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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Maung Min, Francois Desmoulins-Lebeault and Mark Esposito

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) really adds value to corporate financial performance (CFP) in the pharmaceutical…

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3082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) really adds value to corporate financial performance (CFP) in the pharmaceutical industry. Most pharmaceutical companies currently practice CSR by taking a “triple bottom line” approach of environmental, social, and economic strategies to manage their businesses and produce an overall positive impact.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was developed based on professional experience, Carroll’s construct, the study’s hypotheses, and industry studies. The survey, composed of 45 questions using a seven-point Likert scale, was conducted among pharmaceutical professionals to evaluate whether CSR affects performance. Responses totaling 140, including 20 companies, were coded, taking into account the respondent’s corporate position and firm size.

Findings

Survey respondents strongly agreed that CSR adds value to CFP and should be viewed as a long-term investment. CSR programs should be implemented regardless of company size. CSR is effective because it invests in stakeholder management, such as with customers, government, investors, and activists, creating positive relationships which improve reputation and profitability.

Research limitations/implications

This perception study shows the need for further quantitative analysis of CSR and CFP metrics specific to the pharmaceutical industry.

Practical implications

CSR programs should be implemented regardless of company size, and sheer size does not dictate whether CSR programs can be successful. This paper also sheds light on potential managerial implications that originate from these findings that may help pharmaceutical companies manage their scarce resources more effectively.

Social implications

In today’s competitive economic environment, where increasingly stakeholders including investors scrutinize pharmaceutical firms’ environmental and social performance, CSR is a crucial strategy. The findings can help corporate managers make strategic CSR decisions to optimize benefits for their organization.

Originality/value

While numerous studies have addressed the link between CSR and corporate performance across industries, definitive studies have not examined the pharmaceutical industry.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Fabien Martinez, Patrick O’Sullivan, Mark Smith and Mark Esposito

The purpose of this paper is to examine the conceptual construct of social innovation in business as distinct from social innovation implemented by civil society and the…

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1219

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the conceptual construct of social innovation in business as distinct from social innovation implemented by civil society and the state. The general absence of sustained research and analysis of this phenomenon, and the dominance of grey and policy-oriented literature, mean that a broadly accepted definition of how social innovation theorises the changing role of business in society is missing

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative review of the representative literature on social innovation was conducted. The analysis focused on the key arguments made about the involvement of business actors in processes of social innovation and interweaved in this study to build a logically coherent definition of what social innovation in business means for the bulk of those who write and speak about it today. The scope of the literature review was expanded by integrating insights from the extant “business in society” and social innovation literatures, thereby adding clarity to the authors' conceptualisation.

Findings

The findings indicate that social innovation is best understood as a process driven by human relations, morality and creative capacity breaking routines and path dependencies. It fundamentally relies on the socially constructed dynamics between business and social actors who carry ideas, focus their energies, mobilise competences and create new complementarities to tackle social problems. Economic gain, in this approach, is at best an outcome of social innovation, not its engine.

Originality/value

What this literature review unveils that is unique about social innovation, and contributes to an enrichment of the “business in society” debate beyond the business case and win-win scenarios depicted by most scholars in this field, is that it best manifests itself as an informal social process that comes into existence at the margins of conventional ways of thinking and organising business activities. Business actors involved in social innovation are framed as self-directed and self-organised around the moral purpose of fostering social progress.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Rosaria Addamo, Bruno S. Sergi and Mark Esposito

This paper aims to draw on data from a survey research study conducted in Italy that explored the effects of performance-related pay (PRP) among 500 high school teachers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to draw on data from a survey research study conducted in Italy that explored the effects of performance-related pay (PRP) among 500 high school teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses studies were conducted.

Findings

The results are consistent with theoretical predictions that monetary incentives for activities with a strong social impact may crowd out employee image motivation. This study documents that the use of monetary incentives is neither necessary nor desirable and the pay-for-performance does not affect the intrinsic motivation of teaching staff employees.

Originality/value

This work advances the conversation on relative pay in the field of higher education in Italy.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Joseph C. Santora, James C. Sarros and Mark Esposito

Presents findings of a recent survey conducted on small to mid‐sized nonprofit organizations about the types of leadership development initiatives they offer employees.

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1446

Abstract

Purpose

Presents findings of a recent survey conducted on small to mid‐sized nonprofit organizations about the types of leadership development initiatives they offer employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey and interview methods used to collect data from nonprofit executive directors who participated in this study.

