the overarching operational context of the biofuel sector in Ireland and the role of different actors in shaping and resolving inconsistencies in policy outlook and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative research approach involving a series of semi-structured interviews with members of the relevant sub-groups concerned. This study sought to address two questions – whether current or proposed policy is likely to affect consumption of indigenous biofuel feedstocks in the biofuel sector and what are the controlling factors in the demand for indigenous feedstocks for biofuel.

Findings

Outcomes suggest that while Irish government policy recognises the need to support the development of renewable energy, it also operates under a number of parallel and potentially inconsistent paradigms in relation to biofuels as a renewable energy commodity. It is contended that the outcome of this position is a lack of coherent and coordinated policy in the area of biofuel production, including second generation biofuel using indigenous feedstocks.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new cross sectoral perspective on the status of biofuel policy in Ireland with particular reference to second generation biofuel feedstocks. It focuses analysis on the nature of policy-operational inconsistencies and the need for a deeper ecological perspective in governance.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Maman Ali M. Moustapha, Qian Yu and Benjamin Adjei Danqauh

The purpose of this paper is to assess how the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) renewable energy policy (EREP) affects energy intensity using the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess how the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) renewable energy policy (EREP) affects energy intensity using the difference-in-difference (DID) and the propensity score matching methods (PSM). Based on the current debates on renewable energy policies (REP) and due to the fact that energy efficiency has been a challenge for ECOWAS member states. The authors set up a framework to assess the EREP effect on energy intensity.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the DID and PSM approaches the paper assesses the effect of EREP on energy intensity. The following three different paths are considered: Path 1 tests the EREP effect on electricity access. Path 2 tests the use of renewable energy sources as a factor to enhance the energy intensity. Path 3 tests whether or not use of renewable energy deployment has the potential to raise the total percentage of primary energy supply. The principle is to investigate if and to what extend the EREP increases the energy intensity.

Findings

The results indicate that EREP has a significantly positive effect on increasing the percentage of energy intensity in ECOWAS member states that has implemented the policy, resulting for a large percentage of the population to electricity access in treated groups. Empirical estimation results largely corroborate the three paths’ hypotheses. The result indicated that the EREP has increased the percentage of electricity access throughout the region.

Originality/value

The paper explores a more appropriate framework to examine the effect of EREP and enriches the literature on the impact of REP by combining a policy evaluation approach (PSM-DID) method. This paper is the first to the knowledge to estimate the EREP effect by using a non-parametric approach. The majority of previous studies have focused on using case studies, exploratory analysis approaches and econometric methods.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Joseph P. McGarrity, James A. Bell and James E. Barr

To date, Congressional ideology has been considered to be the portion of a roll call vote that could not be explained by self‐interested behavior. This paper suggests that…

Abstract

To date, Congressional ideology has been considered to be the portion of a roll call vote that could not be explained by self‐interested behavior. This paper suggests that the scope of what is considered self‐interested behavior must be expanded. We find evidence that Congressmen may be the agent in a principal agent relationship, not only to voters and PACs as commonly thought, but also to industries that may offer Congressmen employment when they leave the House.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Christos Boukalas

The sudden rise of the socio-political importance of security that has marked the twenty-first century entails a commensurate empowerment of the intelligence apparatus…

Abstract

The sudden rise of the socio-political importance of security that has marked the twenty-first century entails a commensurate empowerment of the intelligence apparatus. This chapter takes the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 as a vantage point from where to address the political significance of this development. It provides an account of the powers the Act grants intelligence agencies, concluding that it effectively legalizes their operational paradigm. Further, the socio-legal dynamics that informed the Act lead the chapter to conclude that Intelligence has become a dominant apparatus within the state. This chapter pivots at this point. It seeks to identify, first, the reasons of this empowerment; and, second, its effects on liberal-democratic forms, including the rule of law. The key reason for intelligence empowerment is the adoption of a pre-emptive security strategy, geared toward neutralizing threats that are yet unformed. Regarding its effects on liberal democracy, the chapter notes the incompatibility of the logic of intelligence with the rule of law. It further argues that the empowerment of intelligence pertains to the rise of a new threat-based governmental logic. It outlines the core premises of this logic to argue that they strengthen the anti-democratic elements in liberalism, but in a manner that liberalism is overcome.

