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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Kathryn Ostermeier, Mark Davis and Robert Pavur

The purpose of this study is to examine the facilitating and inhibiting influence of team-level negative affectivity and conscientiousness on a dyad of emergent states…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the facilitating and inhibiting influence of team-level negative affectivity and conscientiousness on a dyad of emergent states, adopting and comparing both the composition and compilation perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected over three time points from 410 undergraduate students nested within cross-functional project teams (N = 62). The data, including individual self-reports and judges’ ratings of team performance, were aggregated to the team-level using both composition (mean) and compilation (skewness) approaches.

Findings

The findings indicate that mean-levels of negative affectivity were associated with decreased psychological safety. The use of skewed conscientiousness counterintuitively suggests too many highly conscientious members can also be detrimental to psychological safety. Psychological safety influences team potency and ultimately performance.

Originality/value

The results of this study highlight that the aggregation approach used is important. For example, the use of skewed (but not mean-level) conscientiousness brought an undetected and counterintuitive relationship to light. Future research should use compilation approaches in addition to composition approaches.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Daniel Arturo Cernas Ortiz and Mark A. Davis

This paper aims to examine the influence of future and past negative time perspectives on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. The effect of national culture…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of future and past negative time perspectives on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. The effect of national culture (Mexico versus the USA) as a moderator of the above baseline relationships is also analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model is tested using survey data drawn from a sample of 287 Mexican and 274 US MBA students (N = 561). Regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Future time perspective has a positive relationship with job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Past negative time perspective has a negative association with both job attitudes. The effect of future time perspective on job satisfaction was significantly stronger in Mexico than in the USA. No other significant differences between the countries were found in terms of the time perspective and job attitudes association.

Practical implications

The results have implications for managing dispositions that affect work-related attitudes and behaviors with consequences for organizational effectiveness.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that time perspective affects job attitudes. Further, they also suggest that the interplay between future time perspective and culture influences job satisfaction.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Mark H. Davis, Michael B. Schoenfeld and Elizabeth J. Flores

This paper aims to compare style and behavior-focused individual difference measures in their ability to uniquely predict naturally occurring conflict acts.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare style and behavior-focused individual difference measures in their ability to uniquely predict naturally occurring conflict acts.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary participants (and a friend of their choosing) completed a style measure and a behavior-focused measure about the primary participants and reported on the occurrence of a variety of conflict actions over a 60-day period.

Findings

For self-ratings and friend ratings, both the style measure and the behavior-focused measure were significantly related to the occurrence of conflict acts. However, the unique effect of the behavior-focused measure was stronger than that of the style measure.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected from college students, thus limiting the generalizability of the findings. The measure of conflict acts was based on recall, which may also be subject to error and bias. In terms of implications, the findings strongly suggest that behavior-focused instruments are superior to style measures in predicting everyday conflict acts.

Practical implications

Because the behavior-focused individual difference measure was a better predictor of actual behavior than the style measure, investigators interested in such prediction may want to seriously consider using such measures.

Originality/value

Little research exists regarding the relative predictive abilities of style measures and behavior-focused measures; this paper provides some of the first such evidence.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Mark E. Jones, Jack L. Simonetti and Mary Vielhaber‐Hermon

This article describes a systematic process initiated by Parke‐Davis Pharmaceutical Research and Development to increase the leadership capabilities of its scientific…

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933

Abstract

This article describes a systematic process initiated by Parke‐Davis Pharmaceutical Research and Development to increase the leadership capabilities of its scientific management staff. Our approach to helping scientists step up to the challenging responsibility of leading others was built around four powerful ideas: imagination, leadership, application, and community. A process of university based executive education programs and follow‐up sessions was initiated to help managers shift their perspective from following the science to leading other scientists. Achievement of this objective was accomplished by developing a partnership with the University of Michigan Executive Education Center.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Mark M. Davis and Janelle Heineke

The experience of waiting for service is often the first direct interaction between customers and most service delivery processes. The literature on satisfaction with…

