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1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Maria Huge-Brodin, Edward Sweeney and Pietro Evangelista

Various suggested paths for greening logistics and supply chains often address the specific perspectives of single supply chain actors. Drawing on stakeholder theory, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Various suggested paths for greening logistics and supply chains often address the specific perspectives of single supply chain actors. Drawing on stakeholder theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a deeper understanding of the alignment between logistics service providers (LSPs) and shippers in the context of adopting more environmentally sustainable logistics practices.

Design/methodology/approach

With a case study approach, a dual perspective is taken in which both LSPs and shippers were researched. The cases comprise eight LSPs and six shipper companies in Sweden, Italy and Ireland. Information was first analysed in relation to levels of environmental awareness, customer requirements and provider offerings and critical success factors (CSFs) and inhibitors. In a second step, the findings were analysed using stakeholder theory.

Findings

LSPs demonstrate higher ambition levels and more concrete offerings compared to shippers' requirements for green logistics services. Paradoxically, customers are an important CSF and also an inhibitor for both LSPs and shippers. Both LSPs and shippers perceive financial factors and senior management priorities as important CSFs. The application of stakeholder theory helps to illuminate the importance of the many secondary stakeholders vs that of one or a relatively small number of primary stakeholders.

Originality/value

The three-dimensional analysis of environmental alignment between LSPs and shippers reinforces existing knowledge and provides new insights. A novel use of stakeholder theory in a supply chain context underlines its usefulness in research of this kind.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Uni Sallnäs

Although it has been suggested that shippers’ demands regarding environmental practices appear to have an impact on the environmental work of LSPs, limited attention has…

1457

Abstract

Purpose

Although it has been suggested that shippers’ demands regarding environmental practices appear to have an impact on the environmental work of LSPs, limited attention has been given to environmental practices in the relationships between LSPs and shippers. The purpose of this paper is to explore how dependencies between LSPs and shippers can influence the way in which environmental practices are coordinated in the relationships between them.

Design/methodology/approach

Four dyadic case studies, each consisting of one LSP and one shipper, provide the empirical basis for this paper.

Findings

Two types of dependencies are suggested as having an influence over the coordination of environmental practices in LSP-shipper relationships: dependence between LSPs and shippers as such; and dependence with regard to specific environmental practices. In addition, the environmental ambition of the actors is found to be of relevance when LSPs and shippers coordinate environmental practices between them. Based on these parameters, different coordination mechanisms for environmental practices in LSP-shipper relationships are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to four cases in a Swedish context. Additional cases might provide other insights into LSP-shipper relationships and thereby lead to modifications of the proposed conceptual framework.

Practical implications

The results can help both LSPs and shippers improve their work with environmental practices through the use of the appropriate coordination mechanisms in their inter-organisational relationships.

Originality/value

Contrary to previous research, which mainly takes one party’s perspective, this paper takes a dyadic approach and thereby adds valuable knowledge to the inter-organisational aspects of LSPs’ environmental work.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Helén Anderson and Maria Huge Brodin

The emerging material flows of recycled goods have effects on roles, responsibilities and positions of a range of industrial actors, but also on the consumer as a part of…

5167

Abstract

Purpose

The emerging material flows of recycled goods have effects on roles, responsibilities and positions of a range of industrial actors, but also on the consumer as a part of the industrial recycling process. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the changing role and position of the final‐product customer, the consumer, as recycling is introduced into the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper, building on theory and concepts from literature on marketing channels, industrial actors and material flows. Those concepts were developed basically for traditional forward material flows, while recycling complicates their application and further development.

Findings

Through recycling the consumer is given a new role; as a supplier, however, not as a seller in traditional terms. This new nature of its role complicates the conception of the consumer's position, vis‐à‐vis the recycler. It also addresses the consumer seen as an economic entity vis‐à‐vis other actors.

Originality/value

Including recycling in the concept of material flow structures and the consumer as an actor in industrial processes becomes more and more vital; both for theory development where this is still novel, and for practice, as the mechanisms of recycling and consumer behaviour need to be better described and understood for both industry and authorities.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Maria Huge Brodin and Helén Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to develop the value concept for recycling contexts.

3007

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the value concept for recycling contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a conceptual discussion supported by empirical illustrations of value development for recycled paper and electric and electronics products.

