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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2000

Michael Tracey and Mark A. Vonderembse

Supply chain management is becoming critical as firms recognize that competition is shifting from company versus company to supply chain versus supply chain. Two important…

Abstract

Supply chain management is becoming critical as firms recognize that competition is shifting from company versus company to supply chain versus supply chain. Two important factors in building successful supplier relations are (1) defining criteria to select and evaluate suppliers and (2) involving suppliers in important, inter‐company decisions. This research describes the relationships between these factors and supplier performance and between supplier performance and manufacturing performance. It develops and administers a large‐sample survey and uses factor analysis to develop measures for the importance of supplier‐selection criteria, supplier involvement, supplier performance, and manufacturing performance. The results indicate that importance of supplier‐selection criteria and the use of supplier involvement have direct and significant impacts on supplier performance and that supplier performance has a direct and significant impact on manufacturing performance.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Qingyu Zhang, Mark A. Vonderembse and Mei Cao

To respond to increasing environmental uncertainty, manufacturers are enhancing flexible manufacturing competence (FMC) as a source of competitive advantage. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

To respond to increasing environmental uncertainty, manufacturers are enhancing flexible manufacturing competence (FMC) as a source of competitive advantage. This study aims to extend research on FMC to its antecedent variables by investigating the impacts of advanced manufacturing technology and operations improvement practices (OIP) on FMC.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 273 manufacturing firms, this research tests additive, mediating, and moderating models that relate these variables.

Findings

Among three alternative models, the moderating model is best supported. The results indicate that advanced manufacturing technology has a stronger positive impact on FMC when OIP are effectively implemented than when they are not.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses attention on the antecedent variables to production competence, rather than on the concept and positive performance effect of production competence.

Practical implications

For managers, the issue is not simply purchasing automation but developing OIP to effectively use advanced manufacturing technologies, thereby achieving the magnifying effects of human capital on FMC.

Originality/value

This paper investigates FMC and its antecedent variables by testing three alternative models, and it offers assistance to managers who are implementing advanced manufacturing technologies and OIP.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Qingyu Zhang, Mark A. Vonderembse and Jeen‐Su Lim

To respond to an increasingly uncertain environment, firms are seeking to enhance flexibility across the value chain. Spanning flexibility, a critical dimension of value…

Abstract

Purpose

To respond to an increasingly uncertain environment, firms are seeking to enhance flexibility across the value chain. Spanning flexibility, a critical dimension of value chain flexibility, is the ability of a firm to provide horizontal information connections across the value chain to meet a variety of customer needs. This research organizes literature on spanning flexibility and classifies it according to competence and capability theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collected data from 273 manufacturing executives related to spanning flexibility. The instruments used to collect these data have been validated via literature review and structured interviews with executives. Structural equation modeling was applied to these data to test relationships among the variables in the study.

Findings

This study develops valid and reliable instruments to measure the sub‐dimensions of spanning flexibility. The results indicate strong, positive, and direct relationships between flexible spanning competence and capability, and between flexible spanning capability and customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper describes a framework to explore the relationships among flexible competence (supply chain information dissemination flexibility), flexible capability (strategy development flexibility), and customer satisfaction.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Paul C. Hong, David D. Dobrzykowski and Mark A. Vonderembse

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of specific supply chain information technologies (IT) for e‐commerce, e‐procurement, and enterprise resource planning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of specific supply chain information technologies (IT) for e‐commerce, e‐procurement, and enterprise resource planning (ERP), when implementing lean practices to achieve mass customization (MC) performance. The study further investigates how these technologies may be deployed differently in product and service focused contexts. “Best practices” of high performing MC firms are also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey method was employed to collect data from 711 firms in 23 countries. Exploratory factor analysis was employed to establish simple factor structure and construct validity. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze relationships between lean practices, IT use, and MC performance in aggregated and bifurcated samples of product and service focused manufacturers. T‐tests were used to examine differences between the practices employed by high and low MC performers.