Findings

Most survey participants do not have the financial and other organizational capacities to offer leadership development initiatives to employees. In‐service workshops are the most frequent type of initiative and unfortunately often this learning initiative has a low impact given its limited short‐term exposure to participants. Other leadership development initiatives may be more beneficial to employees in terms of their long‐term impact.

Practical implications

Provides recommendations for small to mid‐sized nonprofit executive directors about ways to fund leadership development initiatives.

Originality/value

Offers nonprofit executive directors with suggestions about not investing in leadership development initiatives.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Mark Esposito, Amit Kapoor and Sandeep Goyal

The access to high quality, a reliable and affordable basic healthcare service is one of the key challenges facing the rural and semi‐urban population lying at base of the

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2104

Abstract

Purpose

The access to high quality, a reliable and affordable basic healthcare service is one of the key challenges facing the rural and semi‐urban population lying at base of the pyramid (BoP) in India. Realizing this as a social challenge and an economic opportunity (shared value), there has been an emergence of healthcare service providers who have bundled entrepreneurial attitude and passion with available scarce resources to design and implement cost‐effective, reliable and scalable market solutions for the BoP. The purpose of this research paper is to understand the underlying operating principles of these self‐sustainable business models aimed at providing healthcare services to the BoP segment in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical context involves the use of case study research methodology, where the source of data is published case studies and the company websites of four healthcare organizations who have made a socio‐economic difference in the lives of the rural and semi‐urban population lying at the BoP in India.

Findings

The analysis and findings reflect the key operating principles for sustainable healthcare business ventures at the BoP. These include focus on 4A's (accessible, affordable, acceptable and awareness), local engagement, local skills building, learning by experiment, flexible organizational structure, dynamic leadership, technology integration and scalability.

Research limitations/implications

This research study has focused mainly on the published case studies as source of data.

Originality/value

The intent is to understand and bring forth the learning and guiding principles, which act as a catalyst for the future researchers and business ventures engaged in BoP context.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Future Governments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-359-9

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Paula Matos Marques Simoes and Mark Esposito

Little has been studied yet in terms of how communication nature influences change process. The purpose of this paper is to explore a case study that takes part in a…

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20613

Abstract

Purpose

Little has been studied yet in terms of how communication nature influences change process. The purpose of this paper is to explore a case study that takes part in a broader research project, aimed to contribute in this direction.

Design/methodology/approach

Mix methodology has been applied to the findings, to characterize resistance to change and communication nature within one organization under a radical change process.

Findings

One main theoretical contribution is an instrumental grid to characterize dialogic communication nature.

Originality/value

Findings of the case study originally indicate that resistance to change reduces under dialogic communication and by revealing how communication dimensions perform in time, practitioners may enhance guidelines to effective change communication management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Joseph C. Santora, James C. Sarros and Mark Esposito

– The aim of this article was to describe successor types of four nonprofit founders.

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986

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article was to describe successor types of four nonprofit founders.

Design/methodology/approach

This article uses the previous case study research and participant/nonparticipant observation to illustrate the different nonprofit founder types to prepare for successors.

Findings

Four founder types included destroyer, conscientious, maverick, and controller. Each founder type had several unique characteristics. A common feature across all four types was autocratic control.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the generalizability of the findings based on the sample. Recommendations include re-examination of the ways founders approach succession issues.

Practical implications

Founders involved in succession issues can benefit by better understanding the succession process as well as the legacy they leave as a result of their approach to succession based on type.

Originality/value

This article offers new insights into the approaches nonprofit founders take about selecting a successor. Founders considering a successor can determine their type and adjust accordingly to select the best possible replacement for the organization.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Joseph C. Santora, James C. Sarros and Mark Esposito

This article aims to provide founders, executive directors, and board members with a case study of a nonprofit executive director who, as a result of his refusal to “let…

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368

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide founders, executive directors, and board members with a case study of a nonprofit executive director who, as a result of his refusal to “let go” of the organization he founded, created serious problems for his successor and role confusion for staff and organizational stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

This article uses the case study method to illustrate a problem founders of nonprofit organizations can create, when they take an active role within the organization after retirement.

Findings

Despite all the good outcomes and accomplishments attributed to founders, this article argues that founders can create irreparable harm to organizations when they remain active in the organization following the appointment of a successor. Despite the difficulty and personal and psychological connection to the organization, founders should allow the organization to develop and grow under the direction of the successor.

Practical implications

Founders, executive directors, and board members can all learn from this case by developing and implementing appropriate executive succession strategies.

Originality/value

This article informs founders of nonprofits about the potential harm they can create for the organization and its stakeholders by continuing to govern after retirement.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Abstract

Details

Future Governments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-359-9

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