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Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Miquel Reina Ortiz, Mario Santana Quintero, Clemencia Vernaza, Patricia Ramírez, Fernando Montejo Gaitán and Juana Segura Escobar

The purpose of this contribution is to demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in integrating advanced and emerging digital techniques in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this contribution is to demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in integrating advanced and emerging digital techniques in the appropriate and sustainable documentation of heritage sites in Latin America. Existing collaboration between the Universidad del Externado de Colombia, the Colombian Institute of Anthropology and History and the Carleton Immersive Media Studio of Carleton University in Ottawa (Canada) have been sued to demonstrate the importance of this approach. The described collaboration allowed a team of students, researchers, government experts and educators to document selected pilot areas of the remarkable UNESCO World Heritage Sites of National Archeological Park of Tierradentro (UNESCO, 1995) and San Agustín Archaeological Park (UNESCO, 1995). The sophisticated digital recording techniques described, such as 3D scanning, aerial and ground photogrammetry techniques, were used to capture the site's current physical condition, emphasizing the pressing need to conserve the threatened mural paintings (Tierraadentro) and carved rock phases (San Agustin). This contribution also underlines the importance of developing the training of emerging professionals from Colombia in adopting these techniques to make their documentation more accurate, reliable and sustainable in the long term. The project's conclusions demonstrate that it is crucial to integrate emerging documentation techniques into the sustainable approach to conservation of these two important UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach presented in this contribution makes technology more accessible to the conservation specialist in Latin America. It provides a comprehensive capacity building program that involves teaching about theory and practice, using two important UNESCO World Heritage Sites located in Colombia. It is also relevant to the interdisciplinary and institutional collaboration between two universities in the North/South areas of the continent and a government institution that effectively collaborates to provide training to emerging professionals.

Findings

The contribution summarizes the opportunities and limitations of adopting technology to make the documentation process for conservation more sustainable in low-income economies and provides a framework to implement future strategies in South America.

Originality/value

The paper raises a discussion on how the concept of sustainability of adopting new technologies in the context of Latin American countries can assist in optimizing the conservation of decorated surfaces in important UNESCO World Heritage Sites by involving capacity building of emerging professionals.

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Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

David Myers and Mario Santana Quintero

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Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

David Myers, Alison Dalgity and Ioannis Avramides

The purpose of this paper is to describe the Arches heritage inventory and management system for the benefit of practitioners working with heritage inventories. Arches is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the Arches heritage inventory and management system for the benefit of practitioners working with heritage inventories. Arches is a modern software platform purpose-built for the creation and management of inventories to support effective heritage place management. The system was developed as open source software jointly by the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) and World Monuments Fund (WMF).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the needs and challenges addressed by the GCI and WMF in developing Arches, explains the system’s design and functionality, reports on software releases and ongoing enhancements, describes current software implementations, and concludes by discussing the role and growth of the open source community and the Arches project’s aspirations.

Findings

The needs and challenges in the heritage field that the GCI and WMF originally identified have been confirmed through interactions between the Arches project and a range of practitioners. The suitability of Arches to address these needs is demonstrated through steady growth of the open source community and an increasing number of implementations of the Arches platform.

Practical implications

Arches provides a purpose-built system that is freely available and ready for use. It offers a system that requires a marginal investment by organizations compared to building digital inventories from scratch. The Arches project has created an international community of information technology and heritage practitioners to share experience, knowledge, and skills to address their common challenges in dealing with digital inventories.

Originality/value

The paper offers heritage practitioners details on a new tool for overcoming their challenges in building and managing digital heritage inventories.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Ona Vileikis, Giorgia Cesaro, Mario Santana Quintero, Koenraad van Balen, Anna Paolini and Azadeh Vafadari

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the application of documentation and recording techniques for World Heritage conservation using the case studies of the Petra…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the application of documentation and recording techniques for World Heritage conservation using the case studies of the Petra Archeological Park (PAP) in Jordan and the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Information System (CHRIS) in Central Asia. In the PAP case study, these techniques could aid in the assessment of risks faced by World Heritage properties and threats to the integrity of the Outstanding Universal Values (OUV). With respect to the Silk Roads CHRIS case study the Geospatial Content Management System (Geo‐CMS) proposed aims to improve information management and collaboration among all stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrated surveying techniques and information management systems together with active stakeholder participation can be used as conservation and management tools. In the case of PAP, using a systematic documentation tool (MEGA‐J) to conduct site condition and risk assessment of cultural heritage and combining photographs, maps and GPS measurements within a GIS platform allows for identifying the location and intensity of risks, and the degree of vulnerability within the PAP boundaries and buffer zone. In the Silk Roads CHRIS project the Geo‐CMS brings together data from different fields, e.g. geography, geology, history, conservation, to allow for a holistic approach towards documentation, protection and management of a number of diverse sites to be combined in serial transnational World Heritage.

