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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Esther F.J.C. van Ginneken, Hanneke Palmen, Anouk Q. Bosma, Paul Nieuwbeerta and Maria L. Berghuis

The Life in Custody (LIC) Study is a nationwide prospective cohort study examining the quality of prison life in the Netherlands. The purpose of this paper is to describe…

Abstract

Purpose

The Life in Custody (LIC) Study is a nationwide prospective cohort study examining the quality of prison life in the Netherlands. The purpose of this paper is to describe Dutch prisoners’ perceptions of prison climate, as well as differences across regimes.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population of the study consisted of all male and female adult prisoners in the Netherlands who were incarcerated in various regimes in a total of 28 prisons, between January and April 2017. An intensive and personal recruitment strategy was employed. Participants completed a detailed survey, the prison climate questionnaire (PCQ). Self-reported information on a variety of topics was collected, including perceived prison climate, well-being and self-reported behaviour.

Findings

In total, 4,938 prisoners participated in the survey, which amounts to a high response rate of 81 per cent. Analyses show that respondents’ characteristics are almost identical to those of non-respondents. Ratings of prison climate vary across domains and regimes, with more positive scores for minimum-security regimes.

Practical implications

A detailed methodological approach is described that can be adopted to achieve a high response rate with survey research among prisoners. The paper alerts researchers and practitioners to a large ongoing study and first findings on prison climate in the Netherlands. The PCQ can be requested from the authors and used in future research (internationally) to gain information about the perceived quality of prison life. The paper gives insight in how different regimes are associated with differences in perceived prison climate. Collaboration on the research project can be sought with the authors.

Originality/value

Findings of the LIC study illustrate the value of having data on prison climate. Results of the study will contribute to more knowledge on imprisonment and what can be done to improve the humane treatment of offenders by the criminal justice system. Moreover, knowledge about the methodology of the study may enable future comparative research on prison climate.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Jose M. Sanchez, Maria L. Velez, María Ángeles Ramón-Jerónimo and Pedro Araujo

The purpose of this paper is to analyze, for both parties of a distribution channel, to what extent each party perceives the counterpart’s use of performance measurement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze, for both parties of a distribution channel, to what extent each party perceives the counterpart’s use of performance measurement systems (PMS) and how this perception affects the perceiver’s own use of these systems, for either decision control or decision management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a conceptual model tested at different levels using structural equations models. A case study uses survey data from 107 distributors and 91 manufacturer managers.

Findings

PMS allow evaluation by the manufacturer and daily management by distributors; both uses of PMS can be simultaneous and complementary. Results show that each party’s perception of the counterpart’s use contributes to its own use, although real uses do not significantly influence these perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

The results must be interpreted with caution because the sample is small. This study calls for further data collection in real situations with larger samples, and for eliminating the influence of the distribution channel type. Further work is needed to analyze other constructs driving the relationship between real use and perception.

Originality/value

This study’s originality comes from the conceptual model, data set, and levels of analysis. Decoupling real use and perception, it challenges the prevailing assumption that managers accurately perceive counterpart managers’ use of PMS. Analyzing at both group and individual levels, it extends the more usual dyadic studies by recognizing that any given manager’s perception may be almost wholly formed by his/her interaction with a group of individuals.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Maria L. Granados, Souad Mohamed and Vlatka Hlupic

This paper aims to explore what social enterprises (SEs) in the UK know and how they acquire, convert, apply and protect this knowledge. This will enable them to manage…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore what social enterprises (SEs) in the UK know and how they acquire, convert, apply and protect this knowledge. This will enable them to manage their knowledge effectively and, hence, improve their practices and maximise the creation of social, environmental and economic value.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a qualitative approach, comprising 21 interviews with founders and senior members of SEs in the UK.

Findings

The results show that the investigated SEs have knowledge management (KM) practices similar to the already identified in SMEs, associated with informality, reliance on external sources and focus on socialisation activities, but they have unique challenges on managing their knowledge related to their hybrid mission, to include social and economic objectives and their closed relationship with stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

As there is limited research on KM practices in SEs; they were defined based on previous studies in large, private and public companies. Therefore, not all practices may be included. This research is a starting point in the study of KM in SEs.

