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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Mark Deakin

The paper examines how a property management division has sought to adopt the recommendations of the Audit Commission and Chartered Institute of Public Finance and…

Abstract

The paper examines how a property management division has sought to adopt the recommendations of the Audit Commission and Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy reports on local authority property management, and measures the democratically‐elected body has taken via its central committee, executive and directorate, to apply Information Technology (IT) in the development of a computer‐based information system for the registration of assets, valuation of property and measurement of performance.

Details

Property Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Ly Thi Tran, Jill Blackmore and Mark Rahimi

International student employability has been accorded increased emphasis in the internationalisation agendas, especially in major destination countries as it shapes…

Abstract

Purpose

International student employability has been accorded increased emphasis in the internationalisation agendas, especially in major destination countries as it shapes universities' attractiveness to prospective international students. Having insights into returning graduates' employability in their home country has become critical given that a majority of international graduates return home after their overseas study. This study responds to this critical need by examining how foreign credentials are valued by employers in the field of accounting in China, based on in-depth interviews with employers, alumni and policymakers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on a qualitative approach involving literature review and in-depth interviews with 28 key stakeholders: employers, returning graduates and policymakers in China and India. The key research question of the study is how foreign credentials are valued by employers in the field of accounting in China and India. This article focuses on the Chinese context. In-depth interviews with employers and policymakers focused on eliciting nuanced socio-cultural understandings as to perceptions and decisions associated with desirable graduate attributes and the relative value of credentials. Interviews with returning graduates aimed to understand how different capitals were mobilised to gain employment in the Chinese labour market.

Findings

The empirical findings of the study show that Chinese returning graduates could be seen to lack the localised knowledge needed to work in Chinese companies and ability to adapt to the local environment. However the possible development of a dual local and international guanxi through overseas study can be regarded as a marker of distinction in the home labour market. The associated value of such a dual guanxi signals the importance for Chinese international students to develop transnational networks while simultaneously maintaining their kinship, social and business networks locally during their overseas education.

Originality/value

The study provides fresh insights into a marked shift in China, with less of a preference for Western credentials, as compared to 10 years ago when overseas credentials were often regarded more favourably. Even though overseas study generally provides Chinese graduates with an exposure to international practices and global perspectives, whether such an overseas exposure and foreign language competency would be an advantage also depends on the business needs and sometimes the business model of organisations.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Bhzad Sidawi and Mark Deakin

Diabetes mellitus is the most common non-communicable medical condition worldwide, yet little is known about the relationship this disease has to the built environment…

Abstract

Purpose

Diabetes mellitus is the most common non-communicable medical condition worldwide, yet little is known about the relationship this disease has to the built environment. The purpose of this paper is to throw some much needed light on the matter by shifting attention away from the epidemiology of the medical condition and towards the anthropology of the unhealthy lifestyles whose habit-persistent practices are associated with the spread of the disease.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the delicate relation between diabetes, unhealthy lifestyles and built environments. It discusses the potential of smart city technologies to promote healthy lifestyles, particularly for diabetic patients.

Findings

Smart cities currently being developed in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) do not highlight the health-related benefits of their design and layout and there are currently no plans for the community to address the unhealthy lifestyles of existing neighbourhoods as part of a sustainable urban development programme. So, realising the health-related benefits of smart city neighbourhoods in the KSA shall be challenging.

Research limitations/implications

In attempting to tackle diabetes, cities not only need to be “green and lean” in planning the healthy lifestyles they set out for the development of communities, but also “get smart” about the digital technologies and platform of electronically enhanced services which are required to meet the design and layout challenges smart city neighbourhoods pose.

Originality/value

Gulf and Saudi cities should adopt the IntelCities analogy, so the virtual planning and development of “smart city neighbourhoods”, along with their design and layout of buildings, can tackle the underlying causes.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Olubukola Tokede, Nilupa Udawatta and Mark Luther

Heritage buildings are a crucial part of the UK built sector. They perpetuate a sense of identity, prestige and community. Many heritage buildings however tend to be…

Abstract

Purpose

Heritage buildings are a crucial part of the UK built sector. They perpetuate a sense of identity, prestige and community. Many heritage buildings however tend to be energy inefficient and the scope for retrofitting such buildings is paramount. Heritage buildings require ratification from planning bodies in order to undertake any alteration on the building. This tends to create a bottleneck in the retrofitting of heritage office buildings. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilises a case study building in Scotland to evaluate the potential for retrofitting in a UK heritage office building. Building energy simulation software is used to generate the energy data in different retrofit options. A scenario analysis on the heritage status of the building is also undertaken.

Findings

The costs, energy consumption and carbon emission levels are evaluated and compared. It was found that the differential in annual energy savings achieved, based on the proportion of capital cost to operational cost, is 14.6 per cent in the heritage building, compared to 24.6 per cent in the non-heritage building.

