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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Amy Klemm Verbos and Maria T. Humphries

The purpose of this paper is to bring wider‐reaching feminism to confluence with relational indigenous values for transformative responses to systemic exclusion.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring wider‐reaching feminism to confluence with relational indigenous values for transformative responses to systemic exclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors critique the prevailing (corporate) institutional logic in higher education through their stories and experiences, weaving in diverse feminist perspectives. Liberal feminist perspectives, the most visible gender critique, may merely increase numerical equality, diversifying the biographical characteristics of privilege. Exclusion for many is systemically retained. The authors argue that relational logics underpinning indigenous worldviews hold generative potential for institutional change toward deeper inclusiveness and justice.

Findings

Liberal feminists' two‐fold transformative aspirations for gender equality and deeper respect for currently marginalized “feminine” values leave room for deeper and wider reflection on how indigenous perspectives might contribute to institutional change.

Practical implications

This exploration may be applied to university recruiting, selection, evaluation, and promotion policies; articulating and assessing career competencies and trajectories; curriculum evaluation; organizational and management research; and pedagogical development and research.

Social implications

An indigenous critique of liberal feminism and indigenous perspectives on justice, relationality, and inclusivity may enhance social, university, corporate, community, and family life.

Originality/value

Interweaving feminist and indigenous insights into a critique of the prevailing corporate institutional logic informing organizational practice – in higher education and all sectors of society, it highlights the generative potential of indigenous contributions and encourages inclusion of diverse indigenous perspectives in organization theory and practice.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Amy Klemm Verbos and Maria T. Humphries

The Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) are a United Nations led initiative that includes a mandate to engage with voices generally marginalized in…

Abstract

Purpose

The Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) are a United Nations led initiative that includes a mandate to engage with voices generally marginalized in business classrooms. The voices of Indigenous peoples are among such marginalized voices. Inclusion of indigenous worldviews offer opportunities to enhance the capacity of the PRME to contribute to more just and sustainable management and development of humanity. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

PRME Principle One inspires opportunities to integrate the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (DRIP) and through this confluence, contribute to manifesting the espoused aspirations of the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) – i.e. the transformation of poverty and environmental degradation toward universal human and environmental thriving.

Findings

Greater attention to relational ethics through critical pedagogy encourages reflection on the paradoxes of the market logic that permeates management education. The outcome in practice of this logic appears to result in ever increasing disparity. Its unfettered trajectory risks both people and planet. An indigenous call to respect all life, including that of the planet, brings the principles of universal inclusiveness to light in a compelling way.

Originality/value

This essay is unique in its call to construe together the PRME, UNGC, Business Reference Guide (BRG), and the DRIP to progress aspirations of inclusiveness and sustainability; and contribute indigenous worldviews for their intrinsic value in critical reflection on the damage caused by the market logic endemic to management education.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Sheeba Asirvatham and Maria Humphries

This paper aims to invite reflection and action among scholars of gender in management to the shaping and meeting of commitments to universal justice.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to invite reflection and action among scholars of gender in management to the shaping and meeting of commitments to universal justice.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 12 women employed as senior scholars in public universities in Aotearoa New Zealand were invited to discuss their career experiences. An observed disjuncture between radical feminist analyses of their career experiences and their liberal feminist responses to issues arising for them prompted reflection on a wider disjuncture in the shaping of justice wherever neoliberal directives prevail, generating this paper’s activist call to integrity between analyses and practice among scholars as agents of change.

Findings

Implications drawn from the conversations with participants vindicated earlier critiques of diversity management under the conditions of neoliberalism when accommodating damaging social outcomes and systemic compliance is morally compromising.

Originality/value

Exploring accommodation of system preserving career strategies of scholars claiming commitment to justice is an evocative and original call to scholarly activism.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 December 2019

Sheeba Asirvatham and Maria Humphries-Kil

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on career aspirations and experiences explored with senior women organizational scholars employed in neoliberally driven public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on career aspirations and experiences explored with senior women organizational scholars employed in neoliberally driven public universities in Aotearoa (New Zealand) legally mandated to serve as a critic and conscience of society.

Design/methodology/approach

Over the 18 months period, three sequential research conversations were conducted with each of 12 participants known for their commitment to social justice and planetary well-being. The conversational approach allowed for spontaneous participant-lead development of ideas. Sequencing of conversations allowed for reflection on matters raised in previous conversations.

Findings

Vitality and creativity deemed essential to scholarly careers were reportedly under pressure. Career concepts in use indicate a protean commitment to self-direction but also recognized constraints of institutionally driven neoliberal output regimes. Detrimental impacts of neoliberal values permeating their employing institutions were offered spontaneously often in radical feminist terms but paradoxically given liberal feminist remedies.

Research limitations/implications

The 12 diverse transcripts of participant conversations generated remarkable similarities that indicate the influence of career articulations on the social construction of reality. The implications of this interpretation invite further reflection on the consequences of normalization of career metaphors and their implication in the intensification of institutional control, the weakening of professional autonomy and the system preserving restriction of career-related responsibilities.

Practical implications

Highlighting constraints to creativity and vitality necessary for scholarly work can inform further research into professional influences on justice and environmental matters in and beyond the Academy.

Social implications

In this paper a short review of Aotearoa (New Zealand) as in vanguard of neoliberal intensification globally, the implication of this doctrine in neoliberally driven universities and the impacts on career opportunities, degradations and responsibilities of scholars are explored.

