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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2019

Delphine Godefroit-Winkel, Marie Schill and Margaret K. Hogg

This paper aims to examine the interplay of emotions and consumption within intergenerational exchanges. It shows how emotions pervade the trajectories of grandmothers 

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the interplay of emotions and consumption within intergenerational exchanges. It shows how emotions pervade the trajectories of grandmothers’ relational identities with their grandchildren through consumption practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyses qualitative data gathered via 28 long interviews with French grandmothers and 27 semi-structured interviews with their grandchildren. This study draws on attachment theory to interpret the voices of both grandmothers and their grandchildren within these dyads.

Findings

This study uncovers distinct relational identities of grandmothers linked to emotions and the age of the grandchild, as embedded in consumption. It identifies the defining characteristics of the trajectory of social/relational identities and finds these to be linked to grandchildren’s ages.

Research limitations/implications

This study elicits the emotion profiles, which influence grandmothers’ patterns of consumption in their relationships with their grandchildren. It further uncovers distinct attachment styles (embedded in emotions) between grandmothers and grandchildren in the context of their consumption experiences. Finally, it provides evidence that emotions occur at the interpersonal level. This observation is an addition to existing literature in consumer research, which has often conceived of consumer emotions as being only a private matter and as an intrapersonal phenomenon.

Practical implications

The findings offer avenues for the development of strategies for intergenerational marketing, particularly promotion campaigns which link either the reinforcement or the suppression of emotion profiles in advertising messages with the consumption of products or services by different generations.

Social implications

This study suggests that public institutions might multiply opportunities for family and consumer experiences to combat specific societal issues related to elderly people’s isolation.

Originality/value

In contrast to earlier work, which has examined emotions within the ebb and flow of individual and multiple social identities, this study examines how emotions and consumption play out in social/relational identity trajectories.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Marie Schill and Delphine Godefroit-Winkel

The purpose of this study is to explore consumers’ profiles for and purchase intentions towards smart environmental objects. It segments consumers according to two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore consumers’ profiles for and purchase intentions towards smart environmental objects. It segments consumers according to two apparently contradictory dimensions of smart environmental objects: environment (i.e. environmental concern and environmental beliefs) and technology (i.e. materialistic values and technological beliefs).

Design/methodology/approach

A cluster analysis was conducted among 658 French consumers based on their environmental concern, environmental beliefs, materialistic values, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. A regression analysis identifies the variables with the greatest influence on purchase intentions.

Findings

Four segments result from the analysis: unconcerned, retro eco-friendly, non-materialistic converted and converted. The converted consumer segment had the highest purchase intentions and exhibited high levels of both environmental beliefs and perceived usefulness compared with the other segments. Both environmental and technological beliefs and environmental concern influence purchase intentions more broadly.

Research limitations/implications

A combined consideration of both environmental and technological beliefs is necessary to influence purchase intentions towards smart environmental objects. This study challenges some previous research that assumes a clear opposition between materialism and environmentalism.

Practical implications

This study proposes tailored managerial recommendations for each of the four consumer segments in the context of smart environmental objects.

Originality/value

This study provides novel insights into consumers’ concerns, beliefs and values in the rapidly expanding context of smart environmental objects.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Marie Schill and Delphine Godefroit-Winkel

Drawing on the stimulus–organism–response (S-O-R) framework, this study presents an original model examining the influence of environmental corporate social responsibility…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the stimulus–organism–response (S-O-R) framework, this study presents an original model examining the influence of environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR), luxury and service quality dimensions on consumer emotions that in turn influence consumer attitudes towards the shopping mall.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling is applied to data from a sample of 706 French consumers to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results highlight the importance of environmental CSR, luxury and service quality dimensions as stimuli influencing positively consumer emotions, which in turn positively influence consumer attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends prior work in the field of services marketing and the S-O-R framework while considering environmental CSR, luxury and service quality dimensions as relevant stimuli. It further contributes to the literature of the shopping mall while examining relevant and unexplored antecedents to consumer emotions.

Practical implications

This paper provides tailored recommendations for shopping mall managers. It details how managers can use environmental CSR and luxury dimensions besides service quality as relevant stimuli in their positioning strategies to enhance consumer emotions and attitudes.

