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Article

Daniel F.C. Crowley, Bruce J. Heiman, R. Charles Miller, Philip J. Morgan, Mark D. Perlow, David K.Y. Tang and Karishma Shah Page

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the Group of Thirty's recommendations and explain how they relate to other concurrent financial market regulatory initiatives in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the Group of Thirty's recommendations and explain how they relate to other concurrent financial market regulatory initiatives in the USA, UK, and Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarizes the report's four core recommendations, describes how they relate to recent reports by the US Treasury Department, the US Chamber of Commerce, and Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, and discusses how they may signal the direction of forthcoming domestic and coordinated international regulation.

Findings

Momentum has been building for consolidation, increased oversight, and international coordination of the legal and regulatory framework that governs the financial industry. The report has an unabashedly pro‐regulatory agenda.

Originality/value

The paper provides helpful reference on the current direction of international financial institution regulation

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Article

Brenden Carroll, Mark Perlow, Christine Ayako Schleppegrell and Sam Scarritt-Selman

To explain the SEC’s Share Class Selection Disclosure Initiative (SCSD Initiative), the purpose it seeks to serve, the results it has generated, and its broader…

Abstract

Purpose

To explain the SEC’s Share Class Selection Disclosure Initiative (SCSD Initiative), the purpose it seeks to serve, the results it has generated, and its broader implications for the asset management industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Explains the newly announced results of the SEC’s Share Class Selection Disclosure Initiative. Provides background on the principles underlying the initiative, the mechanics by which the initiative’s self-reporting program operated, and industry reaction to the initiative. Analyzes the results the initiative generated, in terms of both aggregate disgorgement and the terms of settlement offered to self-reporting advisers. Draws conclusions and provides key takeaways.

Findings

Although the terms of the actual settlements were consistent with the framework of standardized settlement terms set forth in the SCSD Initiative, whether the standardized terms of settlement offered under the SCSD Initiative ultimately will be viewed as favorable will depend in large part upon how the SEC continues to treat advisers that did not self-report.

Originality/value

Expert analysis from experienced lawyers in the mutual fund and investment advisory industries.

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Book part

Beth A. Rubin

This chapter draws on recent literature in I/O psychology, management and sociology to posit a relationship between organizational structure and temporal structure and…

Abstract

This chapter draws on recent literature in I/O psychology, management and sociology to posit a relationship between organizational structure and temporal structure and develops the construct of layered-task time. Layered-task time is similar to polychronic time (P-time) in the inclusion of simultaneous, multiple tasks but includes additional dimensions of fragmentation, contamination and constraint. The chapter links the development of this new time and its resultant time-sense to variation in the degree to which organizations are hierarchical and centralized and develops propositions about these relationships. The chapter contributes to the growing literature on workplace temporalities in the contemporary economy.

Details

Workplace Temporalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1268-9

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Article

Vathsala Wickramasinghe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between time demands of work and turnover intention of software…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between time demands of work and turnover intention of software developers in offshore outsourced software development firms (OOSDF) in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research methodology was used and 232 software developers attached to OOSDF responded.

Findings

It was found that job satisfaction partially mediates the relationship between time demands of work and turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the questionnaire survey provided access to breadth of experience. If qualitative data were also obtained those could have provided depth by adding insight and substance to the questionnaire survey.

Practical implications

The findings imply that a greater understanding of employee turnover intentions might be gained by investigating the time demands of work.

Originality/value

It is expected that the paper's findings will provide useful information for both practitioners and academics to better understand the nature of strategies to be adopted in Asian OOSDF.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

Keywords

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Book part

Noelle Chesley and Britta E. Johnson

To assess: (1) the prevalence of specific work practices that incorporate use of information and communication technology (ICT), (2) whether these practices are connected…

Abstract

Purpose

To assess: (1) the prevalence of specific work practices that incorporate use of information and communication technology (ICT), (2) whether these practices are connected to employee distress or productivity via work extension or social network processes; (3) the implications of ICT-based work practices for the work/family interface.

Design/methodology/approach

We draw on the 2008 Pew Networked Workers data collected from a nationally representative sample of workers and use logistic regression methods to investigate links among use of specific ICT-based practices and increases in distress or productivity.

Findings

(1) Use of e-mail, instant messaging, texts, and social networking sites at work varies by demographic, organization, and job characteristics, and (2) ICT-based work extension, social network expansion, and connectivity to work colleagues are linked to increases in distress and productivity. Connecting with family or friends while at work can reduce the likelihood that an employee reports an increase in work stress.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include a cross-sectional design, age of the data, missing data, and measurement issues. Even with these limitations, there are few investigations drawing from national samples of employees that can assess work-related ICT use with this level of depth.

Originality/value

Findings point to technological innovation as an important factor influencing work extension and social network processes and connect this to changes in employee distress and productivity. The focus on productivity is especially important given the emphasis that previous research has placed on linking ICT use and employee distress.

