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1 – 10 of 539
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Jean Claude Cachia, Fabrizio Ellul, Mark Harwood and Carmen Sammut

The purpose of this paper is to analyse why Malta continues to show the highest level of turnout for European Parliament (EP) elections in a country where voting is not…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse why Malta continues to show the highest level of turnout for European Parliament (EP) elections in a country where voting is not obligatory. By analysing the Maltese EP elections from 2004 to 2019, the paper seeks to understand why the Maltese engage with a second order election to the degree that they do.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, first assessing the context of the 2019 elections, the historical trends and then the factors that help explain why the Maltese continue to engage with EP elections.

Findings

The paper finds that the Maltese political system, highly polarised and dominated by two parties, primarily galvanises people to engage with elections, that it is more about party leadership than actual engagement with Europe and that second order elections in Malta are often run as first order elections.

Originality/value

This paper is the only systematic evaluation of the 2019 EP elections in Malta, discusses categorically that EP elections are rarely about Europe while also showing clearly that political parties can make second-order elections appear as first-order elections should the stakes be high enough.

Details

Review of Economics and Political Science, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2356-9980

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2022

Linus Thomson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how new technology-based firms (NTBFs) overcome established notions of scale and scope through business model innovation, leveraging…

2516

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how new technology-based firms (NTBFs) overcome established notions of scale and scope through business model innovation, leveraging the value from digitalization.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts an exploratory research design, drawing on a novel data set of 50 publicly available interviews with vertical farming (VF) industry leaders and insiders who represent 36 different organizations from North America and Europe.

Findings

The study develops a framework showing how NTBFs leverage the value from digitalization via a paradoxical approach combining both efficiency and novelty value drivers.

Originality/value

The study extends current theorizing on the desirability of a combined business model approach leveraging both efficiency and novelty from digitalization. Furthermore, the study is among the first to investigate the unique and highly technological context of VF.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 33 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Thibaut Coulon, Henri Barki and Guy Paré

The purpose of this paper is to develop a clear and generalizable conceptualization of project team momentum, as well as a detailed and engaging research agenda on this concept.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a clear and generalizable conceptualization of project team momentum, as well as a detailed and engaging research agenda on this concept.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted to achieve the study’s objectives. The review acknowledges the meanings that researchers in the field of sports have ascribed to the concept of momentum.

Findings

The paper develops a multidimensional (cognitive, affective and behavioral) conceptualization of project team momentum, as well as a conceptual framework that clearly distinguishes this construct from its antecedents and consequences.

Research limitations/implications

The paper encourages researchers to adopt the proposed conceptualization of project team momentum and to investigate the questions proposed in the research agenda.

Originality/value

The paper develops a strong conceptual basis for a concept that is highly relevant to, but currently not well-understood in, the project management domain. The proposed conceptualization is likely to contribute to the development of a sound theory of project team dynamics and project success.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Shahar Gindi and Rakefet Erlich Ron

Attitudes toward minority employees are hard to predict, and there is no enough information about the variables that are associated with increased and decreased prejudice toward…

Abstract

Purpose

Attitudes toward minority employees are hard to predict, and there is no enough information about the variables that are associated with increased and decreased prejudice toward them. The Jewish and Arab education systems in Israel are, for the most part, segregated, which may potentially contribute to prejudice and alienation between the two populations. The integration of Israeli–Arab teachers in Jewish schools has been suggested to reduce prejudice. The current study sought to examine Israeli teachers' attitudes toward the inclusion of Arab teachers in Jewish schools (AJ) and its relation to degree of religiosity, minority status and demographic variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,644 teachers completed an online 22-item questionnaire that surveyed background variables such as gender, mother tongue, seniority and degree of religiosity, the two independent variables, religiosity and minority status, and the dependent variable, attitude toward the inclusion of AJ.

Findings

Overall, teachers exhibited positive attitudes toward the integration of AJ. Multiple linear regression indicated that among Jewish teachers, the degree of religiosity was the strongest predictor of the teachers' attitudes toward inclusion but was a poor predictor among Arabs. Conversely, minority status was the strongest predictor among Arab teachers but was a poor predictor among Israeli Jews. Not only did religiosity differ in its prediction of attitudes among Arabs and Jews but also the patterns of religiosity were quite different among these two groups.

Research limitations/implications

While the overall sample was wide, the specific minority groups that were examined were small and did not allow deep exploration of minority nuances. The study's generalizability is hampered by the given exceptionality of the Israeli context, where “Church” and State are not separated. Religiosity was examined in a unidimensional way and failed to explore other related factors that may be relevant, such as political inclination.

Practical implications

The study further refutes the notion of commonality among minorities. It proposes to place more emphasis on religion's role in attitudes toward minority employees. Further research into the role of religiosity in Israeli Jews' attitudes toward Arabs is needed.