Findings

Findings suggest that lean practices can reasonably predict MC performance. In this context, of lean practices, e‐commerce and e‐procurement reasonably predict MC performance. ERP is not shown to predict MC performance. Results suggest that e‐commerce use is a better predictor of performance than e‐procurement or ERP for service focused manufacturers. E‐commerce and e‐procurement appear to be reasonable predictors of MC performance in product manufacturers, while ERP is not. “Best practices” related to lean practices, e‐commerce, e‐procurement, and ERP emerge among high MC performers.

Originality/value

This paper describes what is believed to be the first study to examine these three IT approaches in the context of lean practices and supply chain MC performance. This paper also contributes to the growing interest in differences among product and service focused manufacturing firms. Finally, specific “best practices” are provided to add value for practitioners.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Mark A. Vonderembse and T.S. Raghunathan

Posits that advocates of quality function deployment (QFD) claim that it leads to better product designs, lower product costs, and shorter development times. Presents a

Abstract

Posits that advocates of quality function deployment (QFD) claim that it leads to better product designs, lower product costs, and shorter development times. Presents a study which aims to learn if organizations that apply QFD to product development achieve these benefits. Data from a survey of 80 QFD projects undertaken by 40 firms are used to examine these critical relationships. When leaders from these project teams were asked to compare results from product development efforts without QFD to results with QFD, they claimed that product designs and customer satisfaction improved significantly with QFD. Product costs and time‐to‐market showed only modest improvements. Benefits in time and costs may increase as QFD teams get better training and more experience. Describes the development and costing of a model of QFD implementation issues, product development outcomes, and customer satisfaction. Concludes that QFD’s implementation issues, specifically the organizational dimensions, have a significant impact on product design outcomes and resource consumption.

Details

International Journal of Quality Science, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8538

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Hassan R. HassabElnaby, Woosang Hwang and Mark A. Vonderembse

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the implementation of ERP impacts both business strategy and organizational capabilities which in turn enhance firm…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the implementation of ERP impacts both business strategy and organizational capabilities which in turn enhance firm performance. Specifically, the paper investigates the mediating effect of business strategy and organizational capabilities on the relationship between ERP implementation and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data collected from more than 400 firms, this study tests the relationships among these variables.

Findings

ERP implementation has a positive impact when a firm employs a prospector business strategy. A prospector business strategy enhances the firm's ability to achieve organizational capabilities and enables the firm to achieve higher levels of financial performance.

Practical implications

ERP implementation encourages and supports a prospector strategy. ERP not only supports cost control, but also supports new product development and introductions. The prospector firm seeks better information to support decision making, develop new and innovative products that drive revenue growth, and build efficient and effective operations that enhance return on assets.

Originality/value

This paper reports the mediating effect of business strategy and organizational capabilities on the relationship between ERP implementation and firm performance. This study uses cybernetic control, resource‐based view of firm, and dynamic capabilities theories to develop and integrate this research.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Kun Liao, Thomas W. Sharkey, T.S. Ragu‐Nathan and Mark Vonderembse

The purpose of this paper is to identify relationships among buyer‐supplier trust, joint operational activities, and the degree of mass customization as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify relationships among buyer‐supplier trust, joint operational activities, and the degree of mass customization as well as the interactions between cultural factors (i.e. long‐term strategic alignment and autonomy) and trust in the context of supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

The model of trust is based on joint operational activities and mass customization using theories of social capital and the resource‐based view of the firm. Also, culture‐related antecedents of trust are identified. Based on 208 responses from suppliers in the USA and China, this study uses structural equation modeling to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study empirically supports the notion that trust positively drives manufacturer‐supplier activities in operations. It also supports the claim that joint operational activities contribute to mass customization capabilities in a significant way. Moreover, two culture‐related antecedents are found to be significantly related to trust.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is limited to the auto industry in North America and China. As in other supply chain studies, individual respondents may have somewhat limited information about different aspects of their company's supply chain.

Practical implications

In general, it appears that trust is important in determining mass customization capabilities regardless of culture. For practitioners, long‐term strategic alignment is more important for firms to increase trust than autonomy although both can significantly increase the level of trust between buyer and supplier.