Originality/value

This study provides novel insights into shopping mall dimensions, i.e. environmental CSR, luxury and service quality, influencing consumer responses.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Delphine Godefroit-Winkel, Marie Schill and Fatou Diop-Sall

This study identifies the impact of supermarket environmental corporate social responsibility (ECSR) on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study identifies the impact of supermarket environmental corporate social responsibility (ECSR) on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Based on the stimulus-organism-response (S-O-R), this study demonstrates how positive and negative emotions mediate the relationships between consumers’ perceptions of ECSR and consumers’ attitudes towards their supermarket. This study draws from cultural theory and works on sustainability and examines the moderating effect of the cultural context on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A supermarket intercept survey was conducted among 327 consumers in France and 444 consumers in Morocco. The proposed model was analysed using Amos 22.

Findings

ECSR’s impact on consumer loyalty varies across cultural contexts through the mediation of positive and negative emotions. The study also indicates how consumers’ levels of environmentalism moderate the direct effect of supermarket ECSR on consumers’ attitudes towards the supermarket.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the S-O-R and cultural theories, this study demonstrates how the dimensions of the cultural context moderate the direct and indirect effects of ECSR on consumers’ loyalty towards their supermarket. Specifically, favourable perceptions of supermarket ECSR have an ambivalent impact on consumers’ attitudes through the mediation of negative emotions, such as shame, in more collectivist, low uncertainty avoidance and short-term oriented countries.

Practical implications

Tailored recommendations for supermarket managers interested in ECSR and operating in an international context are provided.

Social implications

This research highlights the varying impacts of environmental actions in international retailing.

Originality/value

Using the S-O-R and cultural theories, this study reveals nuances to existing knowledge on the role of consumers’ emotions in international retailing. It reveals the salience of negative emotions after the perception of a positively valenced stimulus across distinct cultural contexts.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Catherine Marie Clark and Christian Harrison

The purpose of this paper is to advance contemporary cognisance of the leadership field and its current state, through the synthesis and development of earlier…

1791

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance contemporary cognisance of the leadership field and its current state, through the synthesis and development of earlier contributions. A taxonomy of evolutionary eras is tendered, from which future research opportunities can be extrapolated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts a narrative literature review of significant leadership literature. There is a focus on prominent contributions which are considered to have been highly influential within the field, while acknowledging other notable influences.

Findings

Leadership is found to be a multifaceted and evolving field, which continues to produce further research fields. This dynamism hinders the progression of leadership to achieve integration. Eleven interrelated eras of leadership, which hold varying research value, were found. While some eras superficially appear to be discredited, there is arguably scope for these to be developed in contemporary context. Currently, the leadership approaches which are replete with research opportunities include servant leadership, a skills approach and an entrepreneurial leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Leadership is a vast research area with numerous contributions to its body of work; therefore, this review has focused on prominent contributions and has not attempted to include all available literature. The dissemination of leadership literature has allowed for research gaps to emerge and future research recommendations to be drawn.

Originality/value

While there is an extensive body of leadership literature, there are few reviews of the literature. A comprehensive contemporary review facilitates an examination of the current complexities and state of the leadership field.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 April 2019

Shelley Kinash and Madelaine-Marie Judd

Students are drawn to doctorates for both the intellectual journey and the aspirational destination. However, many contemporary doctoral students and graduates are feeling…

Abstract

Students are drawn to doctorates for both the intellectual journey and the aspirational destination. However, many contemporary doctoral students and graduates are feeling like battlers, in that victory does not assure a career. In this context, the weapons of choice are a clear vision, identity, and strategic choices. The aim of this chapter is to inform students, their supervisors, and university executive leaders how to achieve heightened graduate employability. As such, it has been written for four audiences: (1) PhD students, who want academic careers, and (2) those who want careers beyond universities; (3) PhD supervisors; and (4) university executive leaders. The key takeaways are practical recommendations for each of these four groups. The content is informed by an Australian national research study into postgraduate student experience, which included 319 postgraduate students as research participants. The first chapter author was one of two principal researchers leading the study, and the second chapter author was the project manager and researcher. The authors have added their reflections and personal experiences as supervisor and PhD student respectively.

Details

Getting the Most Out of Your Doctorate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-905-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Karen Corteen

To discuss the regulation of professional wrestling in the USA in order to explore how the business of professional wrestling is regulated and deregulated.

Abstract

Purpose

To discuss the regulation of professional wrestling in the USA in order to explore how the business of professional wrestling is regulated and deregulated.

Approach

Using desk-based research, the regulation and deregulation of professional wrestling will be explored.