Findings

Demonstrates the fundamental effects of applying the economic value concept for recycling. Suggests that value can be seen as negative and decreasing, besides positive and increasing. The end customer actually and voluntarily pays in both monetary terms and own work in order to help another actor further along the supply chain to exploit the value created.

Research limitations/implications

Any supply chain analysis including recycling must also consider the consumption of value. Traditional models and concepts are based on the end customer as the endpoint. In striving for a societal development towards “closing the circles” this more holistic understanding of value development becomes crucial.

Practical implications

Recycling is traditionally seen as a cost‐adding activity, for firms and also for consumers in terms of direct and indirect costs and time consumption. As industrial firms are supposed to include recycling of their products in their total business offering (e.g. product stewardships), the value creation and consumption mechanisms regarding recycling need to be better understood.

Originality/value

The value concept has been widely researched in different settings, however the value development of products and material in supply chains including recycling has not been addressed. The inclusion of the end‐customer among industrial actors in a supply chain provides a new complexity, which this paper addresses.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Glenn Johansson and Maria Huge Brodin

On the basis of empirical studies, the purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse product properties that affect performance of end‐of‐life systems for electrical…

Abstract

Purpose

On the basis of empirical studies, the purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse product properties that affect performance of end‐of‐life systems for electrical and electronic equipment (EEE).

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out as case studies of end‐of‐life management of EEE. Case A focused on disassembly of computer screens and TV‐sets, whereas Case B addressed logistics systems for recycling of various types of EEE. Data collection methods include interviews, on‐site visits and observations, video recording, and studies of documents.

Findings

In total, nine product properties that affect performance of end‐of‐life systems for EEE are identified. The properties relate to three different product levels: the product assortment, the product structure, and the component levels. A model is presented which indicates that choices made and decisions taken in the product development process affect the end‐of‐life system performance. Application of modular product architectures and component standardisation are suggested as relevant design strategies during product development.

Practical implications

The implications for managers are that the findings presented in this paper provide strengthened arguments that modular product architectures and component standardisation are favourable approaches to apply in product development. Complementary to the benefits for manufacturing and logistics also end‐of‐life system performance will improve when these approaches are applied.

Originality/value

Previous research has indicated some product properties that are supposed to influence performance of end‐of‐life systems. These properties originate primarily from conceptual discussions rather than empirical studies. This paper adds to current understanding by presenting empirically‐based insights regarding which specific product properties affect performance.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Karin Isaksson and Maria Huge‐Brodin

Awareness of environmental impacts on society is increasing among companies. In order to turn environmental problems into business opportunities, many companies are…

3696

Abstract

Purpose

Awareness of environmental impacts on society is increasing among companies. In order to turn environmental problems into business opportunities, many companies are beginning to consider how environmental, or green aspects can be integrated into their service offerings. This opportunity can be of specific interest to logistics service providers, whose core business is an environmental impact in itself. The purpose of this article is to indicate where green‐labelled logistics service providers are positioned today in their development, and to seek the underlying rationale in development of green service offerings.

Design/methodology/approach

This article takes a logistics service provider's perspective and is based on a multiple case study of six companies. The analysis is based on cross‐case analysis, and empirical, as well as theoretical, pattern matching.

Findings

The attitude towards a green approach differs among the case companies: while some are working towards a green integration throughout the entire business, others offer green alternatives to the original service offering. The results point to possible explanations for these differences, and include differences in range of service offerings, size, and to different management principles for green aspects.

Practical implications

The article can inspire logistics service providers in their continuing work to integrate green initiatives into the company. By introducing alternative green approaches in the development of service offerings, logistics service providers can match their own business and context with alternative rationales.

Originality/value

While most of the green logistics research focuses on the logistics system's characteristics, this article offers initial insights into how the integration of green aspects into logistics services can impact logistics service providers.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Håkan Aronsson and Maria Huge Brodin

This paper seeks to address how firms may contribute to environmental improvement through structural changes of their logistics systems.

11881

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to address how firms may contribute to environmental improvement through structural changes of their logistics systems.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review discloses the low interest that has been directed to environmental issues in logistics, and findings relevant for structural issues at a firm level are described. Three cases where firms have implemented different types of structural changes to their logistics systems support the analysis.

Findings

A range of different measures to succeed in environmental as well as logistics performance are presented, comprising types of consolidation, logistics standardisation, and IS/IT solutions allowing a vast restructuring of logistics systems.