Findings

The study provides insight into how digital technologies can aid in heritage documentation and conservation, including stakeholder involvement and training. Moreover, by means of the two case studies it can be shown that a combination of digital technologies allows for an efficient mapping of buffer zones and risks and how a Geo‐CMS can form a common platform to manage large quantities of information of different origin and make it accessible to stakeholders in transnational projects.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the use of digital technology and the participation of stakeholders in heritage conservation and documentation when dealing with complex World Heritage properties, e.g. serial transnational and archaeological ensembles at high risk.

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Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Khushi Shah

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the relevance of cultural heritage inventories and documentation as critical tools for heritage conservation and management in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the relevance of cultural heritage inventories and documentation as critical tools for heritage conservation and management in historic cities, through the case study of the historic city of Ahmadabad, India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the creation of inventories as part of the comprehensive documentation undertaken for preparation of the World Heritage nomination dossier. In this context, the goal of preserving the outstanding universal value of the historic city formed the basis for selection and assessment of the assets to be included in the inventory. Standard processes and methodology employed for creation of the database involved archival research and planning; field surveys for mapping, photo documentation and data collection; data registration and processing using CAD, Ms Office and geographic information system (GIS)-based digital platform. Optimal data acquisition while maintaining cost and time efficiency was an important consideration for the fieldwork.

Findings

While an inventory remains a critical conservation tool, the heritage assets are integrally linked to and influenced by their surroundings in an urban context. A comprehensive documentation approach that provides a broader understanding of the city’s natural features, built environment, heritage resources, cultural practices and socio-economic networks is therefore necessary for creation of a suitable management plan for historic cities. Traditional field surveys based on external visual observation are time and cost effective, and can generate adequate information on identification and assessment of built heritage assets for creation of inventory along with documentation of their context. However, the scale of investigation and the intended role of an inventory as an urban management tool calls for creation of integrated, accessible and updatable data management systems.

Research limitations/implications

At the moment, the database created is only used for the limited purpose of monitoring and managing the conservation of listed properties. The importance of the inventory as a critical conservation and urban management tool can be further validated once the GIS database of the historic city is integrated within the urban management and planning system for the city.

Originality/value

The inventory created for the historic city of Ahmadabad offers one of the few examples of heritage documentation at such a large scale. It covers an area of 543 ha with a detailed inventory of more than 6,000 properties. The description of, and the reflections on the process employed provide an overview of usual challenges encountered in creation, presentation and management of heritage inventories for historic cities which may offer useful guidelines to practitioners planning similar exercises and help them establish efficient work processes.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

David Myers

The purpose of this paper is to identify key elements of what makes an inventory program effective for cultural heritage conservation and management. It is hoped that it…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify key elements of what makes an inventory program effective for cultural heritage conservation and management. It is hoped that it will spur discussion among heritage professionals about increasing the effectiveness of inventory programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reflects on more than a decade of experience with the establishment of heritage surveys and inventories at national and citywide scales in the Middle East and North America, and through site-based heritage management projects. In addition, it reflects on engagement with international professionals involved with heritage inventories.

Findings

Heritage inventories are permanent, ongoing records that require long-term institutional resource commitments. To be effective for heritage management, inventory programs should be established with links to heritage legislation, built upon data standards, and maintain dedicated personnel, programs of activity, and systems on an ongoing basis. Inventories are fundamentally different than heritage surveys, or other data collection activities, which collect information within a specific timeframe.

Practical implications

The findings are based on engagement with real-world, practical applications. It is hoped that the recommendations included will be useful to professionals working in heritage institutions that are establishing inventory programs, or seeking to modernize, invigorate, or increase the effectiveness of their inventory programs.