Details

Work and Family in the New Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-630-0

Keywords

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Book part

Marco S. DiRenzo, Steven M. Weingarden and Christian J. Resick

Coaches from both the professional and college ranks are often put forth as archetypal examples of effective leaders – individuals’ whose behaviors, styles, and wisdom…

Abstract

Coaches from both the professional and college ranks are often put forth as archetypal examples of effective leaders – individuals’ whose behaviors, styles, and wisdom provide the ever elusive playbook for how to successfully lead others. While numerous books and articles in the popular press put forth advice from leaders in the sports world, numerous empirical studies of the drivers of successful sports leadership and the factors that contribute to leader success in the context of sports have also been conducted. In this chapter, we first provide a broad review of empirical leadership research conducted within the sports world and examine how research within the sports context provides a suitable and advantageous setting for leadership research in general. Second, we offer a road map of opportunities for future leadership studies within the context of sports. The goal of this chapter is to stimulate and rally more thought-provoking research related to leadership in sports that generates insights for organizational leadership across contexts.

Details

Leadership Lessons from Compelling Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-942-8

Keywords

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Article

Hanne Vesala and Seppo Tuomivaara

The rise of knowledge work has entailed controversial characteristics for well-being at work. Increased intensification, discontinuities and interruptions at work have…

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of knowledge work has entailed controversial characteristics for well-being at work. Increased intensification, discontinuities and interruptions at work have been reported. However, knowledge workers have the opportunity to flexibly adjust their work arrangements to support their concentration, inspiration or recuperation. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the experienced well-being of 46 knowledge workers was subject to changes during and after a retreat type telework period in rural archipelago environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a longitudinal survey among the participants at three points in time: one to three weeks before, during, and two to eight weeks after the period. The authors analyzed the experienced changes in psychosocial work environment and well-being at work by the measurement period by means of repeated measures variance analysis. In the next step the authors included the group variable of occupational position to the model.

Findings

The analysis showed a decrease in the following measures: experienced time pressure, interruptions, negative feelings at work, exhaustiveness of work as well as stress and an increase in work satisfaction. There were no changes in experienced job influence, clarity of work goals and work engagement. Occupational position had some effect to the changes. Private entrepreneurs and supervisors experienced more remarkable effects of improvement in work-related well-being than subordinates. However, the effects were less sustainable for the supervisors than the other two groups.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into how work and well-being are affected by the immediate work environment and how well-being at work can be supported by retreat type telework arrangements.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article

Erik R. Eddy, Caroline P. D'Abate and Paul W. Thurston

The purpose of this paper is to explore rationalizations individuals provide for engaging in personal activities on company time.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore rationalizations individuals provide for engaging in personal activities on company time.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 121 survey respondents working in a variety of organizations and backgrounds. Respondents provided information on the number of times they engage in various personal activities while at work, the amount of time engaged in these activities, and their rationalizations for performing personal activities during work hours.

Findings

Results suggest that employees spend nearly five hours in a typical workweek engaged in personal activities. More than 90 per cent of this time is spent using the internet, email, phone, or conversing with co‐workers. Employees use a variety of rationalizations for such behavior, but only two rationalizations (i.e. boredom and convenience) were statistically reliable predictors of the extent to which they engaged in personal activities on company time.

Practical implications

The current research finds that boredom and convenience are related to the extent that employees engage in personal activities on company time. Improvements in the work environment to reduce boredom might show a marked decrease in these behaviors, thereby mitigating the need for organizations to develop formal policies against these behaviors.

Originality/value

This is only the second quantitative study to examine the amount of time individuals spend engaged in specific personal activities on the job. It is the first quantitative exploration of the rationalizations employees use to justify these behaviors.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part

Allen C. Bluedorn and Kimberly S. Jaussi

As part of the developing attention being paid to time in organization science, this chapter discusses two temporal dimensions – polychronicity and speed – and develops…

Abstract

As part of the developing attention being paid to time in organization science, this chapter discusses two temporal dimensions – polychronicity and speed – and develops propositions relating these two temporal dimensions to other organization science variables. The propositions are specified according to levels of analysis, at least three of which are considered in propositions presented for each dimension. Two other temporal dimensions – punctuality and temporal depth – are also described, albeit not as extensively as polychronicity and speed. A fifth temporal phenomenon, entrainment, provides insights into organizational processes as well as the four temporal dimensions. The chapter concludes by outlining some reasons for caution for both theory and practice.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

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Article

Dow Scott, James W. Bishop and Xiangming Chen

In a U.S. invested enterprise in China, the receptivity of Chinese employees to a participative work environment was examined. Structural equation analysis indicated…

Abstract

In a U.S. invested enterprise in China, the receptivity of Chinese employees to a participative work environment was examined. Structural equation analysis indicated support for a model in which job satisfaction mediates the relationships between elements of a participative work environment (i.e., tasks performed, the relationships individuals had with their work groups, and the nature of the decision making processes) and employee willingness to cooperate with co‐workers and intention to quit. Task interdependence also had a direct relationship with willingness to cooperate.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Keywords

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