Originality/value

The conversational research process contrasts with more tightly framed empirical research methods by generating spontaneous participant-led articulations of career-related dynamics explored and expanded over subsequent conversations.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Tribal Wisdom for Business Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-288-0

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Linda J. Twiname, Maria Humphries and Kate Kearins

As part of an ongoing project on worker well‐being, this paper aims to examine the application of flexible work arrangements through the experiences of core workers in a…

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Abstract

Purpose

As part of an ongoing project on worker well‐being, this paper aims to examine the application of flexible work arrangements through the experiences of core workers in a small, European‐owned, New Zealand manufacturing firm.

Design/methodology/approach

A participatory action research approach is taken.

Findings

The research reveals that flexible employment arrangements utilised in this firm did not afford protection to core workers as theory suggests. Both core and peripheral workers were exposed to pressure primarily to extend their hours of work and to reduce their expectations regarding remuneration. Production level increases were not reflected in increases in numbers of core workers; in fact perceived job security was low. Core workers felt pressure to work extended hours out of their commitment to the firm, each other, and to maintain their own employment.

Practical implications

The use of more democratic processes inherent in action research oriented at workplace well‐being are shown to have had some value toward enhancing worker well‐being.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that the participative project placed pressure upon management and that it had the potential to redress a power imbalance within the employment relationship.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Maria Humphries and Michelle St Jane

The purpose of this paper is to disenchant advocates of sustainability of the current form of capitalism and to argue that under current intensification of globalisation…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to disenchant advocates of sustainability of the current form of capitalism and to argue that under current intensification of globalisation of economic and political efforts, “privilege” and “alienation” might be relocated/rearranged/redistributed but that the basic dynamic will remain constant. The very poor and vulnerable appear to be treated as collateral damage by capitalist practices reified as “The Market” and which we have personified as “The Master”.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on the metaphor of subaltern studies to amplify their call for further discussion. Portraying the economic system as The (ruthless) Master invites further conversation about complicity or subjugation and invites reflection on alternatives to associated agency.

Findings

The Master's powers are amplifying globally. He continues to demand sacrifices. The most recent demand comes in the call for the protection of his economy at the expense of those to be most affected by climate change. These sacrifices are to be enacted by the willing high priests, the compliant, and the ignorant. Their sacrificial lambs are those who are forcibly harnessed to a system that exploits them, who become dependent on that system for survival, and who may be summarily dismissed when their “usefulness” is deemed diminished. The paper is here concerned with the people whose alternatives are reduced or destroyed and with the tolerance of this destruction of lives and livelihoods by an enabling population.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is an invitation to continued conversation, not a research paper in the positivist sense. The paper may be viewed as an experiment to see how far alternative perspectives can flourish in the academy and in our classrooms, boardrooms, and cafeterias. Conversations are posited as a means of change – of self and society.

Practical implications

This paper invites practitioners and academics to engage with critical self‐reflection as a necessary aspect for transformational learning and leadership. The extent to which positivists models of knowing prevail, papers more exploratory of diverse ontologies may be diminished or dismissed with significant implications for the enhancement or depletion of (intellectual and spiritual) diversity.

Social implications

The attractiveness of “sustainability” discourses are a mixed blessing. They may be generated to unsettle and used to transform ways of knowing and being that have led to the current crises facing humanity. The proffered remedies for these crises may also enable The Master to become better informed and more able to assimilate those who criticise. A subaltern position would make this less likely.

Originality/value

The value of an amplified subaltern voice lies in the honing of more critical insights and thus the discovery of not only more creative technical solutions to issues of sustainability and justice but the co‐creation of covenants that may generate a form of human and environmental flourishing beyond the Wealth of Corpor‐Nations.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Tourism Research Paradigms: Critical and Emergent Knowledges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-929-4

Abstract

Details

Tourism Research Paradigms: Critical and Emergent Knowledges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-929-4

Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2022

Manuela Gomez-Valencia, Camila Vargas, Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez, Indianna Minto-Coy, Miguel Cordova, Karla Maria Nava-Aguirre, Fabiola Monje-Cueto, Cyntia Vilasboas Calixto Casnici and Freddy Coronado

This study identifies measures to recover economic growth and build sustainable societies and markets in post-COVID-19 scenarios – with a perspective of resilience and…

Abstract

This study identifies measures to recover economic growth and build sustainable societies and markets in post-COVID-19 scenarios – with a perspective of resilience and adaptability to climate change and massive biodiversity loss. Additionally, this study uncovers the interventions implemented to address economic, environmental and social consequences of past crises based on a systematic literature review. Specifically, this chapter provides answers to the following six questions:

  1. What has been done in the past to rebuild social, economic and environmental balance after global crises?

  2. Where (geographical region) did the analysis on measures taken concentrate?

  3. When have scholars analysed past measures to rebuild business and society after a global crisis?

  4. How did the past measures to rebuild business and society after the global crisis take place?

  5. Who promotes the measures to rebuild business and society after a global crisis takes place?

  6. Why is it important to study the previous literature on past measures to rebuild business and society after a global crisis takes place?

What has been done in the past to rebuild social, economic and environmental balance after global crises?

Where (geographical region) did the analysis on measures taken concentrate?

When have scholars analysed past measures to rebuild business and society after a global crisis?

How did the past measures to rebuild business and society after the global crisis take place?

Who promotes the measures to rebuild business and society after a global crisis takes place?

Why is it important to study the previous literature on past measures to rebuild business and society after a global crisis takes place?

Finally, this chapter identifies future research opportunities to rebuild business and society after the past global crises.

Details

Regenerative and Sustainable Futures for Latin America and the Caribbean
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-864-8

Keywords

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