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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Mark Cordano, Robert F. Scherer and Crystal L. Owen

This paper examines attitudes toward women managers in Chile (n=194) and the USA (n=218) using the women as managers scale (WAMS) and a Spanish version of WAMS developed…

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7078

Abstract

This paper examines attitudes toward women managers in Chile (n=194) and the USA (n=218) using the women as managers scale (WAMS) and a Spanish version of WAMS developed for this study. Across both cultures, two coherent measures were labeled “acceptance” and “ability”. No cultural differences in the acceptance of women as managers were discovered. The differences in acceptance were divided solely according to sex. There were differences in the perceived ability of women managers for both the sex and culture variables. The paper then compares the impact of the sex and culture variables. Results show that sex explained approximately three times more variance than culture. These findings can inform both the expatriate woman manager who is likely to encounter friction in interactions with males in many cultures and the human resource manager interested in improving the success of women managers working overseas.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2003

Crystal L. Owen, Robert F. Scherer, Michael Z. Sincoff and Mark Cordano

The objective of the current study was to determine if stereotypical perceptions of women as managers existed among men and women in two different cultural settings, the…

Abstract

The objective of the current study was to determine if stereotypical perceptions of women as managers existed among men and women in two different cultural settings, the U.S. and Chile. Using the Women as Managers Scale (WAMS), 412 participants from the U.S. and Chile responded to questions about their perceptions of women performing managerial roles and tasks. Gender and culture effects were identified at both the multivariate and univariate levels.1 The results showed that male subjects in both cultures had more stereotypical and negative perceptions of women as managers than did female subjects, and the U.S. participants (both male and female) had more positive and less stereotypical perceptions of women as managers than the Chilean participants. Implications for research and practice in cross‐cultural and international management are discussed.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Mark Fafard and Rob Haley

The Peruvian Canon system was designed to collect a percentage of taxed profits from the country's natural resource industries and redistribute these funds into…

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287

Abstract

Purpose

The Peruvian Canon system was designed to collect a percentage of taxed profits from the country's natural resource industries and redistribute these funds into communities that are important to the natural resource extraction process. However, these communities often lack significant basic resources, such as adequate public health facilities and basic medical supplies. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis focusses on the political and economic factors within Peru's Canon distribution system and proposes public policy strategies that could more effectively ensure natural resource profits reach extraction zone communities.

Findings

Policymakers should consider the implementation of policies that require a transparent Canon collection and distribution system. Policies should be developed that mandate an adequate percentage of Canon funds for investment in Peru's public health system.

Research limitations/implications

A significant portion of the available literature on local conditions within natural resource extraction communities and systematic empirical data available are lacking.

Originality/value

This analysis can lead to the development and implementation of public policy that more effectively targets improvements throughout Peru's natural resource communities.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Matthew A. Douglas and Stephen M. Swartz

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether or not early, mid, late career stage truck drivers view the safety regulations differently and how drivers’ regulatory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether or not early, mid, late career stage truck drivers view the safety regulations differently and how drivers’ regulatory attitudes influence their compliance attitudes and intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This survey study is designed to evaluate the differences in truck drivers’ attitudes toward safety regulations across career stages. Moreover, the study applies ordinary least squares path analysis to determine the influence of drivers’ regulatory attitudes on compliance attitudes and intentions.

Findings

Results revealed that drivers in early and late career stages harbor different perceptions of the burden safety regulations place on driving operations, the effectiveness of driver-focused safety regulations in maintaining road safety, and the acceptability of certain unsafe acts. Moreover, drivers’ attitudes toward regulations directly and indirectly influenced compliance attitudes and intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The participant sample was taken from employees of four large motor carriers operating refrigerated and dry box trailers over the road in interstate commerce. While the sample is roughly representative of this segment, the authors recommend caution in generalizing the findings across the diverse US trucking industry as a whole.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that motor carrier management should tailor safety and regulatory familiarization training across career stages. Moreover, carriers should provide targeted communication regarding the effectiveness of regulations and impact of regulations on driving operations in order to alleviate drivers’ negative attitudes toward regulations where possible.

