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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1923

A.—The following conditions apply to producers only :—

Abstract

A.—The following conditions apply to producers only :—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Mark Constable

The purpose of this paper is to examine the many reports of looting during the response operation in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and assess these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the many reports of looting during the response operation in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and assess these reports against literature which suggests that looting during natural disasters is a myth.

Design/methodology/approach

Media reports of looting from the days following Hurricane Katrina's landfall in New Orleans are compared with previously published evidence of disaster mythology. Questions are raised regarding the legitimacy of these reports and the role of such reports is assessed along with the role that media agencies play in disaster planning and response.

Findings

Media reports of looting in New Orleans appear to be mainly repeated second‐hand accounts. It is likely that there was in fact no looting in the traditional sense. The paper suggests what really happened in terms of theft and poses potential reasons as to the cause thereof. A clear definition of looting is suggested for emergency managers to use in order to separate acts of survival from pure criminal acts.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the dangers for emergency managers in believing common disaster myths. It is a timely reminder of the existence disaster mythology against a recent disaster in a developed country.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Jonathan Merritt

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of the Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) in the UK. The development of the role is charted from its inception under…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of the Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) in the UK. The development of the role is charted from its inception under the Police Reform Act 2002. The present lived experiences of PCSOs, their colleagues and middle to senior managers have been used to assess the likely future direction of the role and responsibilities of these “public auxiliaries”.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with 39 serving officers from three police forces. The corpus of data was analysed for ideal types identified in previous academic work, varying models or complete alternatives.

Findings

It was found that the PCSO role can be viewed as a continuum from what is termed in this piece, a “Junior Enforcer” role with a remit to assist constables to a “Bridge Builder” or uniformed community development worker at the other extreme. The study found that there is a marked drift towards the role of “Junior Enforcer” but that paradoxically this can assist, rather than be an alternative to “Bridge Builder” activities.

Practical implications

A strengthened enforcement role can assist with resolving community issues. The challenge going forward will be to maintain a balance between the extremes of the role. Too few or too less enforcement powers will undermine effectiveness, whereas a concentration on enforcement will ultimately damage the ability of the PCSO to engage with hard‐to‐reach communities.

Originality/value

Very little if any independent fieldwork is being done with UK “quasi‐police”, the most recent major studies having taken place soon after their inception in 2002. Exploration of the experiences of serving officers best illustrates the practical issues legislation, policy and procedure generate.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Kevin Gaston and Jackie A. Alexander

Increasing numbers of people internationally are volunteering their time and expertise to a wide range of public sector and not‐for‐profit organisations. This resource…

Abstract

Increasing numbers of people internationally are volunteering their time and expertise to a wide range of public sector and not‐for‐profit organisations. This resource needs to be organised and managed effectively to realise the potential benefits. Surveys 1,226 male and female volunteer Special Constables and regular officers from five UK police forces. Reports their motivations, experiences, preferences, deployment, training, relationships with full‐time officers, reasons for leaving and factors influencing the decision to rejoin. Identifies demographic factors associated with length of service. Managerial and organisational implications are discussed, particularly the need for detailed, up to date information on the volunteers and their experiences and aspirations to aid recruitment, retention and effective deployment.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1900

In 1899 the medical practitioners of Dublin were confronted with an outbreak of a peculiar and obscure illness, characterised by symptoms which were very unusual. For want…

Abstract

In 1899 the medical practitioners of Dublin were confronted with an outbreak of a peculiar and obscure illness, characterised by symptoms which were very unusual. For want of a better explanation, the disorder, which seemed to be epidemic, was explained by the simple expedient of finding a name for it. It was labelled as “beri‐beri,” a tropical disease with very much the same clinical and pathological features as those observed at Dublin. Papers were read before certain societies, and then as the cases gradually diminished in number, the subject lost interest and was dropped.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

Morgan Davies

The policeman's lot is not a happy one! Or so the saying goes. However, it is probably more accurate to state that little is known about the policeman's lot in general…

Abstract

The policeman's lot is not a happy one! Or so the saying goes. However, it is probably more accurate to state that little is known about the policeman's lot in general. Even though the “office of constable” is as old as the monarchy, the modern police officer tends to have missed the academic scrutiny and analysis that people in most other occupations have undergone. It is for this reason that I have written the following text.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Abstract

Details

Police Occupational Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-055-2

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Helen Wells

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the negotiation of boundaries of strategic vs operational responsibility between Chief Constables and Police Crime Commissioners (PCCs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the negotiation of boundaries of strategic vs operational responsibility between Chief Constables and Police Crime Commissioners (PCCs).

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion reflects on interviews with Chief Constables (n=11) and PCCs (n=11) in matched pairs, exploring the relationship between the two figures, specifically in relation to the issue of the operational independence of the Chief Constable in the new accountability structure.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that experiences vary and depend on the particular personalities and experience of the individuals involved. PCCs were particularly likely to test the boundary of operational vs strategic responsibility in relation to issues which had been brought to their attention by members of their electorate.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could seek a larger sample as it is possible that those areas where real tensions existed declined to participate. Given the findings, it would also be informative to revisit the topic in the run-up to the next PCC elections.

Social implications

The (re)negotiation of boundaries may become the norm given that both roles are subject to reassignment at short notice, and may become particularly salient in the run-up to future PCC elections. Crucial policing decisions which affect everyone are inevitably influenced by these background negotiations.

Originality/value

Previous research has not been based on interviews with both PCCs and their respective Chief Constables, and hence there is dearth of material which reflects on the relationships between these two powerful individuals and their ongoing negotiations of issues with real practical and conceptual implications.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1962

R.D. MACLEOD

Scotland's day of reputation in publishing came with the Foulises, who set a standard not only for Scotland but also for Europe. Robert Foulis, who was inspired by Dr…

Abstract

Scotland's day of reputation in publishing came with the Foulises, who set a standard not only for Scotland but also for Europe. Robert Foulis, who was inspired by Dr. Francis Hutcheson to become bookseller and printer, opened his shop in Glasgow about 1741. He and his brother Andrew had visited the Continent on occasions, devoting themselves to studying the printing houses there. In a letter written by Thomas Innes of the Scots College of Paris, a well‐known Jacobite, to James Edgar, Secretary to the Chevalier de St. George at Rome, he tells about the departure of the brothers from Paris, and says that they returned home by London bringing with them six or seven hogsheads of books they had bought up in France. On their return to Glasgow, Robert opened out as a bookseller, his printers being Urie & Co., a firm some of whose issues are of higher quality than had to that date been achieved in Scotland. There was an obvious leaning to the classical side in the early Foulis publishing, and this inclination increased as the connexion with the University became cemented.

Details

Library Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1906

EVERY librarian in his inmost heart dislikes newspapers. He regards them as bad literature; attractors of undesirable readers; a drain upon the limited resources of the…

Abstract

EVERY librarian in his inmost heart dislikes newspapers. He regards them as bad literature; attractors of undesirable readers; a drain upon the limited resources of the library; and a target against which the detractors of public libraries are constantly battering. From the standpoint of the librarian, newspapers are the most expensive and least productive articles stocked by a library, and their lavish provision is, perhaps, the most costly method of purchasing waste‐paper ever devised. Pressure of circumstances and local conditions combine, however, to muzzle the average librarian, and the consequence is that a perfectly honest and outspoken discussion of the newspaper question is very rarely seen. In these circumstances, an attempt to marshal the arguments for and against the newspaper, together with some account of a successful practical experiment at limitation, may prove interesting to readers of this magazine.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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