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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Hannamari Aula and Marjo Siltaoja

The authors explore how social approval assets, namely status and reputation, are used to legitimate and categorise a new national university. They argue that in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore how social approval assets, namely status and reputation, are used to legitimate and categorise a new national university. They argue that in the course of the legitimation process, status and reputation work as stakeholder-oriented value-creating benefits. The authors specifically analyse the discursive constructions and labels used in the process and how the process enables nationwide university reform.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ longitudinal case study utilises critical discourse analysis and analyses media and policy discourses regarding the birth of Aalto University.

Findings

The findings suggest that the legitimation of the new university was accomplished through the use of two distinct discourses: one on higher education and another on the market economy. These discourses not only sought to legitimise the new university as categorically different from existing Finnish universities, but also rationalised the merger using the expected reputation and status benefits that were claimed would accrue for supporters.

Practical implications

This study elaborates on the role of various social approval assets and labels in legitimation processes and explores how policy enforcement can take place in arenas that are not necessarily perceived as policymaking. For managers, it is crucial to understand how a chosen label (name) can result in both stakeholder support and resistance, and how important it is to anticipate the changes a label can invoke.

Originality/value

The authors propose that the use of several labels regarding a new organisation is strategically beneficial to attracting multiple audiences who may hold conflicting interests in terms of what the organisation and its offerings should embody. They propose that even though status and reputation have traditionally been defined as possessions of an organisation, they should be further understood as concepts used to disseminate and justify the interests, norms, structures and values in a stakeholder network.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

Kimmo Alajoutsijärvi, Katariina Juusola and Marjo Siltaoja

The purpose of the chapter is to elaborate the theory of academic capitalism by focusing on rarely examined forerunners of academic capitalism: namely, business schools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the chapter is to elaborate the theory of academic capitalism by focusing on rarely examined forerunners of academic capitalism: namely, business schools.

Design/methodology/approach

A research-based essay.

Findings

The findings emphasize that there are different forms of academic capitalism. Our example from Dubai context shows how more extreme form of academic capitalism, which we label Acamanic Capitalism, developed as a result of free educational markets.

Originality/value

The chapter provides scholarly value through novel conceptualization. The phenomenon of acamanic capitalism should also be acknowledged in academia and in critical management education.

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2017

Abstract

Details

Feminists and Queer Theorists Debate the Future of Critical Management Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-498-3

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Book part
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Abstract

Details

Writing Differently
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-337-6

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Kimmo Alajoutsijärvi and Kerttu Kettunen

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for identifying the primary tensions that business school dean’s encounter when moving between different…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for identifying the primary tensions that business school dean’s encounter when moving between different university contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is part of a larger research project on the development of business schools. This conceptual paper builds on the studies and personal experiences of business schools and their management in a number of different countries, primarily in Europe, North America, Asia, and the Middle East.

Findings

The present study argues that as a response to the increasing corporatization of higher education, the university sector has fragmented into at least three identifiable contexts: the traditional research university, the academic capitalist university, and the corporate university. The authors conclude that the match between a dean’s worldview and the university context ultimately determines the appropriateness, survival, and success of deanship.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical suggestions for managing business schools. Given that “good” leadership is always context dependent, no single deanship would fit for all business schools. As an outcome, both deans and the selection committees making decisions regarding their recruitment should be sensitive to their worldviews originating from the university contexts in which they previously worked.

Originality/value

Emphasizing a contextual approach to business school leadership, this paper proposes a new typology of deanship situations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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