Originality/value

Long‐term strategic alignment and autonomy are identified as antecedents of trust and empirically supported.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Michael Tracey, Jeen‐Su Lim and Mark A. Vonderembse

The purpose of this article is to empirically test the impact of supply‐chain management (SCM) capabilities on business performance so as to determine to what degree…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to empirically test the impact of supply‐chain management (SCM) capabilities on business performance so as to determine to what degree customer‐oriented SCM issues influence competitive position and organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A rigorous methodology is employed to generate a reliable and valid measurement instrument. Responses from 474 manufacturing managers are then utilized to test a causal model using LISREL®.

Findings

The results indicate significant positive relationships exist among three types of SCM capabilities (outside‐in, inside‐out, and spanning) and business performance (perceived customer value, customer loyalty, market performance, and financial performance).

Practical implications

The article demonstrates that strategically developing SCM capabilities such as efficient inbound and outbound transportation, warehousing, and inventory control, production support, packaging, purchasing, order processing, and information dissemination enable a manufacturing firm to identify and take advantage of opportunities in the global marketplace.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was drawn from manufacturing firms in the USA across four SIC codes. Future studies could collect more extensive data to confirm, refine, and expand upon the model presented and the associated construct measures utilizing confirmatory factor analysis. Extending the research to include additional industries and firms from outside of the USA would enhance the generalizability and usefulness of the findings.

Originality/value

The paper statistically validates that managers should regard the cultivation of SCM capabilities as a proprietary resource that facilitates competitive advantage. It also contributes a concise instrument that may be used by academics interested in the areas of supply‐chain management processes and firm performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Qingyu Zhang, Mark A. Vonderembse and Jeen‐Su Lim

To succeed in an uncertain environment, firms must respond to changing customer needs, and logistics flexibility is an important part of the response. This paper defines…

Abstract

Purpose

To succeed in an uncertain environment, firms must respond to changing customer needs, and logistics flexibility is an important part of the response. This paper defines logistics flexibility, creates a framework to understand it, and shows how it relates to customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a large sample survey (n=273) from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers to develop valid and reliable instruments to measure logistics flexibility and to test the relationships among the variables using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate strong, positive, and direct relationships between flexible logistics competence and capability, and between flexible logistics capability and customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The dependent and independent variables were measured through a single respondent, which may introduce common‐method bias. The respondents were manufacturing executives, which provides only a single perspective.

Practical implications

The dichotomy of flexible logistics competence and capability can help managers differentiate between the elements of logistics flexibility that are critical to customers from the elements that support these capabilities. Standing alone, flexible competence may not be sufficient to build a sustainable competitive edge.

Originality/value

The paper organizes literature on logistics flexibility and classifies it according to competence and capability theory. It describes a framework to explore the relationships among flexible competence, flexible capability, and customer satisfaction.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Dong Kyoon Yoo, Mark A. Vonderembse and T.S. Ragu‐Nathan

The purpose of this study is to address the nature of knowledge quality, describe its dimensions, and create valid and reliable instruments to measure it. Knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to address the nature of knowledge quality, describe its dimensions, and create valid and reliable instruments to measure it. Knowledge quality is proposed as a second‐order factor model which includes three dimensions: intrinsic knowledge quality, contextual knowledge quality, and actionable knowledge quality. This study also aims to examine important antecedents to and an outcome of knowledge quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 208 project teams were used to test measures of knowledge quality and to examine a proposed research framework by using LISREL for structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results support the claim that knowledge quality has three dimensions. The results also show that functional diversity, absorptive capacity, and knowledge networks are critical antecedents that positively impact knowledge quality, which in turn has an influence on innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The research framework enables academicians and practitioners to have important insights regarding the determinants of knowledge quality and its positive impact on innovation.

Practical implications

The valid and reliable instruments of knowledge quality provide a tool to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of intrinsic, contextual, and actionable knowledge quality. This study illustrates how firms can improve knowledge quality by integrating interdisciplinary knowledge.

Originality/values

This study identifies dimensions of knowledge quality and its antecedents and consequences.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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