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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Deniz Gevrek, Marilyn Spencer, David Hudgins and Valrie Chambers

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of salary raises and employees’ perception of these salary raises on their intended retention and turnover. By using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of salary raises and employees’ perception of these salary raises on their intended retention and turnover. By using a survey data set from a representative American public university, this study investigates a novel hypothesis that faculty perceptions of salary raises, relative to their perceptions of other faculty members’ assessments of the raises, influence their intended labor supply.

Design/methodology/approach

Using both ordered probit and OLS modeling frameworks, the authors focus on the impact of salary raises and the relative perception of these raises on intended labor supply behavior. They explore a hypothesis that a mismatch between one’s ranking of the salary raise and the perception of others’ rankings causes dissatisfaction.

Findings

The results provide evidence that salary raises themselves are effective monetary tools to reduce intended turnover; however, the results also suggest that relative deprivation as a comparison of one’s own perceptions of a salary raise with others affects employee intended retention. The authors find that employees who have less favorable perceptions of salary adjustments, compared to what they believe their colleagues think, are more likely to consider another employer, holding their own perception of raises constant. Conversely, more favorable views of salary raises, compared to how faculty members think other’s perceived the salary raises, does not have a statistically significant impact on intended retention.

Originality/value

This is the first study that explores an employee’s satisfaction with salary raises relative to perceptions of other employees’ satisfaction with their own salary raises, and the resulting intended labor supply in an American university. The results indicate that monetary rewards in the form of salary raises do impact faculty intended retention; however, perception of fairness of these salary raises is more important than the actual raises. Given the high cost of job turnover, these findings suggest that employers may benefit from devoting resources toward ensuring that salary- and raise-determining procedures are generally perceived by the vast majority of employees as being fair.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Marilyn Spencer, Deniz Gevrek, Valrie Chambers and Randall Bowden

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a particular low marginal-cost employee benefit on employees’ intended retention and performance. By utilizing a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a particular low marginal-cost employee benefit on employees’ intended retention and performance. By utilizing a unique data set constructed by surveying full-time faculty and staff members at a public university in the USA, the authors study the impact of this employee benefit on faculty and staff performance and retention.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors focus on the impact of reduction in dependent college tuition at various levels on employees’ intentions to work harder and stay at their current job by using both OLS and ordered probit models. The authors also simulate the direct opportunity cost (reduction in revenue) in dollars and as a percent of total budgeted revenue to facilitate administrative decision making.

Findings

The results provide evidence that for institutions where employee retention and productivity are a priority, maximizing or offering dependent college tuition waiver may be a relatively low-cost benefit to increase retention and productivity. In addition, the amount of the tuition waiver, number of dependents and annual salary are statistically significant predictors of intended increased productivity and intent to stay employed at the current institution.

Originality/value

Employee retention and productivity is a challenge for all organizations. Although pay, benefits and organizational culture tend to be key indicators of job satisfaction, little attention is given to specific types of benefits. This study is the first comprehensive attempt to explore the relationship between the impact of this low-cost employee benefit and employee performance and retention in a higher education institution in the USA.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Marilyn A. Stone and A.H. Clarkson

Aspects of research conducted among financial institutions,specifically building societies, banks, charge card operators andinsurance groups are discussed. Within the…

Abstract

Aspects of research conducted among financial institutions, specifically building societies, banks, charge card operators and insurance groups are discussed. Within the context of trends in, and growing deregulation of, the financial sector, the role is examined of the marketing information systems to enable institutions to differentiate their marketing strategies and services. In particular, the ability to process information to develop precise targeting of customers with the appropriate value added services is considered. The MIS is increasingly crucial to strategic development within, and between, financial sectors. It is contended that size and use of technology are critical to leadership in the personal finance market.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 7 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Naomi F. Campbell, Melissa S. Reeves, Marilyn Tourné and M. Francis Bridges

Process-oriented guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) is a student-centered instructional strategy to actively engage students in the classroom in promoting content mastery…

Abstract

Process-oriented guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) is a student-centered instructional strategy to actively engage students in the classroom in promoting content mastery, critical thinking, and process skills. The students organize into groups of three to four, and each group member works collaboratively to construct their understanding as they proceed through the embedded learning cycle in the POGIL activity. Each group member has a specific role and actively engages in the learning process. The roles rotate periodically, and each student has the opportunity to develop essential process skills, such as leadership skills, oral and written communication skills, team-building skills, and information-processing skills. The student groups are self-managed, and the instructor serves as a facilitator of student learning. A POGIL activity typically contains a model that the students deconstruct using a series of guided, exploratory questions. The students develop concepts (concept invention) as the group members reach a valid, consensus conclusion. The students apply their concepts to new problems completing the learning cycle. The authors implemented POGIL instruction in several chemistry courses at Jackson State University and Tuskegee University. They share their initial findings, experiences, and insights gained using a new instructional strategy.