Practical implications

This study identifies knowledge activities that enable the creation of social, environmental and economic value in SEs. This allows SEs, small firms and non-profit organisations to review their current practices and develop plans for their further improvement.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first empirical studies exploring KM practices in SEs, highlighting their informal nature as well as their impact in and on the enterprise.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Michelle Brown, Maria L. Kraimer and Virginia K. Bratton

Using job demands–resources (JD–R) theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of job demands (difficult performance appraisal (PA) objectives) and job…

Abstract

Purpose

Using job demands–resources (JD–R) theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of job demands (difficult performance appraisal (PA) objectives) and job resources (performance feedback and leader member exchange (LMX)) on employee reports of PA cynicism. The paper also investigates the consequences of PA cynicism on intent to quit and bad sportsmanship.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data on PA demands and resources, PA cynicism and turnover intentions were obtained from employees. Supervisors rated their employees’ level of sportsmanship.

Findings

Contrary to the predictions of JD–R theory, the authors found that employees are most likely to be cynical when they experience high levels of job resources (LMX and performance feedback) and high levels of job demands (difficult objectives).

Research limitations/implications

The study demonstrates that PA cynicism matters – employees with higher levels of PA cynicism were more likely to contemplate leaving the organization; employees with high levels of PA cynicism are rated as bad sports by their supervisors.

Practical implications

Employees are sensitive to gaps between the description and reality of a PA process which can trigger thoughts of organizational exit and ineffective work behaviors. human resource managers need to ensure that employees regard the PA process as valuable, useful and worth their time and effort.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the PA literature by investigating the role of both job resources and demands. PA research has focused on the specification of job demands, underplaying the role of job resources in employee attitudes toward PA.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Iraci de Souza João-Roland and Maria L. Granados

Identify the drivers of social innovation (SI) that bring together the main management tools and approaches associated with the creation of SI in social enterprises (SEs).

Abstract

Purpose

Identify the drivers of social innovation (SI) that bring together the main management tools and approaches associated with the creation of SI in social enterprises (SEs).

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was developed in the Web of Science, Scopus and EBSCO databases, using the keywords: social innovation, social enterprise and management. After analysis of quality and application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 54 articles were selected for full analysis.

Findings

SI process was systemised into four steps: mapping and development, consolidation, scaling up and evaluation. The drivers of SI were mapped and classified into three main factors: contextual, organisational and managerial.

Practical implications

In organisational factors, business model was emphasised, as well as partnerships, participatory culture and intrapreneurship, adequate levels of bricolage and continuous learning. The management factors included the characteristics of the entrepreneur/innovator and managerial practices, where those that facilitate teamwork and the participation of all involved are best suited. In contextual factors, the highlight was the need for support from policy makers; community participation and demand for innovations that consider local context and usability.

Originality/value

This study connects previously scattered knowledge in a generic model of SI, highlighting routines and processes used, and provides a starting point for innovators and social entrepreneurs in the complex, uncertain and often unknown process of SI. Additionally, several research gaps were identified to be addressed by future research in the context of SI management.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Rosley Anholon, Dirceu Silva, Jefferson Souza Pinto, Izabela Simon Rampasso, Maria L.C. Domingos and Janice H.O. Dias

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how COVID-19 pandemic forced several companies to reflect on their activities. Many organizational changes have been conducted and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how COVID-19 pandemic forced several companies to reflect on their activities. Many organizational changes have been conducted and others will still be necessary. Some reflections are presented, as some aspects are well consolidated in academic literature while they are neglected by many leaders of companies. The authors believe that this viewpoint can support leaders to enhance organizational development.

Design/methodology/approach

Part of the information presented here is characterized by the authors’ points of view, as it is a viewpoint. However, the authors carried out searches on scientific bases and published press reports aiming to support the reflections presented in this text.

