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Article

Mark J. Ahn, Amir Shaygan and Charles Weber

Using a dynamic capabilities lens, this paper aims to study the impact of genomics generally and gene therapy specifically on the rare disease sector of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a dynamic capabilities lens, this paper aims to study the impact of genomics generally and gene therapy specifically on the rare disease sector of the biopharmaceutical industry.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, 24 genomics-based, rare disease-focused biopharma companies were studied and several variables were tested with respect to enterprise value growth. The companies were analyzed as a group of rare disease firms, as well as by size.

Findings

The authors found that number of employees, revenues, number of pipeline and marketed products and retained earnings are strongly correlated (in that order) with enterprise value in rare disease focused biopharma companies. These correlations seem to be weaker as a company’s market capitalization size decreases, indicating that there tends to be increasing returns to scale.

Research limitations/implications

This study found that increasing rates of cumulative returns to enterprise value growth depends on accumulating knowledge-based employees and expanding product portfolios of disruptive genomics-based technologies for treating rare diseases. Aggregating skilled and innovative employees (especially in bigger companies) can be seen as a cumulative bolstering factor in leveraging dynamic capabilities which can be recognized, understood and transformed into commercial success (i.e. increasing returns in enterprise value). In other words, technology managers’ job is to manage not only the financial aspects of the technology but also human resources, asset configuration and strategic alliances efficiently toward faster and better innovation. Strong dynamic capabilities can be formed with the accumulation of experience, articulation and codification of knowledge and an adaptive ability to change the way they solve problems as their environment transforms.

Originality/value

This is the first study to demonstrate and measure a relationship between dynamic capabilities and enterprise value in genomics-based rare disease firms. Further, this study highlights the importance of building the capability and capacity to absorb expertise and accumulate knowledge for new product innovations and sustainable competitive advantage in industries characterized by disruptive innovation.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article

Lee Dunham, Mark Ahn and Anne S. York

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the gap between the resources required to build a strong biotechnology ecosystem in Nebraska and the perception of resources…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the gap between the resources required to build a strong biotechnology ecosystem in Nebraska and the perception of resources currently available within the state for doing so.

Design/methodology/approach

Using resource‐based theory along with data from a Battelle survey commissioned by BioNebraska, the authors first identify the human and financial capital needed to support a viable biotechnology industry sector, benchmarking with other regions currently undertaking such development. The authors then compare identified resource requirements with data from a survey of BioNebraska members regarding their perceptions of the importance of these resources to, and their availability within, Nebraska.

Findings

This process revealed gaps in several key resource areas that could impede the state's ability to achieve its sector development goals.

Practical implications

In the authors' view, understanding the gap between resources required and resources available for building a high technology industry sector, as well as benchmarking against the competition, are key first steps in developing successful economic policy.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the implications of gaps in several key resource areas for future success and makes recommendations for possible ways in which Nebraska decision makers might develop necessary resources. Also addressed is the importance of considering the perceptions of key stakeholders and decision makers regarding the resources required for developing knowledge industries such as biotechnology.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article

Mark J. Ahn, Ashish Hajela and Mohammad Akbar

Building a bioeconomy requires efficient technology transfer and global linkages to exploit finite intellectual property exclusivity periods. Using a resource‐based view…

Abstract

Purpose

Building a bioeconomy requires efficient technology transfer and global linkages to exploit finite intellectual property exclusivity periods. Using a resource‐based view lens, this paper aims to assess the priorities, capabilities, and competitiveness of the emerging bioeconomy in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A triangulated design was used that involved interviews, case studies and a survey of 61 India biotechnology industry participants.

Findings

Two high priority capabilities were identified as being critical to fostering a competitive bioeconomy – access to talent and access to funding. Participants also identified the critical role of government in building and coordinating infrastructure, enabling critical capabilities, and accelerating bi‐directional technology and capital flows. This study reinforces the resource‐based view strategy framework regarding the importance of local context for biotechnology research.