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1925

We issue a double Souvenir number of The Library World in connection with the Library Association Conference at Birmingham, in which we have pleasure in including a…

Abstract

We issue a double Souvenir number of The Library World in connection with the Library Association Conference at Birmingham, in which we have pleasure in including a special article, “Libraries in Birmingham,” by Mr. Walter Powell, Chief Librarian of Birmingham Public Libraries. He has endeavoured to combine in it the subject of Special Library collections, and libraries other than the Municipal Libraries in the City. Another article entitled “Some Memories of Birmingham” is by Mr. Richard W. Mould, Chief Librarian and Curator of Southwark Public Libraries and Cuming Museum. We understand that a very full programme has been arranged for the Conference, and we have already published such details as are now available in our July number.

Details

New Library World, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Abstract

Details

Panel Data Econometrics Theoretical Contributions and Empirical Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-836-0

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Joseph P. McGarrity

This paper aims to examine why a legislature would repeal an interest group deal. Design/methodology/approach–This paper provides a case study of the House of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine why a legislature would repeal an interest group deal. Design/methodology/approach–This paper provides a case study of the House of Representatives’ roll call reversal on the Brady Bill. The House voted against the Brady Bill in 1988 giving a victory to pro‐gun interest groups. It then reversed itself and voted for the Brady Bill in 1993.

Findings

This paper finds that changes in the democratic party leadership may be responsible for the House's policy reversal on gun control.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that in a principal–agent relationship, the agent has some discretion. In this case, the principal (elected members of a party in the US House) hires an agent (its leadership) to organize their teamwork to produce legislative output. The leadership has some discretion in making interest group deals.

Originality/value

The paper shows how changes in leadership reduce the durability of interest group deals.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1924

WITH this issue we are commencing the twenty‐seventh year of our career as an independent Library Journal and trust that we shall carry on the tradition of our illustrious…

Abstract

WITH this issue we are commencing the twenty‐seventh year of our career as an independent Library Journal and trust that we shall carry on the tradition of our illustrious founder and continue to criticise or praise without fear or favour. During the past twelve months our editorial staff has successfully produced special numbers dealing with Bookbinding, Book Selection, Children's Departments, Classification, and Colonial Libraries. Judging by the correspondence we have received, our efforts have been greatly appreciated by the majority of our readers. Naturally we have not pleased everybody and we have even been dubbed the “little contemporary” in some quarters. However, we can point to an unbroken record of twenty‐six years' endeavour to serve the library profession and we ourselves are justly proud of the contemptible “little contemporary” that did not cease to appear even during the darkest hours of the dread war period.

Details

New Library World, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Joseph P. McGarrity

The purpose of this paper is to examine how firms respond to adverse supply shocks.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how firms respond to adverse supply shocks.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines a supply shock within the framework of Mankiw's Menu Cost Model.

Findings

The analysis in this paper illustrates that the type of adverse shock is important. An immediate increase in the money supply may work well in response to a negative aggregate demand shock, but be counter‐productive in response to a negative supply shock. This paper finds that output will decrease when the Federal Reserve increases the money supply in response to an adverse supply shock.

Practical implications

The implication is that when the Federal Reserve first spots a negative supply shock (such as an increase in oil prices), it should not immediately respond with an increase in the money supply. Doing so might cause a recession.

Originality/value

When there is a negative supply shock, conventional wisdom holds that an increase in money supply can offset the decrease in output that would occur without a policy response. That is, increases in money supply have the exact opposite influence that most economists often suppose.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Jonathan Ivy

The purpose of this paper is to present a new marketing mix based on MBA students' attitudes and opinions towards the marketing initiatives of business schools in South…

61244

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a new marketing mix based on MBA students' attitudes and opinions towards the marketing initiatives of business schools in South Africa. The post‐graduate business education market is, and increasingly, getting more aggressive in their efforts to attract students on to their flagship degree, the MBA. The traditional marketing tools historically grouped into 4Ps (product, price, place and promotion), 5Ps (adding people) and 7Ps (adding physical facilities and processes) may be wanting in this market.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken was a quantitative survey of students registered at state subsidized universities in South Africa.

Findings

The factor analysed data showed seven quite distinct underlying factors in the marketing activities of these business schools, some covering the same elements of the traditional marketing mix: people, promotion, and price. There were, however, four different elements: programme, prominence, prospectus, and premiums.

Research limitations/implications

While the survey included only MBA students from a sample drawn in South Africa, the study does highlight the fact that the traditional services marketing mix may not be as useful to the higher education sector as it might have been originally thought.

Practical implications

The development of marketing strategy may be better served by this 7P model rather than the services mix.

Originality/value

This paper presents the underlying factors that form the basis of a new marketing mix specifically for MBA recruitment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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