Search results

1 – 10 of 68
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Per Dannemand Andersen, Birgitte Rasmussen, Marianne Strange and Jens Haisler

The purpose is to report on a Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology foresight project carried out in 2004.

1441

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to report on a Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology foresight project carried out in 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

The foresight process had the following key elements: review of international technology foresight projects on nano‐technology; mapping of Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology; broad internet survey among interested parties; expert reports; workshops related to the expert reports; analysis of the dynamics of innovation within nano‐technology; survey on hazards and environmental and ethical aspects; group interviews with members of the public.

Findings

The article reflects on the following methodological issues: domain classification and its influence on conclusions; the use of statements or hypotheses; trustworthiness of the foresight process and its recommendations.

Practical implications

Recommendations from the project have already been used in decision‐making on R&D funding and in strategic deliberation in publicly funded institutions conducting R&D. Others are expected to be used for decision‐making, and some are being discussed in research councils and ministries or are being investigated and developed further. Moreover, the foresight process has created broader awareness of, and debate especially about, the hazardous aspects of nano‐technology among researchers and decision makers.

Originality/value

The article contribute the to the European experiences with national level foresight exercises. The case and the findings are of value for science and innovation policy makers, foresight practitioners and scolars within the field.

Details

Foresight, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Documents on and from the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-909-8

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Jan-Willem Bullee, Lorena Montoya, Marianne Junger and Pieter Hartel

When security managers choose to deploy a smart lock activation system, the number of units needed and their location needs to be established. This study aims to present the…

1525

Abstract

Purpose

When security managers choose to deploy a smart lock activation system, the number of units needed and their location needs to be established. This study aims to present the results of a penetration test involving smart locks in the context of building security. The authors investigated how the amount of effort an employee has to invest in complying with a security policy (i.e. walk from the office to the smart key activator) influences vulnerability. In particular, the attractiveness of a no-effort alternative (i.e. someone else walking from your office to the key activators to perform a task on your behalf) was evaluated. The contribution of this study relates to showing how experimental psychology can be used to determine the cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of physical building security measures.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-seven different “offenders” visited the offices of 116 employees. Using a script, each offender introduced a problem, provided a solution and asked the employee to hand over their office key.

Findings

A total of 58.6 per cent of the employees handed over their keys to a stranger; no difference was found between female and male employees. The likelihood of handing over the keys for employees close to a key activator was similar to that of those who were further away.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that installing additional key activators is not conducive to reducing the building’s security vulnerability associated with the handing over of keys to strangers.

Originality/value

No research seems to have investigated the distribution of smart key activators in the context of a physical penetration test. This research highlights the need to raise awareness of social engineering and of the vulnerabilities introduced via smart locks (and other smart systems).

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

ULF JOHANSON and MARIANNE NILSON

Human resource costing and accounting (HRCA) has been the subject of much model construction but there has been little research as to how these models are utilised in practical…

Abstract

Human resource costing and accounting (HRCA) has been the subject of much model construction but there has been little research as to how these models are utilised in practical decision‐making and implementation. This issue is addressed in three studies covering different aspects of HRCA. The first study shows that decisions are influenced in an experimental situation by HRCA information in such a way that the decisions are made in accordance with the content of the information. In the second study, the stimulating and inhibiting factors of force‐field analysis are used to examine a possible implementation of the methods of HRCA. In the third study, developments some years after a number of managers have come into contact with HRCA are examined. The conclusion is that HRCA has been useful as a basis for decisions or actions concerning human resource decision‐making

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Marianne Moore

Despite a tendency by criminologists and practitioners to deny female aggression and assume the inevitability of male aggression, this article, based on interviews with young men…

Abstract

Despite a tendency by criminologists and practitioners to deny female aggression and assume the inevitability of male aggression, this article, based on interviews with young men and women supervised by an inner London youth offending team, argues that both males and females experience and direct their aggression in similar ways. It contends that the finding of this study indicates that, among these young people, conceptions of appropriate gendered behaviour, and hence conceptions of masculinity and femininity, are continuously evolving.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Jenny Rendahl, Peter Korp, Marianne Pipping Ekström and Christina Berg

The purpose of this paper is to explore and elucidate adolescents’ reasoning about risks related to food and eating.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and elucidate adolescents’ reasoning about risks related to food and eating.

Design/methodology/approach

Boys and girls aged 15-16 years participated in a focus group interview with role-playing as a stimulus for discussion and reflection. In all, 31 participants took part, divided into five groups. In the role-playing, the participants portrayed agents who they perceived to give messages about food. In the focus group they discussed their experience of carrying out the role-play, and how they usually cope with conflicting messages, preferences and needs regarding food and eating.

