Search results

1 – 4 of 4
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Marianne Lefebvre, Dimitre Nikolov, Sergio Gomez-y-Paloma and Minka Chopeva

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the determinants of agricultural insurance adoption in Bulgaria, using a purpose-built survey of 224 farmers interviewed in 2011…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the determinants of agricultural insurance adoption in Bulgaria, using a purpose-built survey of 224 farmers interviewed in 2011. The insurance decision is analyzed conjointly with other risk management decisions on the farm such as having contracts with retailers or processors, diversifying farm activities and using irrigation.

Design/methodology/approach

The agricultural insurance sector in Bulgaria is presented in the broader context of the transition to a market-oriented economy and integration of Bulgarian agriculture into the EU Common Agricultural Policy. The recent developments on the determinants of farm insurance adoption in the agricultural economics and finance literature are discussed. A multivariate probit model is used in order to determine the factors explaining the adoption or non-adoption of various risk management tools by the surveyed farmers, including farm insurance.

Findings

The authors find that farmers with diversified activities, using irrigation or having contracts with retailers or processors, are more likely to adopt insurance, after controlling for farms and farmers’ structural characteristics. Additionally, the authors find that the main characteristics distinguishing farmers who purchase agricultural insurance from non-users are farm size and farm location. The existence of strong regional effect suggests the importance of adapting the insurance products to the different regional contexts in Bulgaria.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the (limited) literature on agricultural insurance adoption in transition countries, currently shifting from a system where compensation against natural hazards tended to come from a State damage mitigation fund, inherited from the centrally planned governments to private and voluntary agricultural insurance. This research provides a unique data source on the Bulgarian case study.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Language of Illness and Death on Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-479-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

François-Xavier de Vaujany, Emmanuelle Vaast, Stewart R. Clegg and Jeremy Aroles

The purpose of this paper is to understand how historical materialities might play a contemporary role in legitimation processes through the memorialization of history and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how historical materialities might play a contemporary role in legitimation processes through the memorialization of history and its reproduction in the here-and-now of organizations and organizing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors briefly review the existing management and organization studies (MOS) literature on legitimacy, space and history; engage with the work of Merleau-Ponty to explore how organizational legitimacy is managed in time and space; and use the case of two Parisian universities to illustrate the main arguments of the paper.

Findings

The paper develops a history-based phenomenological perspective on legitimation processes constitutive of four possibilities identified by means of chiasms: heterotopic spatial legacy, thin spatial legacy, institutionalized spatial legacy and organizational spatial legacy.

Research limitations/implications

The authors discuss the implications of this research for the neo-institutional literature on organizational legitimacy, research on organizational space and the field of management history.

Originality/value

This paper takes inspiration from the work of Merleau-Ponty on chiasms to conceptualize how the temporal layers of space and place that organizations inhabit and inherit (which we call “spatial legacies”), in the process of legitimation, evoke a sensible tenor.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Partha Sarathi Roy and Paromita Goswami

The purpose of this paper is to argue for an integrative model of social enterprises (SE) and social marketing (SM) to usher in desirable change, instead of the currently…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue for an integrative model of social enterprises (SE) and social marketing (SM) to usher in desirable change, instead of the currently adopted either/or approach. We offer the shadow framework to integrate these two paradigms in the context of peace-building organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using purposive sampling strategy, 19 cases of peacebuilding initiatives were identified and reviewed from secondary sources. Ashoka Fellows working in the domain of peacebuilding, along with a few other exemplary cases across the globe were considered.

Findings

We found an emerging typology of three forms in the organizational responses to peacebuilding initiatives: (a) pure charity-driven work, (b) dual structure of charity plus business enterprises, and (c) social enterprises with distinct revenue model.

Research limitations/implications

Building upon previous theoretical research, we find a lot of merit in SEs adopting the SM toolkit. We contribute to theory building by showing the interaction between paradox theory and stakeholder marketing in the context of SEs dealing with wicked problems such as peacebuilding. Consequently, we propose a shadow social marketing (SSM) model that would camouflage the real offering of peace through an apparent offering that would be non-controversial in nature and result in moderate-importance small wins for the multiple stakeholders involved with conflicting interests.

Practical implications

From a managerial perspective, chances of success of the desired social change increases by complementing the efforts of SEs through the SM toolkit. Organizationally, although all the three forms of peacebuilding initiatives can benefit from systematic usage of the SSM, they need to reframe their efforts toward those that are not pro-peace, rather than preach to the converted. Consequently, the answer may lie in efforts at building cultural sensitivity to promote entrepreneurship amongst such target groups amongst such target groups in conflicting communities, with an organizational form that successfully marries SEs and SM.

Originality/value

Though previous scholarship mentions the need for finding complementarities between social marketing objectives and social enterprise missions, no paper yet has suggested a roadmap for achieving it. This paper highlights an integrative plan that, in this specific case of peacebuilding initiatives, or social enterprises in general, can leverage to evolve better organizational practices, improve financial sustainability and measurable impact to effect the desired social change.

1 – 4 of 4