Originality/value

This paper presents insights gained through engagement with a large number and variety of heritage inventory and survey programs and projects from across the world, reflecting on broad trends and patterns.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Philip Carlisle and Edmund Lee

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the history of heritage inventories in England and look at the requirements for a future vision of networked…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the history of heritage inventories in England and look at the requirements for a future vision of networked, digital heritage inventories to support heritage protection in England as outlined in the Heritage Information Access Strategy (HIAS). The strategy, led by Historic England, the UK Government-funded agency for heritage in England, is proposing a more formalized network where the prime sources of data relating to non-designated heritage assets will be the local authority historic environment records.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper looks at the historic development of the inventories from paper-based publications to digital data sets and the proliferation of data. The Monument Inventory Data Standard Heritage will also be discussed in the context of providing a common framework.

Findings

The present loose network presents several challenges for the multiple organizations maintaining similar data sets on disparate IT software, namely, the duplication of content, ownership of content and different approaches to recording practice and standards. There is a need for common data standards and controlled vocabularies in order to facilitate data exchange and interoperability across the network.

Practical implications

The findings are based on the common experience of heritage inventory providers in England, but are relevant to any country where multiple inventories exist. It is anticipated that the implementation of the HIAS will provide a future-proofed environment for a shared national inventory.

Originality/value

This paper presents the HIAS in its historic context. It is hoped that this may be of value to inventory programmes from outside the UK.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Peter McKeague and David Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the origins and development of national inventories in Scotland and Wales from paper-based records to digital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the origins and development of national inventories in Scotland and Wales from paper-based records to digital databases. The impact of digital technologies on data management and dissemination is considered.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploring the evolution of historic environment inventories in Scotland and Wales highlights the common issues faced and solutions adopted. In considering the longue durée, the durability and flexibility of information is highlighted.

Findings

Inventories may combine locational, descriptive and visual material to help document a fragile, finite and non-renewable resource. They provide the evidence base for decision making and stewardship in managing change, stimulating interest in and valuing the historic environment. Contribution to recognised inventories should be a requirement for activities documenting the historic environment. Digital technologies shape the expectations of a modern inventory and associated digital archives, with emphasis placed on the repurposing of inventory contents so that they can better contribute to an information network serving multiple audiences.

Social implications

Transformation from paper records to digital data has radically enhanced and democratised access to knowledge about the historic environment. Digital delivery helps place heritage data within mainstream societal activities and fosters public interest and engagement in the historic environment.

Originality/value

Inventories are the foundation building blocks of informed decision making. Digital technologies have transformed these resources to help place the historic environment within mainstream societal activities and interest.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Yasuhisa Kondo, Takehiro Miki, Taichi Kuronuma, Yuichi S. Hayakawa, Kyoko Kataoka and Takashi Oguchi

The purpose of this paper is to present a concurrent implementation of sustainable inventory for the UNESCO World Heritage sites of Bat, Al-Khutm and Al-Ayn in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a concurrent implementation of sustainable inventory for the UNESCO World Heritage sites of Bat, Al-Khutm and Al-Ayn in the interior of Oman.

Design/methodology/approach

A digital heritage inventory (DHI) was developed through an action research to realize demands of the local agent and to co-design the solution. The Ministry of Heritage and Culture of Oman, the local agent, demanded to have archaeological information of the sites shared with foreign expeditions, which had worked at the sites for decades, for efficient heritage management, scientific research, outreach, and education. To this end, the Bat Digital Heritage Inventory (BatDHI) was implemented by a combination of network-access-ready database application, open source geographical information systems, and a web-based map service to incorporate and visualize previous works, which were concurrently cross-checked and updated by ground-truth surveys.

Findings

The online inventory made it possible to update information during archaeological fieldwork in real time and accelerated the decision-making process in heritage management by prompt data updates and visualization.

Research limitations/implications

The DHI is extendable for other sites or regions. It should also be considered to install Arches, an open-source suite of digital heritage inventories.

Practical implications

The BatDHI was implemented through the action research mentioned in the design/methodology/approach section and yielded the implications mentioned in the findings section.

Originality/value

This paper is a challenging application of transdisciplinary approach to the sustainable heritage management, in which researchers and societal stakeholders collaborate for co-design of research agendas, co-production of knowledge, and co-dissemination of outcomes.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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