Findings

The findings suggested that there were two main themes of risk profiling related to eating. One concerned bodily risk related to the food ingested and included concerns both about not reaching health and performance due to the unfavourable intake of calories, nutrients, additives, bacteria, viruses and parasites, and threats to immediate well-being following consumption. The second main category concerned the risk of being conspicuous, or “sticking out”, which incorporated food-based gender norms and norms related to table manners. In practice, the risk of not displaying an appropriate image of themselves through their food and eating choices was more prominent than risk perceptions related to impacts of food choices on well-being and performance. Difficulties in classifying foods as “good” or “bad” enhanced their uncertainty.

Originality/value

The results suggest that health-promotion activities for young people should focus not only on how to feed their bodies but also on how to avoid feeding their anxieties.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1975

MARIANNE CALMANN

THE COMTAT is an area of France which stretches from Avignon to the Mont Ventoux eastward, down to Cavaillon in the south, and north to Vaison‐la‐Romaine. It has not existed as a…

Abstract

THE COMTAT is an area of France which stretches from Avignon to the Mont Ventoux eastward, down to Cavaillon in the south, and north to Vaison‐la‐Romaine. It has not existed as a separate entity since the French Revolution, when it ceased being Papal territory, but the locals have a strong sense of history, and the Comtat has kept its identity. In this small area—about twenty‐five miles across and about forty from north to south—there are three libraries of importance.

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2005

Chester Whitney Wright (1879–1966) received his A.B. in 1901, A.M. in 1902 and Ph.D. in 1906, all from Harvard University. After teaching at Cornell University during 1906–1907…

Abstract

Chester Whitney Wright (1879–1966) received his A.B. in 1901, A.M. in 1902 and Ph.D. in 1906, all from Harvard University. After teaching at Cornell University during 1906–1907, he taught at the University of Chicago from 1907 to 1944. Wright was the author of Economic History of the United States (1941, 1949); editor of Economic Problems of War and Its Aftermath (1942), to which he contributed a chapter on economic lessons from previous wars, and other chapters were authored by John U. Nef (war and the early industrial revolution) and by Frank H. Knight (the war and the crisis of individualism); and co-editor of Materials for the Study of Elementary Economics (1913). Wright’s Wool-Growing and the Tariff received the David Ames Wells Prize for 1907–1908, and was volume 5 in the Harvard Economic Studies. I am indebted to Holly Flynn for assistance in preparing Wright’s biography and in tracking down incomplete references; to Marianne Johnson in preparing many tables and charts; and to F. Taylor Ostrander, as usual, for help in transcribing and proofreading.

Details

Further University of Wisconsin Materials: Further Documents of F. Taylor Ostrander
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-166-8

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Jonatan Södergren and Niklas Vallström

The twofold aim of this theory-building article is to raise questions about the ability of queer cinema to transform market culture and ideologies around gender and sexuality…

2880

Abstract

Purpose

The twofold aim of this theory-building article is to raise questions about the ability of queer cinema to transform market culture and ideologies around gender and sexuality. First, the authors examine how the very capitalization of queer signifiers may compromise the dominant order from within. Second, the authors address how brands possibly can draw on these signifiers to project authenticity.

Design/methodology/approach

Through visual methods of film criticism and the semiotic analysis of three films (Moonlight, Call Me By Your Name and Portrait of a Lady on Fire), the authors outline some profound narrative tensions addressed by movie makers seeking to give an authentic voice to queer lives.

Findings

Brands can tap into these narrative attempts at “seeing the invisible” to signify authenticity. False sublation, i.e. the “catch-22” of commodifying the queer imaginaries one seeks to represent, follows from a Marcusean analysis.

Practical implications

In more practical terms, “seeing the invisible” is proposed as a cultural branding technique. To be felicitous, one has to circumvent three narrative traditions: pathologization, rationalization and trivialization.

Originality/value

In contrast to Marcuse's pessimist view emphasizing its affirmative aspects, the authors conclude that such commodification in the long term may have transformative effects on the dominant ideology. This is because even if something is banished to the realm of imagination, e.g. through aesthetic semblance, it can still be enacted in real life.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Jan-Willem Bullee, Lorena Montoya, Marianne Junger and Pieter Hartel

The purpose of this study is to explore how the opening phrase of a phishing email influences the action taken by the recipient.

1824

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how the opening phrase of a phishing email influences the action taken by the recipient.

Design/methodology/approach

Two types of phishing emails were sent to 593 employees, who were asked to provide personally identifiable information (PII). A personalised spear phishing email opening was randomly used in half of the emails.

Findings

Nineteen per cent of the employees provided their PII in a general phishing email, compared to 29 per cent in the spear phishing condition. Employees having a high power distance cultural background were more likely to provide their PII, compared to those with a low one. There was no effect of age on providing the PII requested when the recipient’s years of service within the organisation is taken into account.

Practical implications

This research shows that success is higher when the opening sentence of a phishing email is personalised. The resulting model explains victimisation by phishing emails well, and it would allow practitioners to focus awareness campaigns to maximise their effect.

Originality/value

The innovative aspect relates to explaining spear phishing using four socio-demographic variables.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

1 – 10 of 68