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2011

Julia Clark and Marilyn McGee‐Lennon

An increase in the ageing UK population is leading to new ways of looking at how we deliver health and social care services in the UK. The use of assisted living…

Abstract

An increase in the ageing UK population is leading to new ways of looking at how we deliver health and social care services in the UK. The use of assisted living technology (ALT) and telecare is already playing a part in these new models of care. Yet despite the current advances in the range of technology and networking capabilities in the home, ALT and telecare solutions have not been taken up as eagerly as might have been anticipated. The study reported here used scenario‐based focus groups with a wide variety of stakeholders in home care to identify the existing barriers to the successful uptake of ALTs and telecare in Scotland. Six focus group sessions were conducted with individual stakeholder groups (social care workers, policy makers, telecare installation technicians, older users, informal carers) and five conducted with mixed stakeholder groups. The focus groups used the same home care scenario to identify and categorise the different perceptions, attitudes, and expectations of the various stakeholders when discussing telecare implementation for a fictitious older couple. The emerging themes from the focus groups were analysed and categorised according to the Framework Analysis approach. We present a synthesised list of the current barriers to the uptake of ALTs and telecare ‐ and discuss how each of these barriers might be overcome. If these barriers are addressed, we believe telehealthcare technologies will be better designed, more usable, easier to prescribe effectively, more acceptable to more users in more contexts, and ultimately more common place in homes throughout the UK.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2002

Abstract

Details

African American Education: Race, Community, Inequality, and Achievement a Tribute to Edgar G. Epps
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-829-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

Ann Marucheck and Marilyn McClelland

One strategic design parameter in capacity management is thesetting of a planned level of capacity utilization at which themanufacturing operation will operate long term…

Abstract

One strategic design parameter in capacity management is the setting of a planned level of capacity utilization at which the manufacturing operation will operate long term. Seeks to examine systematically the implications of varying levels of capacity utilization within an assemble‐to‐order firm through experiments with a simulation model. Four performance measures and a total weekly cost measure are analysed under nine capacity utilization levels, two demand patterns, and 11 ratios of the costs of idle capacity to the costs of late orders. The prescribed capacity utilization level is a function of the firm′s competitive goals, demand pattern, and cost structures.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Peggy Newton

Since the 1970s there has been a variety of initiatives encouraging women to become engineers, and the proportion of women entering degree level courses in engineering is…

Abstract

Since the 1970s there has been a variety of initiatives encouraging women to become engineers, and the proportion of women entering degree level courses in engineering is rising rapidly. In 1985 nearly 11% of engineering students on degree courses at universities were women. This trend parallels similar, although more dramatic, increases in the proportion of women engineers in the United States and France. However, these statistics must be set against the fact that women remain far more unusual as practising engineers; they represent 2.9% of technicians, 3.9% of professional engineers and approximately 1% of chartered engineers.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Marilyn A. Stone

Examines the involvement of UK logistics, service providers (LSPs) within Continental Europe markets and considers the strategies they have used for European operations…

Abstract

Examines the involvement of UK logistics, service providers (LSPs) within Continental Europe markets and considers the strategies they have used for European operations together with their favoured expansion routes which have been following piggyback opportunities, acquiring local firms, joint venture arrangements and encouraging organic growth. Considers eight case studies of leading UK‐based LSPs involved in Continental Europe. Their European expansion strategies are examined in terms of their performance, their organisational development structures (multidomestic, Eurolinkers or pan‐European), their organisation of finance, marketing and information technology control as well as the influence of management culture. Finds that expansion in Europe has proved demanding for UK LSPs and that, despite the early optimism, the Single European Market has yet to fulfil its initial promise. Major UK LSPs are obliged to operate across European borders to service multinational customers but this continues to pose challenges.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Matthew W. Ragas and Ron Culp

Abstract

Details

Business Acumen for Strategic Communicators: A Primer
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-662-9

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