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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Kerry Bodle, Mark Brimble, Scott Weaven, Lorelle Frazer and Levon Blue

The purpose of this paper is to investigate success factors pertinent to the management of Indigenous businesses through the identification of points of intervention at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate success factors pertinent to the management of Indigenous businesses through the identification of points of intervention at the systemic and structural levels. Through this approach, the economic and social values that First Nations communities attach to intangible Indigenous cultural heritage (ICH) and Indigenous cultural intellectual property (ICIP) may be both recognised and realised as assets.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a multidisciplinary approach to address a global issue of economic and social significance to First Nation peoples, their businesses and the Australian Aboriginal communities. The authors adopt a First Nation epistemological standpoint that incorporates theoretical perspectives drawn from a diverse range of fields and theories (Preston, 2013), as well as advocate the use of Indigenist methodology for research with First Nation peoples as it is underpinned by critical race theory.

Findings

The authors argue conceptually that accounting, accountability and auditing consideration are required to fully identify what is impacting the successful management of Indigenous enterprises. Specifically, in relation to accounting, Elders should be included to assist in valuing the intangible ICH and ICIP assets. Furthermore, the authors emphasise the need to improve the financial and commercial literacy levels of Indigenous entrepreneurs.

Practical implications

The authors prescribe the use of tools for the accounting treatment of ICH and ICIP as intangible assets within an Australian regulatory environment and define an auditing process and accountability model incorporating cultural, social and environmental measures. A central tenet of this model relates to improving levels of personal and commercial financial literacy in the First Nation participants. Collectively, these factors promote informed participation and decision-making, and may promulgate more sustainable outcomes.

Social implications

Integrated thinking requires all these factors to be considered in a holistic manner, such that a First Nation enterprise and the wider Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can understand, and make decisions based on, the overall impact it has on all their stakeholders and generally on the society, the environment and the economy.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to Australia’s strategic research priorities of maximising social and economic participation in society and improving the health and well-being of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The authors address the inability of current Western accounting standards, practices and models to suitably account for communally held and protocol-bound intangible Indigenous cultural heritage and Indigenous cultural intellectual property assets.

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Laura de Zwaan, Mark Brimble and Jenny Stewart

Environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks have the potential to negatively impact financial returns, yet few superannuation funds integrate these considerations…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks have the potential to negatively impact financial returns, yet few superannuation funds integrate these considerations into their investment selection. The Cooper Review (2010) identified a lack of member demand as a key impediment to ESG investing by superannuation funds. Given this problem, the aim of this study is to explore superannuation fund members’ perceptions of ESG investing by their funds in order to identify reasons for the lack of demand.

Design/methodology/approach

An on-line survey was developed and distributed to assess possible reasons why members do not select ESG investment options. In total, 549 Australian superannuation fund members responded to the survey.

Findings

Results indicate that the majority of superannuation fund members are interested in ESG investing. Members lack awareness of their fund’s approach to ESG investing, and they do not perceive there to be a financial penalty from ESG investing. Finally, members show a preference for consideration of governance issues over both social and environmental issues.

Research limitations/implications

Respondents are well educated and the majority did not choose their superannuation fund. There was no measure of financial literacy included in the research instrument. There is also a general limitation in surveying superannuation fund members when they lack knowledge about superannuation.

Practical implications

The results indicate that superannuation members are interested in both superannuation and ESG investing. Given the low take-up of ESG investment options, this finding raises the question of how effectively funds are engaging their members.

Social implications

The results should be of interest to superannuation funds and may lead to renewed interest in promoting ESG products.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine superannuation members’ attitudes and behaviours towards ESG investing in the context of superannuation. The study also adds to our understanding of member decision-making in the $1.8 trillion superannuation industry.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Shadi Farshadfar, Chew Ng and Mark Brimble

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative predictive ability of earnings, cash flow from operations as reported in the cash flow statement, and two traditional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative predictive ability of earnings, cash flow from operations as reported in the cash flow statement, and two traditional measures of cash flows (i.e. earnings plus depreciation and amortisation expense, and working capital from operations) in forecasting future cash flows for Australian companies. Further, an empirical investigation of the extent to which firm size, as a contextual factor, influences the predictability of earnings and cash flow from operations is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' sample includes 323 companies listed on the Australian Stock Exchange between 1992 and 2004 (3,512 firm‐years). They employ the ordinary least squares and fixed‐effects approaches to estimate their regression models. To evaluate the forecasting performance of the regression models, both within‐sample and out‐of‐sample forecasting tests are employed.

Findings

The authors provide evidence that reported cash flow from operations has more power in predicting future cash flows than earnings and traditional cash flow measures. Further, the predictability of both earnings and cash flow from operations significantly increases with firm size. However, the superiority of cash flow from operations to earnings in predicting future cash flows is robust across small, medium and large firms.

