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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Marina Micheli, Christoph Lutz and Moritz Büchi

This conceptual contribution is based on the observation that digital inequalities literature has not sufficiently considered digital footprints as an important social…

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Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual contribution is based on the observation that digital inequalities literature has not sufficiently considered digital footprints as an important social differentiator. The purpose of the paper is to inspire current digital inequality frameworks to include this new dimension.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature on digital inequalities is combined with research on privacy, big data and algorithms. The focus on current findings from an interdisciplinary point of view allows for a synthesis of different perspectives and conceptual development of digital footprints as a new dimension of digital inequality.

Findings

Digital footprints originate from active content creation, passive participation and platform-generated data. The literature review shows how different social groups may experience systematic advantages or disadvantages based on their digital footprints. A special emphasis should be on those at the margins, for example, users of low socioeconomic background.

Originality/value

By combining largely independent research fields, the contribution opens new avenues for studying digital inequalities, including innovative methodologies to do so.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2015

Marina Micheli

In recent times the relationship between social stratification and internet use has become more complex. In order to understand the new configuration of the digital…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent times the relationship between social stratification and internet use has become more complex. In order to understand the new configuration of the digital divide, this paper examines the relationship between socioeconomic background and digital engagement among youths.

Methodology/approach

This study explores digital inequalities among Italian teenagers from a holistic perspective. It draws on primary data obtained with a triangulation of methods: a survey on a representative sample of 2,025 high school students and 56 semi-structured interviews with teenagers from different social classes.

Findings

The statistical models indicate that cultural capital and parents’ occupational status do not associate with broader social media use but are positively related with online information-seeking. The interpretative analysis suggests that teenagers from the upper-middle class make sense of the internet “vertically,” in affiliation with parental socialization, and are more concerned with capital enhancing activities. Instead, teenagers from less advantageous social contexts appropriate the internet “horizontally,” jointly with peers, and are mostly interested in social-networking and UGC production.

Practical implications

School track, along with parents’ socioeconomic status and cultural capital, influences teenagers’ internet use. Further studies could explore whether school tracking contributes to digital inequalities.

Originality/value

The study extends Annette Lareau’s theory of parenting styles and social reproduction, but also obtains innovative results related to digital inequalities among youth. Contrary to expectations, teenagers from less advantageous social backgrounds enrolled in vocational schools have better chances to actively participate in social media than teens from the upper-middle class in academic-oriented high schools.

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-381-5

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2015

Abstract

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-381-5

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2015

Abstract

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-381-5

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Jenifer Sunrise Winter

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255

Abstract

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2015

Abstract

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-381-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Abdallah Amhalhal, John Anchor, Marina Papalexi and Shabbir Dastgir

This study is an empirical investigation of the relationship between the use of 41 multiple performance measures (MPMs), including financial performance measures (FPM)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is an empirical investigation of the relationship between the use of 41 multiple performance measures (MPMs), including financial performance measures (FPM), non-financial performance measures (NFPMs) and organisational performance (OP) in Libya.

Design/methodology/approach

The results are based on cross-sectional questionnaire survey data from 132 Libyan companies (response rate 61%), which were obtained just before the so-called Arab Spring.

Findings

MPMs are used by both manufacturing and non-manufacturing companies. Libyan business organisations are more likely to use FPMs than NFPMs. However, these companies still rely more heavily on FPMs. The relationships between the use of NFPMs and OP and the use of MPMs and OP are positive and highly significant. The relationship between the use of FPMs and OP is positive but not significant.

Research limitations/implications

The high power distance associated with the conservative, Libyan, Arab context will reinforce the tendency to use FPMs more than NFPMs. This may provide a performance advantage to those organisations which do adopt NFPMs.

Practical implications

Although there may be institutional barriers to the use of NFPMs in Libya, and other emerging markets, these are not insuperable and there is a payoff to their use.

Originality/value

No previous studies of emerging markets, such as the Middle East or North Africa, have looked at the relationship between OP and the adoption of such a large array of MPMs.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2007

Gerben Bakker

At the end of the nineteenth century, in the era of the second industrial revolution, falling working hours, rising disposable income, increasing urbanisation, rapidly…

Abstract

At the end of the nineteenth century, in the era of the second industrial revolution, falling working hours, rising disposable income, increasing urbanisation, rapidly expanding transport networks and strong population growth resulted in a sharp rise in the demand for entertainment. Initially, the expenditure was spread across different categories, such as live entertainment, sports, music, bowling alleys or skating rinks. One of these categories was cinematographic entertainment, a new service, based on a new technology. Initially it seemed not more than a fad, a novelty shown at fairs, but it quickly emerged as the dominant form of popular entertainment. This paper argues that the take-off of cinema was largely demand-driven, and that, in an evolutionary process, consumers allocated more and more expenditure to cinema. It will analyse how consumer habits and practices evolved with the new cinema technology and led to the formation of a new product/service.

Details

The Evolution of Consumption: Theories and Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1452-2

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Marina Dantas de Figueiredo, Neyliane Maranhão de Castro and Minelle E. Silva

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how changes toward sustainable consumption of electric energy [1] are learned in the workplace, the paper uses a practice-based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how changes toward sustainable consumption of electric energy [1] are learned in the workplace, the paper uses a practice-based approach to organizational learning. This paper focuses on the workplace as a rich environment where social learning is not limited to individuals but is also rooted in the community of practitioners at an organizational level.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used participative action research through interviews, two focus groups and observations. Departing from the interventions, this paper identified the elements of the practice of energy consumption. This paper further altered elements to intentionally promote the reconfiguration of such practice toward sustainable patterns among the working group.

Findings

The results show that the goal of promoting sustainability through changes in the individual and collective actions and understandings may be achieved through sharing knowledge and keeping knowledge alive within the practices of a community; embedding knowledge in material practices and innovating as an ongoing process. During the research, this paper observed that employees became more aware of sustainable consumption and such self-consciousness prompted behavioral changes in the workplace. Likewise, the new material arrangements adopted in the work environment nudged sustainable energy consumption, which required lower levels of awareness.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to sustainability studies by providing more information on how the learning of sustainable energy consumption happens in the level of social practices. It also contributes to workplace studies by showing that changes in materials, meanings and competences interwove with new dynamics to reshape the practice, foreshadowing more lasting changes toward sustainability.

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2020

J. E. Yalico, M. B. Ortíz, J. A. Larco, A. Gallegos and C. Antonini

The key performance indicators (KPIs) are frequently used in organizations, and they help to transmit the strategy at all levels of the organization. However, the…

Abstract

The key performance indicators (KPIs) are frequently used in organizations, and they help to transmit the strategy at all levels of the organization. However, the implementation of these indicators in small- and medium-sized companies remains a challenge. Many studies reveal two challenges faced by these firms, the lack of knowledge about the KPIs and the lack of alignment of these with the business strategy. For this reason, this chapter investigated the current level of knowledge about KPIs in managers of small and medium enterprises in the wood and timber sector in Peru.

The level of knowledge was measured using the framework of Bloom's Taxonomy in 21 firms. The use and importance that managers assign to performance indicators were evaluated, in order to identify gaps that exist between the strategy and its use.

The results of a survey study show a high degree of variability in the knowledge of KPI-related concepts as well as an average low level of usage. The importance attributed to KPIs was seen as a necessary but not sufficient condition for attaining higher levels of KPI usage.

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