Practical implications

Implications include the need for public‐private sector collaboration to strengthen industry infrastructure and enable biotechnology start‐ups, partnering between academia and government to accelerate technology transfer, and importance of seeking international investment and alliances early in a company's lifecycle to ensure sustainability.

Originality/value

These India‐centric lessons may be valuable in advancing knowledge for building successful biotechnology clusters, particularly for emerging market countries.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Book part

Anne S. York, Lee M. Dunham and Mark Ahn

Declining productivity and disappointing lack of profitability after three decades of biotechnology commercialization, despite enormous investment and the great promise of…

Abstract

Declining productivity and disappointing lack of profitability after three decades of biotechnology commercialization, despite enormous investment and the great promise of breakthrough solutions, have led researchers to question whether traditional horizontal acquisition strategies result in superior firm performance. Our chapter explores the answer to this question as well as to the role that disclosure plays in this important emerging industry. Using standard event study methodology, we examine differences in market performance of vertical versus horizontal acquisition strategies, along with the role played by the amount of information disclosed in the announcement. Our results suggest that vertical acquisitions underperform horizontal acquisitions, with the amount of disclosure playing a role in the market's ability to react to a firm's acquisition strategy accurately and quickly. Our results suggest that accountants who have called for additional disclosure, especially in complex industries such as biopharma, are correct in assuming that nonfinancial information plays a significant role in investors’ valuation of an acquisition event. Managers of biopharma firms, however, are cautioned that more disclosure, through the reduction of uncertainty, may result in lower market valuations for acquirers.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-196-1

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Article

Mark J. Ahn, Michael Meeks, Rebecca Bednarek, Christine Ross and Sophie Dalziel

Building a bioeconomy requires efficient technology transfer and global linkages to exploit finite intellectual property exclusivity periods. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Building a bioeconomy requires efficient technology transfer and global linkages to exploit finite intellectual property exclusivity periods. The purpose of this paper, using a resource‐based view lens, is to assess the priorities, capabilities, and competitiveness of the emerging New Zealand (NZ) bioeconomy.

Design/methodology/approach

A triangulated design was used that involved four focus groups, 27 interviews, five case studies, and survey of 176 NZ biotechnology industry participants from a broad range of backgrounds such as scientists, managers, and investors.

Findings

Two high‐priority capabilities were identified as being critical to fostering a competitive bioeconomy – access to talent and access to funding. Participants also identified the critical role of government in building and coordinating infrastructure, enabling critical capabilities, and accelerating bi‐directional technology and capital flows.

Originality/value

Most biotechnology research and data has focused on the USA and European Union. This is one of the first studies of NZ biotechnology participants, and insights gained within this context are potentially applicable for increasing our understanding of building biotechnology industries outside established clusters.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article

Mark J. Ahn and Larry Ettner

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of cultural intelligence in MBA curricula. Shaping global corporate culture that manifests itself in powerful‐shared…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of cultural intelligence in MBA curricula. Shaping global corporate culture that manifests itself in powerful‐shared values, group behavior, and persists despite changes in‐group membership is decisive to organizational performance. In turn, cultural intelligence (CQ), defined, as an individual's capability to function and manage effectively in culturally diverse settings, has recently emerged as a likely indicator of management ability and leadership potential.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilized the Cultural Intelligence Scale (CQS) – metacognitive, cognitive, motivational, and behavioral – to capture data from MBA students attending three universities in the USA.