Social implications

The findings suggest that the degree of religiosity might be a central factor in Israeli Jews' attitudes toward the Arab minority in general.

Originality/value

The research calls attention to the association of Judaism and nationalism as well as segregation, contributing to negative attitudes and prejudice toward the Arab minority. Unlike previous research using contact theory, the authors call attention to the importance of examining willingness to make contact prior to examining the impact of contact itself.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2013

Harwood K. McClerking

Purpose – The chapter examines the relationship between Black elected officials (as candidates and in office) and the media that covers them by examining how media use race when…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter examines the relationship between Black elected officials (as candidates and in office) and the media that covers them by examining how media use race when discussing these officials.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter uses a content analysis design. The basic strategy is to examine eight years’ worth of discussion in newspapers, both in Ohio and nationwide, concerning Mark Mallory as he runs for mayor of Cincinnati and then acts as mayor from 2005 to mid-2012.Findings – The chapter provides information on how the media (mainstream media and Black media) includes racial mentions when discussing Mark Mallory. The findings support my two main hypotheses: that Mark Mallory is more heavily racialized as a mayoral candidate in mainstream newspapers than he is as a sitting mayor, and that for Black newspapers, he is more heavily racialized at either stage (candidate or sitting mayor) than he is with mainstream newspapers.Research limitations/implications – Because the research only looks at one individual, the findings lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers should expand the focus to examine more Black elected officials and/or Black candidates for office.Practical and social implications – The chapter shows how discussions of race around a Black elected official may be beyond that official’s control.Originality/value – This chapter is original in showing how race can be made a part of the public media discussions of minority elected officials. The research design gives us a template for future study of the influence of race in media representations in minority politics.

Details

21st Century Urban Race Politics: Representing Minorities as Universal Interests
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-184-7

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1906

EVERY now and again, one of the solemn monthly or quarterly magazines, by way of enlivening its pages, inserts a terrific onslaught on municipal libraries, in which the judgment…

Abstract

EVERY now and again, one of the solemn monthly or quarterly magazines, by way of enlivening its pages, inserts a terrific onslaught on municipal libraries, in which the judgment of heaven is called down upon the fiction reader, and the library authorities are condemned as a set of ignorant and inefficient office‐holders, who pander to a depraved public taste. The last assailant of this sort whom we had the pleasure of setting right was Mr. J. Churton Collins, who used the Nineteenth Century and After, as the medium for conveying his accusations. Now comes Mr. W. H. Harwood, who fills six‐and‐a‐half pages of the Westminster Review for February, 1906, with a quantum of twaddle about libraries, which differs from most recent articles of the same sort only in its dulness. In his use of this journalistic cliché, Mr. Harwood displays the customary ignorance of the Public Libraries Acts, by styling his paper “Free Libraries and Fiction,” and by his failure to prove even one of his statements by reference to a single concrete fact. Briefly, Mr. Harwood's position is this:—

Details

New Library World, vol. 8 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Paul Greenbank

This paper aims to examine how students from foundation degrees (FDs) run at local further education colleges coped (academically and to a lesser extent psychologically) with the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how students from foundation degrees (FDs) run at local further education colleges coped (academically and to a lesser extent psychologically) with the transition to a final year honours degree at a university.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the experience of FD graduates who joined the final year of a full‐time BSc (Hons) in Business and Management at Edge Hill University. The study utilised questionnaires and focus groups with the FD graduates. It also involved interviews with the lecturers at Edge Hill and the programme managers of the foundation degrees.

Findings

The study found that the transition from foundation to honours degree created considerable levels of stress for the students. This largely arose because of the different approaches to teaching and learning adopted in further and higher education. In particular, Edge Hill adopted a more academic approach; there was less support; and there was a greater emphasis on independent learning. This paper identifies the need for more support for students making the transition from foundation to honours degrees. It also discusses different options for improving the transition process and highlights issues requiring further research and debate.

Originality/value

The experience of students making the transition from foundation degrees to honours degrees is under‐researched. This paper addresses this gap in the research. It will be of interest to policy makers, those involved in delivering foundation degrees and those recruiting FD graduates on to their honours programmes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Peter Willett

The aim of this paper is to determine the extent to which readers perceive correctly the reasons why authors cite items in scholarly texts.

1221

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the extent to which readers perceive correctly the reasons why authors cite items in scholarly texts.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors of ten library and information science articles provided the reasons for citing material in their articles and these reasons were compared with those suggested independently by readers of the articles.

Findings

Readers are able to perceive correctly author reasons for citation only to a very limited extent.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are a small sample of ten articles and 45 reader assessments of those articles, and the use of a single classification of reasons for citation.

Practical implications

The findings call into question techniques such as citation context analysis that are based on the assumption that readers understand the reasons why authors cite material.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to compare author and reader reasons for citation and hence to validate the use of citation context analysis.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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