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Article

Howard Johnson

“Companies, particularly those which sell goods or services direct to the public, regard their trade marks (whether brand names or pictorial symbols) as being among their…

Abstract

“Companies, particularly those which sell goods or services direct to the public, regard their trade marks (whether brand names or pictorial symbols) as being among their most valuable assets. It is important therefore for a trading nation such as the United Kingdom to have a legal framework for the protection of trade marks which fully serves the needs of industry and commerce. The law governing registered trade marks is however fifty years old and has to some extent lost touch with the marketplace. Moreover it causes some of the procedures associated with registration to be more complicated than they need be.” This introductory paragraph to the Government's recent White Paper on “Reform of Trade Marks Law” indicates that reform is in the air. The primary pressure for reform has emanated from Brussels with the need to harmonise national trade mark laws before the advent of the Single European market on 1st January 1993. To this end the Council of Ministers adopted a harmonisation directive in December 1988 which must be translated into the national laws of member states by 28th December 1991.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article

Katalin Ujhelyi, Jerome Carson and Mark Holland

Positive psychology is an area of rapid development in mainstream psychology, yet it has had little impact thus far in the field of dual diagnosis (DD). Effective…

Abstract

Purpose

Positive psychology is an area of rapid development in mainstream psychology, yet it has had little impact thus far in the field of dual diagnosis (DD). Effective treatment for clients with DD is limited, due to the lack of all-encompassing interventions that treat the two conditions simultaneously. The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to discover the prevalence of DD among users of selected drug services in Manchester; second, to explore differences between DD clients and those with substance use in hope, resilience, and well-being; and third, to identify predictors of hope, resilience, and well-being in this population.

Design/methodology/approach

The Snyder Hope Scale, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, and the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale were administered to 113 users of drug services through a convenience sampling method.

Findings

Findings from this preliminary investigation indicated that the DD group were more vulnerable as they were less hopeful, less resilient, and had poorer well-being than their counterparts.

Practical implications

This population of clients might benefit from specialized integrated treatment facilitating hope and resilience, which in turn would improve their well-being.

Originality/value

The present study addresses a gap in the literature. Although the above positive psychological aspects have been looked at in relation to mental health, and in relation to addiction, the current research explores these positive dimensions with regard to the co-occurrence of substance abuse and mental illness.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Article

Katalin Ujhelyi Gomez, Jerome Carson, Gill Brown and Mark Holland

Positive psychology (PP) interventions have been suggested to be beneficial in the treatment of dual diagnosis (DD). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Positive psychology (PP) interventions have been suggested to be beneficial in the treatment of dual diagnosis (DD). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perspective of psychosocial intervention (PSI) workers to explore the potential of a positive strengths-based approach in DD recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was employed with PSI workers who attended and observed a positive intervention delivered to DD clients. A focus group explored what these practitioners are already doing that resembles PP and their opinion regarding the utility of such interventions in recovery.

Findings

Findings revealed that practitioners were already engaging in positive practice, however, randomly and infrequently with limited impact. Although this new approach was found valuable, potential challenges were identified and a possible discrepancy between staff views of clients and clients’ views of themselves in terms of their potential was detected.

Research limitations/implications

The study involved a small and homogeneous sample. Further research is necessary to investigate staff views and ways of integrating PP with traditional treatment.

Practical implications

Rather than merely attending to the psychological problems and dealing with symptoms, it is also necessary to directly target well-being to enable people to flourish with consideration of their readiness to change.

Originality/value

Addressing a gap in the literature, the present study explored positive themes in current practice and forms part of the evaluation of a newly developed strengths-based approach for individuals with coexisting problems.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Article

Chris Procter and Mark Kozak-Holland

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the contemporary relevance of the management of the Great Pyramid of Giza project.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the contemporary relevance of the management of the Great Pyramid of Giza project.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses evidence from the literature from many disciplines concerning both the objectives and construction of the pyramid. It relates this to recent discussion concerned with the issues faced in megaproject management, which are core to the discussion of success and failure.