Originality/value

This study marks the first application of career stage theory to the motor carrier safety context. This study also provides further evidence as to the efficacy of drivers’ attitudes toward safety regulations in predicting drivers’ compliance attitudes and intentions. A better understanding of these phenomena may lead to improved compliance and safety.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Matthew A. Douglas and Stephen M. Swartz

The purpose of this paper is to develop a measurement scale to assess over‐the‐road commercial motor vehicle operators' attitudes toward safety regulations.

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1006

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a measurement scale to assess over‐the‐road commercial motor vehicle operators' attitudes toward safety regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of the current USA motor carrier safety literature and general safety literature is conducted to determine the existence of a construct and measurement scale suitable for assessing truck drivers' attitudes toward regulations. As no existing construct is found, a new construct needs to be developed. A rigorous construct development process is conducted to establish the content domain, reliability, and validity of a new construct to measure truck drivers' regulatory attitudes.

Findings

The results of this paper shows a reliable and valid construct to measure truck drivers' perceptions of the general attitude, effectiveness, and enforcement of safety regulations.

Research limitations/implications

This effort is the initial construct development process and use of the construct in theory testing studies is necessary.

Practical implications

The regulatory attitude construct is developed in support of a larger investigation into the behavioral aspects of truck driver safety. The broader study seeks to inform theory and practice as to how the trucking industry's regulatory environment influences truck drivers' safety‐related decisions and behaviors. By identifying the impact of the regulatory environment, safety program managers should be able to direct their educational and training efforts to influence factors that will result in better decisions and safer driving behaviors.

Originality/value

This construct development process marks the first attempt to comprehensively measure truck drivers' attitudes toward safety regulations.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Carol Pomare

This chapter aims at discussing sustainable development goals (SDGs) and entrepreneurship from an economic and social perceptive. More specifically, this chapter aims at…

Abstract

This chapter aims at discussing sustainable development goals (SDGs) and entrepreneurship from an economic and social perceptive. More specifically, this chapter aims at discussing the challenges facing small & medium enterprises (SMEs) applying the goal of ensuring sustainable consumption and production patterns to their day-to-day operations. In this chapter, a synthesis of a field of research related to sustainable developmental goals SDGs and SMEs is provided, with a focus on entrepreneurs who believe their SME needs to act as a “good corporate citizen” with the responsibility to (1) sustain the environment for future generations and (2) care about the well-being of society at large. This field of research is presented to identify important opportunities and challenges for entrepreneurs with SDGs within a Multiple Framework Approach.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Rachelle Cortis and Vincent Cassar

To investigate specific barriers that might be hindering Maltese women from achieving a managerial position.

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6971

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate specific barriers that might be hindering Maltese women from achieving a managerial position.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on research by Cromie. Barriers are classified into two main categories; internal and external barriers. Job‐involvement and work‐based self‐esteem are considered to be internal barriers, whereas attitudes towards women in management are considered to be external barriers. The total population was 200, consisting of male and female middle managers, female and male employees and B. Commerce students.

Findings

Results indicate no differences between job involvement and work‐based self‐esteem of male and female managers. On the other hand, both male employees and students seem to hold more stereotypical attitudes towards women in management than their female counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

One of the basic limitations of this study was the sample size since small samples make it difficult to generalize. Further research may focus on two main areas. First, it would be useful to have qualitative research on the work experiences of female managers to further investigate the various factors that have helped and hindered women thorough their career advancement. Secondly, research on corporate climate can be helpful in identifying organizational practices that might be blocking female career prospects. Finally, a study considering how attitudes can be reshaped through the educational system and through the use of the media can also help to reduce gender stereotypes.

Practical implications

This study indicates that women often have to face several attitudinal barriers, which in turn may explain the lack of female participation in managerial occupations. A change in organizational policies can help women to overcome these barriers.