Originality/value

The study suggests that government and other stakeholders should seek for ways of incentivising retrofit investments in heritage buildings. This will provide an effective way of minimising the contributions of the built environment to global warming and climate change.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Rebecca Lindberg, Mark Lawrence, Lisa Gold and Sharon Friel

Food rescue is used in the emergency food sector internationally to reduce waste and improve food supplies to frontline providers and their clients. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Food rescue is used in the emergency food sector internationally to reduce waste and improve food supplies to frontline providers and their clients. The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on why and how food rescue occurs in Australia. It also examines food rescue as a potential evolution within the emergency food setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive study of SecondBite, an Australian food rescue organisation, was conducted. Documents were reviewed, 14 weeks of participant observation occurred, and two focus group discussions were held. Framing analysis was used to design the research questions (why rescue food? and how?). The description of the organisation was then examined against critical literature to establish how food rescue conforms to and/or challenges the traditional limitations of emergency food.

Findings

Food rescue requires multiple resources within the emergency food space including surplus food, funding and labour. The frames used to justify this work provide an insight into the “problem” of food poverty in Australia and the “solution” of food rescue. The script for “people in need” requiring “fresh food” is well developed by SecondBite, with some tension around food waste reduction as a competing and yet complementary mission.

Originality/value

In light of the growing role of the not for profit sector in a “big society” political order, the rescuing of nutritious food for emergency parcels and meals, may provide some benefits for people already using emergency food. The opportunity for food rescue organisations to play a role in food poverty prevention requires further attention.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Mark Deakin

The paper examines the development of the financial instruments (land audits, property reviews, information systems, registers and approaches to valuation) required to…

Abstract

The paper examines the development of the financial instruments (land audits, property reviews, information systems, registers and approaches to valuation) required to replace the expenditure‐driven logic of public sector finance with the system of capital accounting in local authorities advocated by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy. The examination draws on the findings of a research project undertaken to survey the steps local authorities have taken to develop the property registers and valuation procedures for such purposes. It highlights the critical role property valuation plays in introducing a system of capital accounting that ensures that the financing of the public sector is not expenditure‐driven, but subject to value‐for‐money tests, and meets the economy and efficiency criteria which this requires.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Mohamed Atef Elhamy Kamel

It is noted that cities in the region of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) have a very poor Walkability Index. It is typically the forgotten mode of transport. Moreover…

Abstract

Purpose

It is noted that cities in the region of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) have a very poor Walkability Index. It is typically the forgotten mode of transport. Moreover, walking has become impossible. This is not just due to the scorching weather conditions but also due to the excessive dependence of the residents on the private automobile. The purpose of this paper is to explore walkability urban problems and to propose smart urban solutions so as to encourage walking in GCC cities.

Design/methodology/approach

This present paper defines walkability and portrays its advantages and benefits. It adapts the criteria of walkability to meet GCC cities’ planning needs. Furthermore, it analyzes Masdar City in Abu Dhabi as an example of encouraging walkability using smart solutions. The pilot case study for this present paper, King Abdullah national park in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, will be the application pool of those criteria. However, a questionnaire has been formulated in order to solicit some facts about attaining pedestrian comfort in that park.

Findings

The paper provides various smart urban solutions so as to encourage walkability in GCC cities.

Originality/value

Through presenting an overview of walkability in GCC cities and suggesting smart urban solutions, an additional study would be required to encourage walkability in other environments using various intelligent urban features.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Abstract

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Mark Deakin

Outlines the attempts made over the past few years to develop the financial services required by Kiev City council’s property management division to function as a…

Abstract

Outlines the attempts made over the past few years to develop the financial services required by Kiev City council’s property management division to function as a privatization authority ‐ to develop, that is, what is referred to as the financial aspects of property management or, to be more precise, the accountancy, real estate, asset valuation and leasing services, which the property management division of Kiev City require to participate in the privatization, economic reform and process of liberalization the Ukraine has become subject to since the break‐up of the former USSR.

Details

Property Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Mohammed Saied Al Surf, Bambang Trigunarsyah and Connie Susilawati

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to bridge the gap between sustainable housing and the use of smart technologies to improve the level of sustainability in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to bridge the gap between sustainable housing and the use of smart technologies to improve the level of sustainability in the housing construction in Saudi Arabia, by discussing the barriers and enablers concerned with applying sustainability to housing construction in Saudi Arabia, which utilises smart technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi method survey was employed, for which 25 individuals from three key stakeholder groups of the Saudi housing sector participated. They were asked about their degree of agreement (or disagreement) about the various barriers and enablers of applying sustainability to housing construction in Saudi Arabia, which utilises smart technologies. This research paper must be considered as an indicative study of selected experts that do not represent in any way the total population of Saudi Arabia.

Findings

Lack of public awareness has been identified as the most significant barrier in implementing sustainable housing development in Saudi Arabia, which utilises smart technologies. Raising awareness of the public to the benefits of sustainable housing and enlightening key project stakeholders in the design of sustainable housing are both essential in order to overcome the barriers discussed in this paper. In addition, it is important to adopt smart sustainable construction methods, exemplified by but not limited to, appropriate water preservation and wastewater treatment systems that are simultaneously smart and sustainable.

Research limitations/implications

This particular research has dealt with only barriers and enablers in the application of sustainability to housing in Saudi Arabia, which utilises smart technologies. For a more complete understanding, there is a need for further analysis of supplementary factors.

Practical implications

A study such as this, which identifies and prioritises barriers and enablers, could prove useful in guiding or encouraging the relevant ministry in Saudi Arabia to develop policies founded in the implementation of sustainability to the housing sector.

Originality/value

This research is a preliminary investigation into the implementation of sustainable housing development as it relates to Saudi Arabia.

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