Findings

The analysis shows the significance of the “break-fix model” of megaproject management and how having a sequence of megaprojects builds management through a learning process. It demonstrates the significance of innovation arising from the experience of previous projects in solving major technical challenges and illustrates the importance of the organisation and ethical management of a substantial workforce.

Research limitations/implications

There is very limited reliable documentary evidence from the time of the construction of Giza (c.2560 BCE). Many sources concerning ancient Egypt are still widely contested. However, the use of research from a combination of disciplines demonstrates the relevance of the project and the importance of learning from history to contemporary project management.

Originality/value

The authors believe that this is the first paper to analyse the Giza pyramid project from a project management perspective. This was arguably the most significant construction project of ancient history and the paper explains the lessons, which can be learned, which are very significant to today’s megaprojects.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Case study

Timothy Harper, Barbara Norelli, Melanie Brandston and Mary Taber

Micro organizational behavior – an individual level of analysis (i.e. motivation, personality, attitudes, learning, etc.). Meso organizational behavior – team/group level…

Abstract

Purpose

Micro organizational behavior – an individual level of analysis (i.e. motivation, personality, attitudes, learning, etc.). Meso organizational behavior – team/group level of analysis (i.e. communication, team dynamics, power, politics, etc.). Macro organizational behavior – an organizational level of analysis (i.e. strategy, structure, culture, control, etc.). Marketplace or external environment (PESTEL analysis).

Research methodology

The research was conducted by a consultant in the role of a participant-observer.

Case overview/synopsis

The focus of the case is a disguised nonprofit organization, the American-Netherlands Foundation (AmNet), based in Chicago. The organization faced leadership and organizational challenges related to conflicting strategic and operational priorities among the board of trustees, the president and staff. An unexpected contribution of $750,000 increased the salience of these differences. The case provides students an excellent opportunity to apply their analytical skills and knowledge gained in a management and business course.

Complexity academic level

Organizational behavior; organizational design; organizational development; and organizational theory. Levels – upper-level undergraduate through first-year MBA students.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

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Article

Patricia V. Roehling, Mark V. Roehling, Ashli Brennan, Ashley R. Drew, Abbey J. Johnston, Regina G. Guerra, Ivy R. Keen, Camerra P. Lightbourn and Alexis H. Sears

The purpose of this paper is to use data from the 2008 and 2012 US Senate elections to examine the relationship between candidate size (obese, overweight, normal weight…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use data from the 2008 and 2012 US Senate elections to examine the relationship between candidate size (obese, overweight, normal weight) and candidate selection and election outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using pictures captured from candidate web sites, participants rated the size of candidates in the primary and general US Senate elections. χ2 analyses, t-tests and hierarchical multiple regressions were used to test for evidence of bias against overweight and obese candidates and whether gender and election information moderate that relationship.

Findings

Obese candidates were largely absent from the pool of candidates in both the primary and general elections. Overweight women, but not overweight men, were also underrepresented. Supporting our hypothesis that there is bias against overweight candidates, heavier candidates tended to receive lower vote share than their thinner counterparts, and the larger the size difference between the candidates, the larger the vote share discrepancy. The paper did not find a moderating effect for gender or high-information high vs low-information elections on the relationship between candidate size and vote share.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to understand the process by which obese candidates are culled from the candidate pool and the cognitions underlying the biases against overweight candidates.

Social implications

Because of the bias against obese political candidates, as much as one-third of the adult US population are likely to be excluded or being elected to a major political office.

Originality value

This study is the first to use election data to examine whether bias based on size extends to the electoral process.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article

Mark Holland

The purpose of this paper is to show how early newspapers have become ever more essential sources for the study of “history from below”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how early newspapers have become ever more essential sources for the study of “history from below”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at why back runs of newspapers are an unrivalled primary source for students, authors, and researchers.

Findings

Historians of all kinds now have access to a much expanded range of newspaper titles. The complete run of The Economist has been completed; the newspaper digitisation programme of the British Library has already recovered over three million pages from hundreds of titles from the restoration to the end of the nineteenth century. More than a million pages of the Guardian/Observer files are now appearing online, and the complete edition of The Illustrated London News will be published in the spring of 2009.

