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Article

Mark Chandley, Maxine Cromar-Hayes, Dave Mercer, Bridget Clancy, Iain Wilkie and Gary Thorpe

The purpose of this paper is to derive from an on-going, innovative, project to explore the concept, and application, of “recovery” in the care and clinical management of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to derive from an on-going, innovative, project to explore the concept, and application, of “recovery” in the care and clinical management of patients detained in one UK high-security hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising a qualitative, action research, methodology the aim was to involve forensic mental health nurses in a collaborative, client-centred approach to identification and resolution of dilemmas in the process of planning care for offender-patients.

Findings

In this context the authors identify constraints and contradictions involved in employing recovery principles in institutions critics refer to as part of the disciplinary apparatus of psychiatric and social control; where the taken for granted lives, and relations, of an incarcerated population are measured by the calendar, not the clock.

Research limitations/implications

Protective practices remain highly relevant in high-secure practice. Safety, an important value for all can by and large be achieved through recovery approaches. The humanistic elements of recovery can offer up safe and useful methods of deploying the mental health nurse on the ward. Many nurses have the prerequisite approach but there remains a wide scope to enhance those skills. Many see the approach as axiomatic though nurse education often prepares nurses with a biomedical view of the ward.

Practical implications

Currently, philosophical tenets of recovery are enshrined in contemporary health policy and professional directives but, as yet, have not been translated into high-secure settings. Drawing on preliminary findings, attention is given to the value of socially situated approaches in challenging historic dominance of a medical model.

Social implications

It is concluded that recovery could be a forerunner of reforms necessary for the continued relevance of high-secure care into the twenty-first century.

Originality/value

This research is located in high-secure setting. The social situation is marked by the extent of the isolation involved. A value is in this situation. First it is akin to the isolation of the tribe utilised by many anthropologists for their ability to adopt the “social laboratory” status to test out theories of behaviour in industrial society. The authors urge others to utilise this research in this way. Second, the situation represents the locus of so many of societies dilemmas, paradoxes and fears that moral issues morph from what is the mundane in wider society. In this way humanistic approaches are tested via action research with nurses in some rigouous ways.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article

Mark Chandley and Michael Rouski

The authors offer up an example of recovery in a high-secure setting. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how an individual account of recovery and the academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors offer up an example of recovery in a high-secure setting. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how an individual account of recovery and the academic literature offer up related and important perspectives that have serious clinical utility.

Design/methodology/approach

First the context is outlined. The biographical account is then deployed to describe the experience of being detained in an English high-secure facility using recovery as a framework for elucidation. This is often referred to in recovery as accessing the views of the “expert by experience”. In a thematic way this author details his understanding of recovery, what worked and what did not. This account is then contrasted with the academic literature and research at the same site. Social anthropology acts as the theoretical backdrop. This debate informs some clinical implications and issues for practice.

Findings

Recovery can be a highly relevant concept in a high-secure context. The author found that the biographical account of the “patient” can offer the observer some insights for practice. The authors noted that the collective themes of previous research where consistent to this account. The authors found the use of recovery principles helped the person receiving care fulfil his potential. Nevertheless, forensic recovery implies a forensic past. This complicates recovery and placed limits on the own use of the principles.

Social implications

The authors argue that recovery is highly relevant to the context and particularly important to people who are often stigmatized for multiple reasons including their, “illness”, their “crime”, and their social situation. The paper implies that forensic recovery is more problematic than mainstream recovery. Key events mark out issues.

Originality/value

This is the first co-produced paper surrounding recovery in high-secure care.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article

Mark Chandley

Special hospitals are notorious for their social isolation. In this sense they are not unlike tribal societies. These hospitals, like their tribal counterparts, are ripe…

Abstract

Special hospitals are notorious for their social isolation. In this sense they are not unlike tribal societies. These hospitals, like their tribal counterparts, are ripe for local time reckoning to emerge. A previous study that focussed on tribal societies is used here to illustrate socio‐temporal issues ‐ primarily because of their social isolation, which is comparable with the isolation from wider society of the special hospital, a factor that is essential for local time reckoning to emerge at any significant level.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article

The British countryman is a well‐known figure; his rugged, obstinate nature, unyielding and tough; his part in the development of the nation, its history, not confined to…

Abstract

The British countryman is a well‐known figure; his rugged, obstinate nature, unyielding and tough; his part in the development of the nation, its history, not confined to the valley meadows and pastures and uplands, but nobly played in battles and campaigns of long ago. His “better half”—a term as true of yeoman stock as of any other—is less well known. She is as important a part of country life as her spouse; in some fields, her contribution has been even greater. He may grow the food, but she is the provider of meals, dishes, specialties, the innovating genius to whom most if not all British food products, mostly with regional names and now well‐placed in the advertising armentarium of massive food manufacturers, are due. A few of them are centuries old. Nor does she lack the business acumen of her man; hens, ducks, geese, their eggs, cut flowers, the produce of the kitchen garden, she may do a brisk trade in these at the gate or back door. The recent astronomical price of potatoes brought her a handsome bonus. If the basic needs of the French national dietary are due to the genius of the chef de cuisine, much of the British diet is due to that of the countrywoman.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

“It is generally accepted that the food industry must be scientifically based to cope with the problems, particularly of public health, which arise as new processes of…

Abstract

“It is generally accepted that the food industry must be scientifically based to cope with the problems, particularly of public health, which arise as new processes of growing, manufacturing, packaging and preserving food depart even further from traditional ways.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Yasemin Besen and Michael S. Kimmel

The purpose of this paper is to provide an in‐depth understanding of the lived experience of sex discrimination from the perspective of women in the Wal‐Mart case and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an in‐depth understanding of the lived experience of sex discrimination from the perspective of women in the Wal‐Mart case and unravels the daily mechanisms through which sex discrimination takes place.

Design/methodology/approach

One hundred and ten in‐depth statements from women who are current and former employees of Wal‐Mart, describing in detail their work experience, were employed as the main source of data. We have carried out a detailed content analysis of these in‐depth interviews identifying the mechanisms of sex discrimination.

Findings

Findings identify the specific mechanisms through which sex discrimination takes place. In the context of the current sex discrimination case, the paper provides a rich body of evidence in unraveling the everyday mechanisms of sex discrimination. It observes that instead of individual events, at important thresholds, sex discrimination is a result of small, everyday acts and gendered assumptions, which often appear supportive and harmless.

Research limitations/implications

The richness of the data provides the unique, empirical opportunity to observe the process in detail, but this paper focuses exclusively on the process, and the end‐results remain outside the scope of the paper.

Practical implications

The paper provides a very useful source of information and practical advice for women in the labor force in identifying the supportive, nice and harmless mechanisms and everyday experience of sex discrimination.

Originality/value

This paper exclusively focuses on the process and identifies the mechanisms of sex discrimination using a rich source of qualitative data. It offers empirical evidence in identifying the daily assumptions and everyday mechanisms of sex discrimination. Sex discrimination in the everyday lives are carried out in disguise of harmless, nice and often supportive behavior; therefore this paper offers explanations as to why many women stay in these exploitative jobs as long as they do.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Abstract

Details

When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

Content available

Abstract

Details

When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

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