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Robert Collins, Matt Hector‐Taylor and Marilyn Wedgwood

The EHE programme at Sheffield University focuses primarily on theprocess of curriculum change so as to become embedded within theinstitution. In the first year of the…

Abstract

The EHE programme at Sheffield University focuses primarily on the process of curriculum change so as to become embedded within the institution. In the first year of the programme, these changes to curricula are generally experimental, testing new techniques and searching for ways actively to involve students. Departments define “enterprise” in the context of their particular subject. This has resulted in a diverse range of curriculum development projects operating in a large number of departments. Each project aims to address one or more of the four main objectives of the EHE programme at Sheffield: personal skill development, collaborative work with employers, IT skill development and monitoring of student achievement through a personal profile. A key feature of the Sheffield programme is the aim of actively involving students in all aspects of curriculum change. A Student Development Manager is employed to secure student participation in EHE developments. A tripartite partnership is in operation, between staff, employers and students at Sheffield, to support and stimulate the development of EHE.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

Bradley Bowden and Peta Stevenson-Clarke

Postmodernist ideas – most particularly those of Foucault but also those of Latour, Derrida and Barthes – have had a much longer presence in accounting research than in…

Abstract

Purpose

Postmodernist ideas – most particularly those of Foucault but also those of Latour, Derrida and Barthes – have had a much longer presence in accounting research than in other business disciplines. However, in large part, the debates in accounting history and management history, have moved in parallel but separate universes. The purpose of this study is therefore one of exploring not only critical accounting understandings that are significant for management history but also one of highlighting conceptual flaws that are common to the postmodernist literature in both accounting and management history.

Design/methodology/approach

Foucault has been seminal to the critical traditions that have emerged in both accounting research and management history. In exploring the usage of Foucault’s ideas, this paper argues that an over-reliance on a set of Foucauldian concepts – governmentality, “disciplinary society,” neo-liberalism – that were never conceived with an eye to the problems of accounting and management has resulted in not only in the drawing of some very longbows from Foucault’s formulations but also misrepresentations of the French philosophers’ ideas.

Findings

Many, if not most, of the intellectual positions associated with the “Historic Turn” and ANTi-History – that knowledge is inherently subjective, that management involves exercising power at distance, that history is a social construct that is used to legitimate capitalism and management – were argued in the critical accounting literature long before Clark and Rowlinson’s (2004) oft cited call. Indeed, the “call” for a “New Accounting History” issued by Miller et al. (1991) played a remarkably similar role to that made by Clark and Rowlinson in management and organizational studies more than a decade later.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the marked similarities between the critical accounting literature, most particularly that related to the “New Accounting History” and that associated with the “Historic Turn” and ANTi-History in management and organizational studies.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article

Paula A. Baxter

Acknowledges that research on objects belonging to the categories of furniture, glass and stained glass, metalware, pottery and porcelain, or rugs and carpets involves the…

Abstract

Acknowledges that research on objects belonging to the categories of furniture, glass and stained glass, metalware, pottery and porcelain, or rugs and carpets involves the consultation of specific handbooks and guides. Lists, with a brief description, various decorative‐art reference books as sources for research in these categories, and offers relevant subject headings so that the New York Public Library’s catalogs can be checked for similar holdings.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

Stephen Brown

The past may be a foreign country, according to L.P. Hartley, but marketers seem to have secured resident alien status. Retro products, services, advertisements and…

Abstract

The past may be a foreign country, according to L.P. Hartley, but marketers seem to have secured resident alien status. Retro products, services, advertisements and pricing policies are everywhere apparent, as are heritage centres, mega‐brand museums, festival shopping malls and retrorestaurants like Planet Hollywood, Hard Rock Café or Dick Clarke’s American Bandstand Grill. This paper examines the retro‐marketing phenomenon, notes its characteristics, causes and consequences, and makes some sure‐to‐prove‐erroneous predictions about the future of the past.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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