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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2017

Mark Scott Rosenbaum, Germán Contreras Ramírez, Karen Edwards, Jiyeon Kim, Jeffery M. Campbell and Marianne C. Bickle

This paper aims to offer insights into the impact of digitization technology on consumer goods manufacturers and retail organizations. The authors propose that the “next…

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1408

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer insights into the impact of digitization technology on consumer goods manufacturers and retail organizations. The authors propose that the “next phase” of digitization will entail the employment of digitization technology to offer consumers personalized product offerings and recommendations based on their internal biomarkers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on past investigations into digitization and their retailing experience to speculate on how the next phase of digitization will affect both consumer goods manufacturers and retailers.

Findings

The next phase of digitization will entail the use of nutrigenomics (DNA sequencing), exhaled breath analysis, fitness tracker devices, sensory patches, radio frequency identification tags and quantum ID tags to create customized and recommend products, and support product-to-customer communication regarding authenticity.

Research limitations/implications

Consumers will increasingly rely on technology to inform them of their bodily needs and to receive personalized solutions to help satisfy those needs. Consumer behavior theories must be reconsidered because consumers will become more passive participants in retail consumption as they rely on technology for need-recognition and product-fulfillment.

Social implications

Digitization technologies that use consumers’ biomarkers for new product creation or product recommendation raise new risks and uncertainty. For example, the legal implications of an incorrect product recommendation based on customer biomarkers are unknown. Furthermore, retailers would need to maintain data privacy of biomarker data and be responsible for data breaches.

Originality/value

The research explores how digitization will affect consumers’ in-store experiences with consumer goods products.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Danielle Marie Razalan, Marianne C. Bickle, Joohyung Park and Deborah Brosdahl

The purpose of this paper is to identify the types of social responsibility actions that small local retailers implement in their local community and to explore their…

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1440

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the types of social responsibility actions that small local retailers implement in their local community and to explore their underlying motivations and perceived benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research method is used to explore small local retailers’ social responsibility practices and underlying motivations. Owners/managers of small apparel retailers in the USA were interviewed and their responses transcribed and analyzed.

Findings

Findings highlight that local retailers are active in giving back to their community using various means from monetary donations to promotion of community events. Such contributions to their local community are largely driven by their affection for the community, and the motivation is to maintain a good reputation. It was also found that episodes of giving were also triggered externally by customers, local organizations, and local events. Small retailers’ social responsibility contributions to the community are typically not undertaken in an effort to stimulate sales, profits and/or customer traffic. Rather, local retailers find their experiences enjoyable and their contributions build a sense of connection to the community. These retailers enjoy an extra sense of enrichment and perceive social benefits accrued from actively engaging in social responsibility within the community.

Originality/value

Much has been written about social responsibility from a manufacturing and large retailer viewpoint, but there is a dearth of information on small local retailers. This study explores the understanding of small businesses’ social responsibility practices from a local retail perspective and provides valuable insights about retailers approach to social responsibility in relation to their local community.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Marianne C. Bickle and Rich Harrill

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the current special issue of research related to cultural misconceptions during the globalization of tourism.

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2990

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the current special issue of research related to cultural misconceptions during the globalization of tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

The four peer reviewed articles presented in this special issue are introduced.

Findings

All of the research articles examine the potential or actual result of misconceptions when different cultures interact. Culture identity is a common theme throughout the articles. Sub‐themes include how cultural identity is changed (positively or negatively) when other cultures interact. The data collection sites include: Zakopane, a small village of 30,000 residents located in the Tatra Mountains in the South of Poland; Ubud, a village in Bali, Indonesia; Great Britain and Ireland; Shandong, China; and a framework to compare data collected throughout different cultures in Asia. The first two articles presented examine the influence of tourism on a village. The third article focuses on service providers working in large cities. The fourth article examines what is considered to be the fastest growing tourist destination (i.e. China). Finally, the last article provides the reader with a theoretical framework.

Originality/value

The special issue on misconceptions addresses how the interaction of different cultures, for all the benefits, may also have negative repercussion on the host country and tourist. Instead of the traditional all white American sample, this call generated global insight. This article provides an introduction

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2010

Abstract

Details

Tourism-Marketing Performance Metrics and Usefulness Auditing of Destination Websites
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-901-5

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2009

Abstract

Details

Perspectives on Cross-Cultural, Ethnographic, Brand Image, Storytelling, Unconscious Needs, and Hospitality Guest Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-604-5

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2011

Abstract

Details

Tourism Sensemaking: Strategies to Give Meaning to Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-853-4

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Sujie Wang, Marianne Bickle and Rich Harrill

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test the reliability of six tourism scales based on Ap and Crompton's research.

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2684

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test the reliability of six tourism scales based on Ap and Crompton's research.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to test the scale, the authors examine differences between genders' tourism beliefs, tourism evaluation, and perceptions of the impact of tourism throughout Shandong China. The sampling frame in this study includes residents over 18 years of age and living more than a year in Shandong Province. As an experimental study, a convenience sampling method is employed to select samples. The sample distribution of each of the 17 cities of Shandong Province equals the multiplied products of the total samples (760) and the percentage of its population in the total population of Shandong.

Findings

The tourism scale is shown to be reliable. The data illustrate the benefits and challenges of an emerging destination within an emerging national tourism product. In Shandong, residents acknowledged tourism's positive social benefits such as better shopping facilities, while at the same time recognizing the negative impact of tourism on the natural environment.

Originality/value

Residents' perceptions of tourism and its impact to the community has primarily been conducted in the USA. Of the research, limited data exists which examines differences between genders' perceptions of the benefits tourism may bring to a region. This study compares males' versus females' perceptions of the changes tourism development has to the Shandong province in China. This study offers insights into different perspectives by gender and culture.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2019

Greg Morgan

Abstract

Details

Rewriting Leadership with Narrative Intelligence: How Leaders Can Thrive in Complex, Confusing and Contradictory Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-776-4

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