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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Marie Boltz, Elizabeth Capezuti and Nina Shabbat

The purpose of this mixed methods study is to define the core components of a system‐wide, acute care program designed to meet the needs of older adults.

1306

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this mixed methods study is to define the core components of a system‐wide, acute care program designed to meet the needs of older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

Concept mapping methodology (multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis) was used to obtain data describing the core components of a geriatric acute care model. The input of 306 “stakeholders” (clinicians, administrators, consumers, educators, and researchers) was obtained through a world wide web interface, supplemented with consumer interviews.

Findings

The findings yielded eight clusters describing components of a geriatric acute care program: guiding principles, leadership, organizational structures, physical environment, patient‐ and family‐centered approaches, aging‐sensitive practices, geriatric staff competence, and interdisciplinary resources and processes. A total of 113 items that describe dimensions of quality were identified with these clusters.

Practical implications

The clusters and dimensions provide a framework for a hospital to use to plan, implement, and evaluate an acute care model for older adults.

Originality/value

There is not a common understanding of what constitutes a comprehensive set of resources, programs, and activities to address the needs of hospitalized older adults and their families and the staff who serve them. Concept mapping was an effective method of engaging the perspectives of various stakeholders in creating a framework to address these needs, as well as useful in illuminating areas for future research.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

381

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Jennifer Bowerman

365

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1960

ONLY one or two topics of the Scarborough Conference will remain firmly in the minds of most of us. Most firmly, and more clearly than before, will be that of the National Lending…

Abstract

ONLY one or two topics of the Scarborough Conference will remain firmly in the minds of most of us. Most firmly, and more clearly than before, will be that of the National Lending Library and Dr. Urquhart's exposition of it or what it is intended to be. It may give no comfort, so far as librarianship is concerned, to existing librarians, but there is little that the public librarian has to fear from it. The second impression that remains is the acute awareness now prevalent of the need for science and technical training in school and college for many more men and women and our relation to that fact. The third was the so often expressed nervousness about the status of the librarian. Fourthly, was the local collection in the light of the ever‐changing character and habits of the people. The President's address was a dignified and grave statement of ideals, in the definition of libraries and librarianship, in book acquirement, reader‐service and in appreciation of the personalities who have made librarianship. It did not produce the press so fine an utterance demanded. What are we to say of the heading a great London paper gave to its two‐inch paragraph devoted to the first day of our Conference: “Librarians are told to be courteous”? To our regret we were unable to hear Mr. O'Leary's paper; judging from the summary in the Programme it was a fine exercise in robust commonsense. We content ourselves in this Editorial with further remarks on one or two of the matters we have mentioned above.

Details

New Library World, vol. 62 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Joseph York Thomas and David P. Biros

The study of deception and the theories, which have been developed have relied heavily on laboratory experiments in controlled environments, using American college students…

Abstract

Purpose

The study of deception and the theories, which have been developed have relied heavily on laboratory experiments in controlled environments, using American college students participating in mock scenarios. The purpose of this paper is to validate previous deception detection research in a real-world, high stakes environment where the unit of analysis is the question–response pair.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used previously confirmed linguistic and paralinguistic speech cues and the constructs of deception in an attempt to validate a leading deception theory, interpersonal deception theory (IDT). A combination of descriptive and predictive analysis was conducted to best understand the relationship between speech cues and changes in the subjects’ behavior.

Findings

The result validates IDT with mixed results on individual measures and their constructs. However, there is clear evidence across the 711 question-response pairs that not only was it possible to differentiate truth from deceptive behavior but also patterns of behavior can be seen over time.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the real-world nature of the study, it is difficult to generalize the results to a larger population. However, one implication for future research is the development of methods to capture, process and prepare raw speech into data ready for analysis.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to fill the gap between the controlled mock scenarios and the harsh reality of real-world deception.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

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