Findings

The regulation of professional wrestling in the USA is inconsistent. The extent of regulation and deregulation of professional wrestling is dependent on the state in which the event takes place. Whether regulated or deregulated, professional wrestling is a painful, risky and injurious business wherein the economic health and well-being of the World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) corporation, and the location in which events take place, take precedence over the health and well-being of working sports participants.

Implications

The research is limited to sports participants working in the dominant, visible and therefore arguably most accountable professional wrestling corporation in the USA. Implication of the research is that a more in-depth investigation into the utility of regulation is needed. Additionally, it raises concerns regarding the potential hidden work-related premature deaths, harms and injuries in other promotions in the USA and beyond.

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Marie‐Claude Beaulieu, Marie‐Hélène Gagnon and Lynda Khalaf

The purpose of this paper is to examine financial integration across North American stock markets from January 1984 to December 2003.

1319

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine financial integration across North American stock markets from January 1984 to December 2003.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an arbitrage pricing theory framework. The risk factors considered are the three Fama and French factors augmented with momentum for both countries as well as their international counterparts. Both the domestic and international four factor models in cross section and test for partial, mild, and strong financial integration are estimated. The domestic and international model are estimated on domestic portfolios and on a subset of Canadian cross listings matched with American stocks.

Findings

Results can be summarized as follows: first, results show stronger evidence of mild rather than partial or strong integration in both domestic portfolios and interlisted stocks. Second, interlisted stocks appear at first glance to be more integrated than the domestic portfolios, but this result can be attributed to the poor explanatory power of the models applied to interlisted stocks. Once the authors rule out the case where the model does not generate statistically important risk premiums for both countries, the evidence of integration is similar in both domestic and interlisted stocks. Third, the domestic and international models have similar explanatory power, although the domestic model performs better with the Canadian interlisted stocks are found.

Originality/value

The results suggest that, in an international context, a portfolio manager is better off using the four factor model as a benchmark in cross sections rather than the single market. Furthermore, if the agency problem described in Karolyi is ignored, Canadian interlisted stocks and Canadian domestic portfolios have the same diversification potential.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Chris Brewster, Vesa Suutari and Marie-France Waxin

This paper aims: to undertake a systematic literature review on SIEs, examining twenty years of literature published between 2000 and 2020, focusing on the most-cited…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims: to undertake a systematic literature review on SIEs, examining twenty years of literature published between 2000 and 2020, focusing on the most-cited empirical work in the field; to analyse the topics covered by these studies; and to propose a research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a systematic literature review, identifying the 20 most-cited empirical articles through citation analysis during the period and, because citations accrue over time, the six most-cited empirical articles of the last three years. We then used content analysis to examine the main themes they address and identify the research gaps.

Findings

The most common themes addressed in the SIE literature are: analysis of the types and distinctions of SIEs, motivation to undertake self-initiated expatriation, SIEs' adjustment to the new country, and SIEs' careers and outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper provides a first opportunity to look back at 20 years of research into a relatively new topic, highlighting the main research themes and knowledge gaps, and setting directions for future research. The paper expands knowledge on SIEs, assisting SIE scholars and IHRM practitioners to develop a global, critical understanding of SIEs' issues, and hopefully energising future research in this field.

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Angelina Zubac, Marie Dasborough, Kate Hughes, Zhou Jiang, Shelley Kirkpatrick, Maris G. Martinsons, Danielle Tucker and Ofer Zwikael

The aim of this special issue is to better understand the strategy and change interface, in particular, the (sub)processes and cognitions that enable strategies to be…

Abstract

The aim of this special issue is to better understand the strategy and change interface, in particular, the (sub)processes and cognitions that enable strategies to be successfully implemented and organizations effectively changed. The ten papers selected for this special issue reflect a range of scholarly traditions and, thus, as our review and integration of the relevant literatures, and our introductions to the ten papers demonstrate, they shed light on the strategy and change interface in starkly different ways. Collectively, the papers give us more insight into the recursive activities, and structural, organizational learning and cognitive mechanisms that are encouraged or deliberately established at organizations to allow their people to successfully implement a strategy and effect change, including achieve greater levels of horizontal alignment. Moreover, they demonstrate the benefits associated with establishing platforms and/or routines designed to overcome decision-makers’ cognitive shortcomings while implementing a strategy or making timely adjustments to it. We conclude our editorial by identifying some yet unanswered questions.

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