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15280

Abstract

The experience of waiting for service is often the first direct interaction between customers and most service delivery processes. The literature on satisfaction with waiting has paralleled the literature on general service satisfaction, in which the relative importance of actual performance, perceived performance, and the disconfirmation between expected performance and perceived performance has been the subject of much debate. This paper presents an empirical study of satisfaction with waiting for service in a fast food environment. The study demonstrates that actual waiting time, perceived waiting time, and the disconfirmation between expected waiting time and perceived waiting time are all related to satisfaction with the waiting experience. It further demonstrates that the relative importance of each of these variables in predicting satisfaction depends on the differences in the needs of the customers. The implications for both theory and practice are significant: the importance of the perception of the experience increases as the importance of the satisfaction measure increases. More specifically, for customers who are concerned about time, the perception of the time spent waiting is a better predictor of satisfaction than the actual waiting time.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Mark M. Davis and Thomas E. Vollmann

Introduces a framework for integrating the operations managementand marketing approaches within a service operation. Focuses on customersatisfaction with waiting time…

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4817

Abstract

Introduces a framework for integrating the operations management and marketing approaches within a service operation. Focuses on customer satisfaction with waiting time, with the aim of providing improved satisfaction for a given level of resources. Provides an application of this methodology by presenting an example in the fast food industry. Concludes with suggestions for extending such a framework to other service organizations.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Don Yates and Mark Davis

Only in the search tor answers to disruptive questions will you find the means to build an Extraordinary Organization

Abstract

Only in the search tor answers to disruptive questions will you find the means to build an Extraordinary Organization

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Eric J. Neuman, Gerald F. Davis and Mark S. Mizruchi

This chapter analyzes the relations among bank mergers, changes in boards and their networks, and changes in the global footprint of merging banks. We examine all mergers…

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the relations among bank mergers, changes in boards and their networks, and changes in the global footprint of merging banks. We examine all mergers involving U.S. banks with foreign branches between 1986 and 2004. We find that while the largest banks have become even larger through mergers, their boards have stayed roughly the same size with the same pattern of connections, leaving banks relatively less central in the intercorporate network. And while global banks previously had more globally oriented boards, this is no longer the case, as the link between board networks and strategy has become more tenuous. Because global banks were particularly prone to merging, the average commercial bank in the U.S. is now far more domestically oriented than firms in most other industries. American banks have thus become more domestic at the same time that the rest of American industry has grown much more global.

Details

Network Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1442-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

MARK H.A. DAVIS, WALTER SCHACHERMAYER and ROBERT G. TOMPKINS

This article discusses static hedges for installment options, which are finding broad application in cases where the option‐buyer may reduce up‐front premium costs via…

Abstract

This article discusses static hedges for installment options, which are finding broad application in cases where the option‐buyer may reduce up‐front premium costs via early termination of an option. An installment option is a European option in which the premium, instead of being paid up front, is paid in a series of installments. If all installments are paid, the holder receives the exercise value, but the holder has the right terminate payments on any payment date, in which case the option lapses with no further payments on either side. The authors summarize pricing and risk management concepts for these options, in particular, using static hedges to obtain both no‐arbitrage pricing bounds and very effective hedging strategies with almost no vega risk.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Amy P. Lippa, Linda C. Lee, Meghan D. Lehr, Daniel D. Spikes, Leslie A. Coward, Bradley W. Davis, Mark A. Gooden and Dorothy R. Hall

As a team of eight scholars at the University of Texas, we collaborate to research issues that directly focus on the development, training, and experiences of anti-racist…

Abstract

As a team of eight scholars at the University of Texas, we collaborate to research issues that directly focus on the development, training, and experiences of anti-racist and social justice leaders in urban secondary schools. Each of us considered a personal event, or series of events, that significantly influenced our thinking about social justice. We share experiences of personal and institutional racism, and reflect on how these experiences continue to shape our awareness of race. Our perspectives capture how issues of race and racial discrimination persist in a status quo educational system and how past experiences directly influence our work.

Details

Living the Work: Promoting Social Justice and Equity Work in Schools around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-127-5

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