Findings

These results, coupled with the open‐ended survey responses, suggest that in general the students have a firm understanding on why CQ is essential in an increasingly globalized business world, as well as a strong desire to interact with other cultures. However, although students appear highly motivated to study about other cultures, the results indicate that many of the MBA students lack an in‐depth knowledge of the values, beliefs, and practices of other cultures. Further, the data suggest that the most important attributes that increase an individual's CQ are international work experience, learning an additional language other than English, and/or obtaining an undergraduate degree from a foreign country.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to examine the role of cultural intelligence in MBA curricula.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article

Mark J. Ahn, Larry W. Ettner and Amanda Loupin

Using a values‐based leadership perspective, the paper aims to explore the Aeneid, Virgil's foundation epic of the Latin canon. Specifically, it aims to analyse the Aeneid

Abstract

Purpose

Using a values‐based leadership perspective, the paper aims to explore the Aeneid, Virgil's foundation epic of the Latin canon. Specifically, it aims to analyse the Aeneid in order to juxtapose the resonant leadership elements of vision, culture and values – and their corresponding equivalent Roman themes of fatum, pietas, and virtus.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a thematic analysis approach, the Aeneid was coded for key leadership themes; and a mixed‐method research framework was employed to juxtapose the leadership lessons identified to the demands of modern leadership.

Findings

The paper finds resonating elements of a compelling vision and strong culture – and coded the following eight values: integrity, good judgment, leadership by example, decision making, trust, justice/fairness, humility, and sense of urgency – in the Aeneid. Whether viewed qualitatively or quantitatively – or across sectors (i.e. for profit, non profit, government) – the findings of this study affirm the explicit relevance of the Aeneid to the demands of modern leadership. Moreover, integrity was found to be a superordinate value – without which the remaining values have far less significance.

Originality/value

This research highlights a leadership paradox – while managerial traits are an important consideration for the prevailing operational context in the short term, a values‐based approach to hiring, promoting and retaining leaders may be superior in achieving organizational sustainability and performance over the long term. This study illustrates the practical contemporary relevance of the Aeneid specifically, and illustrates a humanities laden and values‐based approach to reflecting on leadership effectiveness generally.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article

Mark J. Ahn, Lesley Frederikson, Barry Borman and Rebecca Bednarek

This study seeks to measure the public knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to eye health and disease in New Zealand (NZ).

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to measure the public knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to eye health and disease in New Zealand (NZ).

Design/methodology/approach

A 22‐item survey of 507 adults in NZ was conducted. The survey was developed using interviews and focus groups, as well as comparisons with other benchmark international studies.

Findings

Overall awareness about the importance of eye health is high in NZ, although knowledge about associated diseases (e.g. macular degeneration) is low – this is particularly important, given the risk and cost of preventable vision impairment.

Originality/value

This consumer survey of eye health in NZ, which assessed awareness and access to eye care, provides a foundation for those involved in the provision of eye care health. It is also a first step to further exploring key issues and identifying longitudinal patterns for consumer, provider, and public health dialogue, as well as a baseline for public health campaigns.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Mark J. Ahn, Kathryn Sutherland and Rebecca Bednarek

This paper seeks to demonstrate the value and critical importance of negotiating skills within the wider context of “employability”. It posits that the intensity, rich…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to demonstrate the value and critical importance of negotiating skills within the wider context of “employability”. It posits that the intensity, rich context, and ambiguity of juxtaposing ancient and modern cases provides a creative, engaging format to stimulate learning about negotiating and power among parties.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is the culmination of teaching undergraduate and graduate business students, as well as continuing education courses, in the USA and New Zealand respectively. The authors developed a participatory, mixed‐mode educational simulation. Using thematic analysis of student survey responses, they summarize learning points associated with the suggested teaching case.

Findings

An analysis of post‐exercise questions suggested six key themes identified by students: value of leadership, self‐knowledge, maturity, and judgment; need for creativity, versatility, and adaptability in bridging differences; focus on settlement (rather than absolute win‐lose scenarios); managing risk due to uncertainty and unidentified incentives among participants; dire consequences of inflexibility, self‐righteousness, and unhealthy ego; and need for increasing negotiating skill proficiency is valuable and timeless.

Practical implications

The outlined teaching case is put forward as providing a creative, interesting and rich format to stimulate learning about negotiating and power among parties, as well as team dynamics.

Originality/value

The paper outlines a novel teaching tool that allows students to learn and appreciate the dynamics of negotiating in complex environments.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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