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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Chinedu Obi, Fabio Bartolini and Marijke D’Haese

This paper aims to explore the connectivity between social media use, access to migrant networks, information asymmetry and migration intentions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the connectivity between social media use, access to migrant networks, information asymmetry and migration intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted using data from individuals living in Nigeria and analysed with a generalized structural equation model, which is rare for this kind of research.

Findings

The authors find a dual mediating role of the social media and the migrant networks in facilitating migration, i.e. reducing the threshold cost required to migrate and introducing a bias in terms of information asymmetry. While social media and access to migrant networks directly increase migration intentions, this changes when incomplete information is provided. People who use social media and their migrant networks for information are more likely to have information about destination countries than information on the transit risk.

Social implications

The study adds valuable insights for designing awareness campaigns aimed at reducing irregular migration.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of the intersection of migration and digitalization

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Wytse Vellema and Marijke D'Haese

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the extent to which transaction cost theory on hybrid governance structures can explain hybrid personalities observed in the South…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the extent to which transaction cost theory on hybrid governance structures can explain hybrid personalities observed in the South African sugar industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Three governance structures used simultaneously by the same company to purchase sugar cane from small-scale growers are described in detail. One of these structures is close to a market arrangement, the other two are hybrids. The discriminating alignment hypothesis and more recent work on hybrid models are used to explain the factors driving the choice for a hybrid arrangement and determining their specific form. Factors not covered by theory are identified.

Findings

At least two areas would need to be included to explain the specific form taken by the studied governance structures: production characteristics and financial constraints of the transacting parties. Furthermore, the importance of national and local regulations in affecting organizational form by determining what is and is not possible is demonstrated.

Research limitations/implications

This case study highlights limitations of current theory in fully explaining the “personality” of governance structures. Future work should not shun the finer details of governance structures and their interaction with the institutional environment.

Social implications

Inclusive business models are promoted as tools for poverty alleviation and economic development. Public involvement plays an important role, however, more research is required to understand its reach and leverage its full potential.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to rigorously apply transaction cost theory to inclusive business models in agricultural sourcing, an area which is rapidly gaining prominence on the development agenda. It shows that a complete understanding requires going beyond current theory.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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