Search results

1 – 8 of 8
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Brian Young and Marion Hetherington

Reports on a 1994 Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded review of literature on advertising and children’s food choice. Identifies and details four…

Downloads
6538

Abstract

Reports on a 1994 Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded review of literature on advertising and children’s food choice. Identifies and details four main research areas: frequency and content of television advertising to children; purchase request behaviour; influence of advertising on food‐related behaviour; and influence of advertising on attitudes and values.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Marion M. Hetherington, Ali Bell and Barbara J. Rolls

The pleasantness of a food declines with consumption and this phenomenon has been demonstrated reliably in the short‐term. To investigate long‐term effects of repeat…

Downloads
2095

Abstract

The pleasantness of a food declines with consumption and this phenomenon has been demonstrated reliably in the short‐term. To investigate long‐term effects of repeat consumption on pleasantness, preference and intake, 21 volunteers consumed either a salty snack (french fries) or sweet snack (chocolate) every day for 15 days. Four dependent variables were measured: pleasantness ratings, ranked preference, frequency of consumption and ad libitum intake. Daily pleasantness of taste ratings decreased across the exposure period only for chocolate. Ranked preference for chocolate declined during the sweet snack condition and increased during the salty snack condition. Preference for french fries remained the same during the salty snack condition and increased during the sweet snack condition. Frequency of consuming chocolate outside the laboratory decreased during the sweet snack exposure. No such pattern was found for french fries in either condition. Ad libitum intake in the laboratory remained the same over time for both foods. Short‐term sensory‐specific satiety within the eating episode was consistent over time. Therefore, long‐term monotony effects were found only for pleasantness, preference and frequency of eating chocolate following repeated exposure, but these changes had no impact on ad libitum intake. Systematic, repeat exposure to a single food provides a useful paradigm for investigating the development of monotony.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1950

E.M.R. DITMAS

AT the very outset of this paper it is necessary to make clear that it is not an attempt to compile an exhaustive bibliography of literature relating to special…

Abstract

AT the very outset of this paper it is necessary to make clear that it is not an attempt to compile an exhaustive bibliography of literature relating to special librarianship. Neither space nor time permit this. In fact, the references given can only claim to be a sample of the wealth of material on the subject and this paper is submitted in the hope that it will stimulate others to more scholarly efforts. Reference numbers throughout this paper refer to items in the ‘Select list of references to the literature of special librarianship’, section 2 onwards.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2016

Abstract

Details

Governing for the Future: Designing Democratic Institutions for a Better Tomorrow
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-056-5

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

WH Brown

The history and development of library co‐operation in Scotland is described in some detail from 1921 when the Scottish Central Library for Students was established to the…

Abstract

The history and development of library co‐operation in Scotland is described in some detail from 1921 when the Scottish Central Library for Students was established to the amalgamation of the Scottish Central Library with the National Library of Scotland in 1974. The present situation has been much complicated by the re‐organisation of local government in Scotland. Catalogues have been or are being rationalised. The National Library has also now agreed to lend items from its stock which greatly improves the back‐up service it can provide to the British Library Lending Division. As in other countries considerable advances are being made in the field of automation and the Scottish Libraries Co‐operative Automation Project (SCOLCAP) uses both UK and LC MARK tapes. Developments are also taking place in local co‐operation and non‐postal transport schemes similar to those in England and Wales.

Details

BLL Review, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6503

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

Statements by Lord Denning, M.R., vividly describing the impact of European Community Legislation are increasingly being used by lawyers and others to express their…

Abstract

Statements by Lord Denning, M.R., vividly describing the impact of European Community Legislation are increasingly being used by lawyers and others to express their concern for its effect not only on our legal system but on other sectors of our society, changes which all must accept and to which they must adapt. A popular saying of the noble Lord is “The Treaty is like an incoming tide. It flows into the estuaries and up the rivers. It cannot be held back”. The impact has more recently become impressive in food law but probably less so than in commerce or industry, with scarcely any sector left unmolested. Most of the EEC Directives have been implemented by regulations made under the appropriate sections of the Food and Drugs Act, 1955 and the 1956 Act for Scotland, but regulations proposed for Materials and Articles in Contact with Food (reviewed elsewhere in this issue) will be implemented by use of Section 2 (2) of the European Communities Act, 1972, which because it applies to the whole of the United Kingdom, will not require separate regulations for England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. This is the first time that a food regulation has been made under this statute. S.2 (2) authorises any designated Minister or Department to make regulations as well as Her Majesty Orders in Council for implementing any Community obligation, enabling any right by virtue of the Treaties (of Rome) to be excercised. The authority extends to all forms of subordinate legislation—orders, rules, regulations or other instruments and cannot fail to be of considerable importance in all fields including food law.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 80 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1938

A LETTER from the President of the Library Association (Mr. Berwick Sayers) has been received which we have pleasure in giving prominently.

Abstract

A LETTER from the President of the Library Association (Mr. Berwick Sayers) has been received which we have pleasure in giving prominently.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Melanie Pescud and Simone Pettigrew

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the practice of hiding vegetables among low socioeconomic parents.

Downloads
429

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the practice of hiding vegetables among low socioeconomic parents.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative longitudinal study involving 37 low socioeconomic Australian parents with at least one overweight or obese child aged five to nine years. Data were obtained with the use of interviews, focus groups, and self-introspections.

Findings

Identified issues relating to the practice of hiding vegetables included: how parents manage hiding vegetables, children's presence in the kitchen during vegetable preparation, the employment of deception when hiding vegetables, the use of cookbooks and blogs, and the alternative views of parents not strongly in favour of hiding vegetables.

Research limitations/implications

Hiding vegetables is a practice used by some parents to increase their children's vegetable intake. Children who are unaware of hidden vegetables in their meals are potentially missing the opportunity to develop an appreciation for vegetables and learn about vegetable preparation and cooking.

Practical implications

The findings are relevant to dietitians, general practitioners, and other health professionals providing advice to parents on appropriate child-feeding strategies.

Originality/value

This appears to be the first study to provide an in-depth account of low socioeconomic parents’ use of hiding vegetables to facilitate higher levels of vegetable consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8