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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Mark A. Evans

To investigate the potential to employ tactile form‐shaping as a prerequisite to the production of physical industrial design models by rapid prototyping.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the potential to employ tactile form‐shaping as a prerequisite to the production of physical industrial design models by rapid prototyping.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a haptic feedback device to allow the designer to “feel” 3D virtual geometry as part of the evaluation and sculpting process. To maintain a close association with professional practice, this was undertaken as part of a product design case study in which a haptic feedback/rapid prototyping strategy was compared and contrasted with the more traditional workshop‐based shaping of Styrofoam by hand.

Findings

The use of a haptic feedback device facilitated the production of rapid prototype components that had been defined through feel and sculpting, albeit prior to the build process. Despite shortcomings in the ability to replicate activities undertaken in a workshop environment, other creative opportunities emerged that could not have effectively been produced using any other methods.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst based on generic industrial design methods, the findings are drawn from only one case study.

Practical implications

A useful evaluation for those wishing to undertake further research into haptic feedback modelling or employ such a system during professional practice.

Originality/value

The study moves forward the debate into the merits and application of virtual and physical modelling techniques and provides useful case study evidence of direct comparison.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Mark A. Evans and R. Ian Campbell

This paper discusses a research programme in which the 3D computer aided industrial design geometry for a consumer product was translated into appearance models using the…

Abstract

This paper discusses a research programme in which the 3D computer aided industrial design geometry for a consumer product was translated into appearance models using the contrasting techniques of workshop‐based fabrication techniques and rapid prototyping using stereolithography. The research also examined the capacity to extend the use of the rapid prototype components for the production of a fully working prototype. The ability to combine an appearance model and a working prototype into a single “appearance prototype” was a significant advance in the application of RP within industrial design.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Carl Evans and John Gardener

The purpose of this paper is to highlight to universities the approach of professional associations in marking large volumes of assessments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight to universities the approach of professional associations in marking large volumes of assessments.

Design/methodology/approach

The issues arising in marking large undergraduate modules in universities are discussed, before describing the approach typically adopted by professional associations. The benefit for universities of adopting such an approach is then examined.

Findings

The key to marking large volumes for professional associations lies in the initial standardisation meeting, on-going discussions between markers and an ability to check and if necessary stop the marking process at several points in the marking cycle, until agreement and consistency between markers are achieved.

Research limitations/implications

This viewpoint paper is based on the experiences of the two authors in assessing professional business management associations, and not empirical research.

Practical implications

The approach described here to marking large volumes of undergraduate assessments offers a practical solution to the prevailing issues concerning consistency across teaching teams.

Originality/value

The application of the approach of professional associations to the issues surrounding marking large undergraduate modules offers a unique proposition for university staff to consider.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Michael Saker and Leighton Evans

This chapter is concerned with examining the families that play Pokémon Go together within the context of spatial practices. The chapter begins by outlining the general…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with examining the families that play Pokémon Go together within the context of spatial practices. The chapter begins by outlining the general approach to spatiality that we adopt throughout this book, which is predicated on the ‘spatial turn’ within the social sciences. Here, spatial practices are understood as being socially constructed in day-to-day live, as opposed to being something simply given. In other words, ‘the concept of the city’ and the ‘urban fact’ (de Certeau, 1984, p. 1, italics in original) are not one and the same thing. Instead, the phenomenology of space is moulded in the social realm as part of the practice of everyday life, which has consequences for hybrid reality games (HRGs) like Pokémon Go. After delineating between ‘space’ and ‘place’ à la the ‘mobilities turn’, we shift our attention to embodied approaches to urban life. This begin with an examination of the art of the flânerie, which has been reimagined to account for the ubiquity of mobile media, and more recently, locative games. A review of the literature surrounding locative games demonstrates that, for the most part, concerns about spatiality have not extended to the kind of intergenerational play that is the focus of this book. Drawing on our original study of Pokémon Go, as outlined above, then, the chapter is driven by the following research questions. First, to what extent does Pokémon Go lead to families spending more time outside and how is this reshaping experienced. Second, what effect does this HRG has on the routes and pathways families choose to follow while traversing their physical setting, as well as the sites they frequent. Third, to what extent do families engage with the various elements of Pokémon Go and what does this suggest about the evolution of locative play in the context of earlier location-based social networks (LBSNs).

Details

Intergenerational Locative Play
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-139-1

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Stephen Haswell and Elaine Evans

While the debate about fair value accounting (FVA) and the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2008-2009 has been explored in the academic and professional literature, there…

Abstract

Purpose

While the debate about fair value accounting (FVA) and the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2008-2009 has been explored in the academic and professional literature, there has been little debate about the consequences of FVA being implicated in the crash of Enron around 2001, and the effect of this on later FVA developments and the GFC. The purpose of this paper is to examine how well regulators, political actors, and other commentators may have understood the use, misuse, effects and consequences of FVA at the time of Enron, and to examine how this collective understanding (or lack thereof) has influenced later accounting policy, especially that going into and arising from the GFC.

Design/methodology/approach

Using content analysis, the commentary about FVA is traced through documents, primarily the US Congressional Hearings’ examination of the collapse of Enron that took place between December 2001 and December 2002. An assessment of the knowledge of and attitudes toward FVA is made from these and is then traced through later developments including policy responses before, during and after the GFC.

Findings

Links are found between the collapse of Enron and adjustments to FVA in the mid-2000s, which in turn became implicated in the GFC. These linkages are explored in the context of a fair value world view held by global standards setters in the mid-2000s. During the timeline from the 1990s to the mid-2000s, those advocating and adopting FVA as part of this world view, may have had collectively an insufficient understanding of the consequences or effects of FVA technology.

Originality/value

The study provides evidence of a direct link between Enron, the response of global standard setters, and the GFC controversy.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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Abstract

Details

Intergenerational Locative Play
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-139-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Mark Christensen and Sébastien Rocher

In analysing the beancounter image's trajectory, from its birth to its persistence, in European French language comics between 1945 and 2016, this paper explores why…

Abstract

Purpose

In analysing the beancounter image's trajectory, from its birth to its persistence, in European French language comics between 1945 and 2016, this paper explores why artists continue beancounter image usage in popular culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Beancounter characters have been studied in an application of Iconology (Panofsky, 1955) in order to unravel how individuals make sense of cultural artefacts and how, in turn, the visuals shape cultural belief systems at a given time.

Findings

This study reveals that comics artists usage of the beancounter image results from their critical reactions to management and capitalism whilst at other times the usage is an indication of authenticity. Motivation for the usage is not constant over time nor is the impact of the beancounter image. Both appear dependant of the level of artistic freedom experienced by the artist.

Research limitations/implications

Based on a single media (comics) with a unique characters (European French language) this study deepens exploration of the ways in which accounting becomes entwined with the everyday and implies that further research is needed.

Originality/value

Extends the work of Smith and Jacobs (2011) and Jacobs and Evans (2012) by focusing on a genre of popular culture over a long period, and by adopting a critical viewpoint. Also expands the possible applications of Panofsky's (1955) Iconology in accounting studies.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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