Originality/value

The authors' results, in terms of firm size, imply that the users of accounting information should be cautious in assessing the utility of earnings and cash flow measures in forecasting future cash flows as firm size decreases.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Imran Tahir and Mark Brimble

In the past decade, there has been strong growth in Islamic finance and banking across the globe, there is little empirical evidence on the impact of religiosity on…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past decade, there has been strong growth in Islamic finance and banking across the globe, there is little empirical evidence on the impact of religiosity on financial decisions. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an experimental design to investigate the investment behaviours of a group of Muslims.

Findings

The paper finds that Islam does influence investment behaviour, however, the degree to which it does this is influenced by the degree of religiosity of the individual. In addition, evidence is found of “Western style” wealth maximisation amongst Muslim investors as well as a desire to consider sustainable investment principles in asset allocations.

Research limitations/implications

These findings have implications for investors, financial advisors, and policy makers.

Originality/value

The paper is original its use of the experimental design to test the impact of religiosity in the context of investment decisions by Muslims.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Mark Brimble and Allan Hodgson

This paper aims to examine the contemporary association between accounting information and a number of measures of systematic (beta) risk that incorporate dynamic market…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the contemporary association between accounting information and a number of measures of systematic (beta) risk that incorporate dynamic market features. The goal is to determine the fundamental accounting drivers of beta and to assess whether their explanatory variable power has changed or declined over time.

Design/methodology/approach

Beta estimates are calculated using adjustments for thin‐trading, central tendency, leverage, and time variance. Accounting risk variables are derived from theoretical foundations and prior empirical research, and classified as operating, financial or growth.

Findings

Results show a strong association between accounting variables (operating and growth) and systematic risk that is consistent over time, but with some industry and size differences and possible country effects. Accounting variables are able to capture dynamic risk shifts and generally are able to outperform naïve M‐GARCH and industry betas in predicting next year's systematic risk.

Practical implications

Internal management and external decision making enable the development of more efficient ex‐post risk measures, isolating actual risk determinants rather than just determining the level of risk, overcoming the problem that conventional ex‐post measures cannot be used for non‐listed entities, initial public offering firms, or those that do not have sufficient trading history, reduces the noise found in traditional risk estimates that rely on historical security returns, and the development of trading and valuation strategies.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that assesses the association between a range of dynamic risk measures and accounting variables and tests whether this long‐run association has changed over time.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

M. Kabir Hassan

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1972

First January 1973 will not only mark the beginning of a New Year but a year which history will mark as a truly momentous one, for this is the year that Britain, after…

Abstract

First January 1973 will not only mark the beginning of a New Year but a year which history will mark as a truly momentous one, for this is the year that Britain, after centuries of absence, re‐enters the framework of Europe as one of the Member‐States of the enlarged European Community. This in itself must make for change on both sides; Britain is so different in outlook from the others, something they too realize and see as an acquisition of strength. There have been other and more limited forms of Continental union, mainly of sovereignty and royal descent. Large regions of France were for centuries under the English Crown and long after they were finally lost, the fleur de lis stayed on the royal coat of arms, until the Treaty of Amiens 1802, when Britain retired behind her sea curtain. The other Continental union was, of course, with Hanover; from here the Germanized descendants of the Stuarts on the female line returned to the throne of their ancestors. This union lasted until 1832 when rules of descent prevented a woman from reigning in Hanover. It is interesting to speculate how different history might have been if only the British Crown and the profits of Tudor and Stuart rule had been maintained in one part of central Europe. However, Britain disentangled herself and built up overwhelming sea power against a largely hostile Europe, of which it was never conceived she could ever be a part, but the wheel of chance turns half‐circle and now, this New Year, she enters into and is bound to a European Community by the Treaty of Rome with ties far stronger, the product of new politico‐economic structures evolved from necessity; in a union which cannot fail to change the whole course of history, especially for this country.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 74 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Jason Lee Carter

Thailand desires to improve its economic competitiveness in the Southeast Asia-Pacific region and utilizes the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report (GCR…

Abstract

Purpose

Thailand desires to improve its economic competitiveness in the Southeast Asia-Pacific region and utilizes the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report (GCR) on the 12 Pillars of Competitiveness to gauge this progress. The purpose of this paper is to study the outcomes for the fifth pillar on “Higher education and training” to identify the challenges to institutional management for the design and implementation of business administration programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The first hypothesis on causality and impact is a comparison of curricula design from published material between Thai and similar highly rated programs from the GCR using a statistical variance method. The second hypothesis is a proposed improvement model for implementation, geocentralization, analyzed using an inferential percentage differentiation.

Findings

The findings reveal a marked misalignment in relevant vs irrelevant curriculum design, with implementation performance results showing lower outcomes from traditional learning methods as compared to geocentralization.

Originality/value

Final remarks outline recommendations that Thai higher education administrators can utilize for improving curriculum design and implementation.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1956

R.A. WATSON

My contribution to the afternoon's discussion is confined to some thoughts on the multiplicity of journals. We have heard the definition of a periodical, but my own…

Abstract

My contribution to the afternoon's discussion is confined to some thoughts on the multiplicity of journals. We have heard the definition of a periodical, but my own favourite definition is that of the first to be published in Britain, the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. Its avowed purpose was to be ‘A convenient Register for the bringing in and preserving of many experiments, which, not enough for a book, would else be lost’.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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