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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Mark Bannan and Lynn Watson

A partnership of agencies in South West England commissioned a review of supported housing, with the primary aim of linking supported housing (and the Supporting People…

Abstract

A partnership of agencies in South West England commissioned a review of supported housing, with the primary aim of linking supported housing (and the Supporting People programme) with other regional strategies and initiatives such as housing, health, crime reduction and community safety. The review produced a new conceptual framework for the planning and management of housing and support services, with a strong emphasis on aims and outcomes. It also brought together data on current services across the region and identified key trends and issues to be addressed. Many of the recommendations and proposals have been incorporated into the draft Regional Housing Strategy, due to be finalised in May 2005.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2019

Bob Langert

Abstract

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The Battle to Do Good
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-815-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Paul Nieuwenhuysen and Patrick Vanouplines

This guest editorial forms a brief introduction to an issue of The Electronic Library which focuses on libraries and the World Wide Web. To start with, the basics and…

Abstract

This guest editorial forms a brief introduction to an issue of The Electronic Library which focuses on libraries and the World Wide Web. To start with, the basics and state of the art of the World Wide Web are outlined in general. Then, the high and increasingly important impact of the Web on libraries is discussed.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Rosie Stacy, Katie Brittain and Sandra Kerr

Singing for health may be an idea whose time has come. The interest in music in relation to health is evident in medical and health‐care research. This paper reviews ways…

Abstract

Singing for health may be an idea whose time has come. The interest in music in relation to health is evident in medical and health‐care research. This paper reviews ways in which music and singing relate to health and healing, historically and cross‐culturally, and shows that music forms a part of the healing systems of many cultures. The paper reviews research on the links between music and health. They include studies that suggest that music has profound effects on the emotions, for example, inducing states of relaxation which are particularly useful as an antidote to depression, anxiety and fatigue. Music has also been shown to enhance physical health through improvements to breathing capacity, muscle tension and posture and the reduction of respiratory symptoms. It may also contribute to social health through the management of self‐identity and interpersonal relationships. The paper explores theories that are beginning to develop about the mechanisms that mediate music for health, including the possible connections between immuno‐suppression, stress reduction, and music. The paper goes on to discuss the role of singing with early years children and community groups of adults. A resurgence of traditional music‐making and voice work in community settings is taking place across the UK, and the paper reviews several community‐based initiatives.

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Health Education, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 1999

Gloria Rohmann

Abstract

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-876-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Miller Dispersion Equipment is designing and manufacturing novel blades in Australia, which it claims are set to have a huge impact on the use of high speed dispersers for…

Abstract

Miller Dispersion Equipment is designing and manufacturing novel blades in Australia, which it claims are set to have a huge impact on the use of high speed dispersers for the combining of dry and fluid solids.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Isabel Rimanoczy

The purpose of this paper is to compare action learning and action reflection learning (ARL), exploring the similarities and differences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare action learning and action reflection learning (ARL), exploring the similarities and differences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a bibliographic search through ProQuest to collect scholarly journal publications on the definition and evolution of action learning; scholarly dissertations on ARL and their bibliographic references applying to this comparison. The origins of both action learning and ARL are explored. Action learning is first compared with ARL, using the taxonomy of Rimanoczy of ARL's principles and elements. Then ARL is compared with the characteristics listed for action learning by Smith and O'Neil.

Findings

As a result of this double comparison, a list of commonalities and differences is established. The comparison indicates that, while there are action‐learning aspects in some of the ARL‐based interventions, the eclectic characteristics developed by practitioners convert ARL into a learning architecture that brings together best professional practices described in various theoretical lines.

Originality/value

This paper offers guidelines to designing and implementing learning interventions in a wide scope of contexts.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Chris Abbott

Definitions of assistive technology are varied and sometimes contradictory and this raises particular issues for a new Journal seeking to address this area. A preference…

Abstract

Definitions of assistive technology are varied and sometimes contradictory and this raises particular issues for a new Journal seeking to address this area. A preference for loose and wide definitions is seen as leading to a more inclusive grasp of the field. Disability itself is a contested concept and this has affected the approach taken to technology use for groups that have been identified as having special educational needs. A key focus of the Journal of Assistive Technologies is on the practices of technology use, rather than the tools themselves, and this is discussed in the light of the social model of inclusion. The use of the term e‐Inclusion leads to a discussion of a tentative taxonomy of this area: technology to train and rehearse; technology to assist learning and technology to enable learning. Practitioners and researchers from a range of backgrounds are invited to contribute to the debates raised in this article.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Yiye Han and Steven Yates

Monash University Library (MUL) has embraced eLearning as a strategy in its contribution to information research and learning skills development within the university. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Monash University Library (MUL) has embraced eLearning as a strategy in its contribution to information research and learning skills development within the university. The purpose of this paper is to describe an evaluation of the implementation of the strategy with recommendations for sustaining and improving practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The evaluation is divided into four categories using a mixed methods methodology for evidence gathering. Quantitative and qualitative data are obtained from both primary and secondary sources for an enriched understanding of practices.

Findings

Findings suggest that library staff have gained knowledge and skills indicating a sustainable strategy. However, further work is required to sustain staff development and support staff requirements in the long term.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited by its wide focus. Although this is mostly resolved through the use of multiple data collection methods, the thoroughness of the evaluation may have suffered while attempting to be comprehensive.

Practical implications

The conclusions of this evaluation as well as methods of its execution can be shared with other institutions wishing to produce eLearning resources in a sustainable and effective manner.

Originality/value

MUL develops its eLearning resources in-house, whereas many other institutions outsource. The findings of this case study could be viewed as a positive indication of this in-house practice, which in turn might inform other organisations who are looking for a financially beneficial eLearning alternative.

Details

Library Management, vol. 37 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Frank Fitzpatrick

Abstract

Details

Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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