Originality/value

This paper confirms that, as in several countries, Maltese women are facing several barriers, which are hindering their career prospects. It also highlights the important role of organizations in reducing workplace barriers.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Hélène Cherrier, Sally V. Russell and Kelly Fielding

The aim of this paper is to examine the narratives of acceptance and resistance to the introduction of corporate environmentalism. Despite recognition that managers and…

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2071

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the narratives of acceptance and resistance to the introduction of corporate environmentalism. Despite recognition that managers and senior executives play a primary role in corporate environmentalism, relatively few researchers have examined how top management supports, accepts, negotiates, disregards, or rejects the implementation of corporate environmentalism within their organization. By considering how members of a top management team reflect on corporate environmentalism the aim is to examine potential identity management conflicts that arise during the implementation of environmentally sustainable initiatives within organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted to address the research aims. By taking this approach the paper examines the lived experience of the participants as they internalized corporate environmentalism as part of their identity and as part of the organizational identity. Data collection involved 15 semi‐structured interviews with senior executives and board members of a large Australian hospital.

Findings

Based on an in‐depth thematic analysis of interview transcripts, it was found that individuals attributed a dominant discourse to corporate environmentalism based on their lived experience of organizational change for sustainability. Six dominant discourses were identified. Three were resistant to corporate environmentalism: the pragmatist, the traditionalist, and the observer; and three were supportive of corporate environmentalism: the technocentrist, holist, and ecopreneur.

Originality/value

The findings demonstrate that although top management operated in and experienced the same organizational context, the narratives and identities they constructed in relation to sustainability varied widely. These findings emphasize the challenges inherent in developing an organizational identity that incorporates sustainability principles and the need for change management strategies to appeal to the diverse values and priorities of organizational managers and executives.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Prabanga Thoradeniya, Janet Lee, Rebecca Tan and Aldónio Ferreira

Drawing upon the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of managers’ attitude and other psychological factors on…

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5871

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of managers’ attitude and other psychological factors on sustainability reporting (SR). In doing so, this paper aims to respond to calls for the use of previously untried theoretical approaches on the SR literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a survey of top and middle-level managers of listed and non-listed companies in Sri Lanka. Data were analysed using a Partial Least Squares path model.

Findings

The findings indicate that managers’ attitude towards SR, belief about stakeholder pressure, and their capacity to control SR behaviour influence their intention to engage in SR and, indirectly, actual corporate SR behaviour (in the context of listed companies). However, whilst managers of non-listed companies exhibit the intention to engage in SR, the lack of a relationship between intention and behaviour suggests that companies face barriers towards SR due to lack of actual control over the SR process. Religion, in the case of non-listed companies, and education, in the case of listed companies, has some degree of influence over managers’ beliefs.

Research limitations/implications

The use of self-reported SR behaviour is a limitation but necessary to maintain anonymity of respondents. The low levels of self-reported SR correspond with past evidence on actual SR in developing countries.

Practical implications

The results show that managers’ psychological factors are important in determining SR behaviour in companies. Specifically, this highlights the possible roles that regulators, professional bodies and companies can play in improving educational and cultural influences towards improving the level of SR.

Originality/value

This is the first study to apply the TPB to understand SR behaviour by integrating psychological factors relating to managers’ belief, attitudes and perceptions.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Anwar Allah Pitchay

The present study aims to focus on the management of public listed companies (PLC) in Malaysia. It aims to explore the factors that influence the behavioural intention of…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to focus on the management of public listed companies (PLC) in Malaysia. It aims to explore the factors that influence the behavioural intention of the managers in donating cash waqf (endowment) as part of their organisations’ corporate philanthropy.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of planned behaviour was used, and 701 questionnaires were emailed to PLCs’ managers. Four main variables, i.e. economic attitude, political pressure, perceived behavioural control (PBC) and personal moral obligation, were tested and analysed by using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings showed that the first three variables, attitude, subjective norms and PBC of the management, significantly influenced management’s behavioural intention to donate cash waqf. Nonetheless, the personal moral obligation of the management was found to be insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

One of the main limitations is that it involved only quantitative surveys with managers in Malaysia. In future, the findings of this study can be supported by interviews.

Originality/value

The present study integrates the corporate social responsibility (CSR) fund of Shariah-compliant companies for the development of waqf property. The combination of CSR funds and waqf land will solve the waqf institution’s fund deficit issue. This will optimize waqf land development efficiency and benefit society.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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