Originality/value

The discussion about logistics and the environment has mostly revolved around more environmental friendly technological solutions, concerning single firms as well as governmental support for technology development. The structural, more organisational issues, have been addressed on a societal level, where solutions concern infrastructure. There is a need to reduce the amount of transport in general. The paper discusses how logistics systems' environmental performance can be improved simultaneously with a non‐reduction of logistics performance in terms of costs and delivery service.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Priscilla Navarro

The purpose of this paper is to revisit lean manufacturing and process management to review how these have targeted environmental sustainability and determine whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit lean manufacturing and process management to review how these have targeted environmental sustainability and determine whether these have the potential to achieve environmental sustainability in small- and medium-sized companies within the freight transport sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this paper was divided into three steps. The first step involved a narrative literature review, including previously designed search strings. The second step involved a snowball approach, where the identification of new sources departed from previously selected articles. The third step included a completing narrative review to search for the most recent articles published related to the purpose. The analysis was based on the identification of benefits, challenges and the potential of lean and process management to deal with environmental demands among transport companies.

Findings

The findings suggest a potential of lean and process management for achieving environmental sustainability, if adapted appropriately. The potential is on the operative and strategic levels, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

This study included two of the concepts from the quality movement from a literature perspective. Hence, there is a need for research to evaluate these results empirically. Additionally, other aspects should be studied within the quality movement for achieving environmental sustainability.

Originality/value

This paper aims to be a basis and a path for further theoretical and empirical research for the quality movement to support environmental sustainability. This paper particularly aims to fill part of the gap in the literature on how the freight transport sector can enhance environmental sustainability in its operations.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Amer Jazairy, Robin von Haartman and Maria Björklund

The green logistics literature remains undecided on how collaboration between shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) may facilitate green…

5528

Abstract

Purpose

The green logistics literature remains undecided on how collaboration between shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) may facilitate green logistics practices (GLPs). This paper identifies two types of collaboration mechanisms, relation specific and knowledge sharing, to systematically examine their influence on facilitating the different types of GLPs – as seen by shippers versus LSPs.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses of 169 shippers and 162 LSPs in Sweden were collected and analysed using exploratory- and confirmatory factor analysis, followed by multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that neither of the actors consistently favour a certain type of collaboration mechanisms for facilitating all types of GLPs. Although it was found that both actors share the same view on the role of collaboration mechanisms for some GLPs, their views took contrasting forms for others.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the green logistics literature by incorporating a trilateral distinction to present collaboration recommendations for GLPs, based on (1) the collaboration mechanism at play, (2) the actor's perspective and (3) the GLP in question.

Practical implications

Insights are offered to managers at shipper/LSP firms to apply the right (“fit for purpose”) collaboration mechanisms in their relationships with their logistics partners with respect to the desired GLPs.

Originality/value

This is one of the first large-scale studies to systematically reveal in what way collaboration can facilitate the different types of GLPs.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Maria Björklund and Helena Forslund

This study aims to illustrate how retail chains with a green image align sustainable logistics actions, logistics measurements and contracts with logistics service…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to illustrate how retail chains with a green image align sustainable logistics actions, logistics measurements and contracts with logistics service providers (LSPs), and to develop a classification model that allows for a description of the various shades of green within companies.

Design/methodology/approach

We carried out a multiple case study of four retail chains with a green image operating in the Swedish market, collecting empirical data from the retail chains’ sustainability reports and home pages and conducting interviews with logistics, transportation and supply chain managers.

Findings

Based on the literature, we developed a classification model for judging green image, green logistics actions, green measurements and green contracts. The model is used to illustrate the different shades of green found within the respective retail chains. A green image seems well-aligned with green logistics actions. However, there are more levels to judge, and the measurement systems are not sufficiently developed to track green logistics actions. Contract handling is more developed among retail chains than measurements, which is positive, as this is a way of ensuring that LSPs are involved. In our classification model, greenwashing can be judged in a more nuanced way, delving deeper under the surface.

Research limitations/implications

The provided classification model adds to our knowledge and illustrates the alignment within companies’ sustainable logistics. The robustness of the model can be strengthened by applying it to a larger number of cases and by continually validating its content and evaluation criteria.

Practical implications

The study’s main practical contribution is the classification model, which may potentially serve as a method for managers to easily judge the green alignment of a retail chain’s logistics.

Originality/value

Few empirical studies capture how retail chains measure environmental logistics performance, and even fewer concern contracts stipulating the environmental demands placed on LSPs.

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Keywords

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