Findings

The reflections presented in this viewpoint focus on the following aspects: periodic critical analysis of companies business models, business continuity management systems, risk management, resilience principles in supply chain management, necessary changes in production systems, occupational health and safety systems and new ways of working. For the authors, the correct conduction of these aspects can guarantee companies survival; however, many leaders worldwide still neglect them.

Originality/value

The reflections presented here can be useful for leaders interested in conducting a critical analysis in their business, considering necessary organizational changes to face the COVID-19 pandemic consequences.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Arun Kumar Tarofder, Seyed Rajab Nikhashemi, S.M. Ferdous Azam, Prashantini Selvantharan and Ahasanul Haque

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of explanation on customer satisfaction in the service failure stage. It seeks to better understand the dynamics of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of explanation on customer satisfaction in the service failure stage. It seeks to better understand the dynamics of consumer repurchase intention through a mediating effect of customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was e-mailed to collect the primary data. With three reminders, this study managed to obtain 322 responses from customers who complained about their internet service in Malaysia. Structural equation modelling techniques were applied to examine both direct and mediating effects between variables.

Findings

Results reveal that all four dimensions of explanation have significant partial mediating effect on repurchase intention through customer satisfaction. Results also disclose that there is no significant relationship between excuse and customer satisfaction in service failure. Among all dimensions, reference and apology have higher influence on repurchase intention through customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The results are particularly valuable for managers, as it supports the role of using explanation as a practical tool for fostering positive and profitable outcomes like repeat customer purchases.

Practical implications

The findings of this study will help organisations rethink their explanation strategies with the eye to foster greater customer repurchase intention.

Originality/value

The results are particularly valuable for managers, as they support the role of using explanation as a practical tool for fostering positive and profitable outcomes like repeat customer purchases.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 April 2021

Fiona Macaulay

Abstract

Details

Transforming State Responses to Feminicide: Women's Movements, Law and Criminal Justice Institutions in Brazil
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-566-0

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Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Thiago Pierobom de Ávila

This chapter demonstrates how the reception, adaption and development of gender studies in Brazil and subsequent law reform have created a new theoretical field of…

Abstract

This chapter demonstrates how the reception, adaption and development of gender studies in Brazil and subsequent law reform have created a new theoretical field of feminist criminology with a Southern approach. During the 1980s, Brazilian literature discussed gender violence according to three theories: male domination (Chauí), patriarchal domination (Saffioti) and relational violence (Gregori). Gender theories were introduced and developed during the 1990s. Decolonial studies stressed the deeper intersection of gender with race, social class and other vectors of discrimination, which increases the vulnerability of minority women, particularly black and indigenous women. The increase in gender studies supported political feminist advocacy to promote law reform, such as the Maria da Penha Law, the criminalisation of femicide, reforms related to sexual violence and women in prison. Feminist criminology has both criticised law and used it to promote gender equality on society. Judicial practices indicate the conservative resistance of the juridical field to assimilating gender debates and feminist critical theories as a whole.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-956-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

ERIC G. FLAMHOLTZ, MARIA L. BULLEN and WEI HUA

There is growing recognition that the core economic resources of the current era are human and intellectual capital, rather than physical assets such as inventories…

Abstract

There is growing recognition that the core economic resources of the current era are human and intellectual capital, rather than physical assets such as inventories, plant, and equipment. Given the increasing importance of human capital and intellectual property as determinants of economic success at both the macroeconomic and enterprise levels, it is clear that the nature of investments made by firms need to shift to reflect the new economic realities. Specifically, if human capital is a key determinant of organizational success, then investments in training and development of people also become critical. In turn, there is a need to develop concepts and tools for monitoring and evaluating management development programs in terms of their impact, results, and value or return on investment. The specific objective of this article is to draw upon the concepts and measurement approaches of the field that has come to be known as “human resource accounting” and show how they, specifically the stochastic rewards valuation model, can be used as tools for the measurement of the value of investments in training programs designed to increase the value of human capital.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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