Originality/value

The paper describes the modern technology advances have made possible the creation of this great corpus of historical newspapers.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article

Patricia V. Roehling, Mark V. Roehling, Jeffrey D. Vandlen, Justin Blazek and William C. Guy

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether overweight and obese individuals are underrepresented among top female and male US executives and whether there is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether overweight and obese individuals are underrepresented among top female and male US executives and whether there is evidence of greater discrimination against overweight and obese female executives than male executives.

Design/methodology/approach

Estimates of the frequencies of overweight and obese male Fortune 100 CEOs and female Fortune 1000 CEOs were obtained using publicly available photographs and raters with demonstrated expertise in evaluating body weight. These “experts” then estimated whether the pictured CEOs were normal weight, overweight or obese.

Findings

Based upon our expert raters’ judgments, it is estimated that between 5 and 22 per cent of US top female CEOs are overweight and approximately 5 per cent are obese. Compared to the general US population, overweight and obese women are significantly underrepresented in among top female CEOs. Among top male CEOs, it is estimated that between 45 and 61 per cent are overweight and approximately 5 per cent are obese. Compared to the general population overweight men are overrepresented among top CEOs, whereas obese men are underrepresented. This demonstrates that weight discrimination occurs at the highest levels of career advancement and that the threshold for weight discrimination is lower for women than for men.

Practical implications

Weight discrimination appears to add to the glass ceiling effect for women, and may serve as a glass ceiling for obese men.

Originality/value

This paper uses field data, as opposed to laboratory data, to demonstrate that discrimination against the overweight and obese extends to the highest levels of employment.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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Article

Ian Wilson, Mark Holland, Vanessa Mason, Josh Reeve and Hayley Ash

As the use of drugs and alcohol by clients accessing mental health services becomes increasingly common, members of staff working within psychiatric inpatient areas often…

Abstract

As the use of drugs and alcohol by clients accessing mental health services becomes increasingly common, members of staff working within psychiatric inpatient areas often encounter drug and alcohol misuse among their client group. The safe and effective management of this issue has become a priority for many inpatient services. This paper outlines a policy for the management of substance misuse on psychiatric inpatient wards developed by Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust. The fundamental principles underpinning the policy are highlighted, and the key sections of the policy are described. There is a detailed description of how the policy has been applied in practice by members of staff working on inpatient wards, with clinical examples being presented.

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Article

Christian Guest and Mark Holland

The term “dual diagnosis” has been widely accepted as referring to co‐existing mental illness and substance misuse. However, it is clear from the literature that…

Abstract

Purpose

The term “dual diagnosis” has been widely accepted as referring to co‐existing mental illness and substance misuse. However, it is clear from the literature that individuals with these co‐existing difficulties continue to be excluded from mainstream mental health services. The term “dual diagnosis” can be pejorative and therefore, complicate or obstruct engagement. It is argued within this paper that the association between mental illness and substance misuse (including alcohol misuse) is an intricate and often a complex relationship involving a multitude of psychosocial factors that cannot be simply explained by an individual having two co‐existing disorders. From this perspective, this paper seeks to argue that the term “dual diagnosis” should be actively de‐emphasised.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers a critique of “dual diagnosis” and the potential impact on access and treatment through discussion of the literature and reflections on service provision.

Findings

The paper identifies five principles termed the “5 key principles”, which support individuals with a wide spectrum of co‐existing difficulties and to counteract the stigma often associated with the term “dual diagnosis”. These collective principles allow the practitioner to consider the needs of the service user from the service user's perspective and therefore not be distracted by the perceived set of expected behaviours that are implied by the “dual diagnosis” label.

Originality/value

This paper offers a critique of the term “dual diagnosis” and explores the impact of this in terms of service users and makes practical suggestions for alternative ways of conceptualising co‐existing mental health and substance difficulties.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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