Search results

1 – 10 of 36
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Ana Maria Ussman, Mário Franco and Mahomed H. Ussman

The garment industry is an important sector of the economy of Portugal and has been expanding since 1990 in terms of the volume of business conducted. Most companies are…

7294

Abstract

The garment industry is an important sector of the economy of Portugal and has been expanding since 1990 in terms of the volume of business conducted. Most companies are small and productivity is low. In the past the main basis of Portugal's competitive advantage has been low wages. This may not be sustainable in the future — this represents the biggest challenge faced by the industry. Most companies are well equipped but commercial design and industrial pattern making are perceived as weak points. The domestic market is rather small and most companies focus on export markets.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Márcia Maria Penteado Marchesini and Rosane Lúcia Chicarelli Alcântara

The purpose of this paper is to propose a set of logistics activities for each key supply chain business process of the Global Supply Chain Forum (GSCF) model and a…

4698

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a set of logistics activities for each key supply chain business process of the Global Supply Chain Forum (GSCF) model and a conceptual framework to guide their implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review on supply chain management (SCM) and logistics was conducted to integrate the existing knowledge of SCM, key business processes, and logistics; the latter is critical element for the success of SCM. A set of logistics activities and a conceptual framework are presented to guide their implementation in each of the key business process of the GSCF model. Three case studies were conducted in Brazilian food companies to verify the applicability of the proposed logistics activities, their characterization, and the conceptual framework.

Findings

The logistics activities, the key business processes, and the steps to their implementation are integrated into a comprehensive framework. A total of 24 logistics activities and a conceptual framework to guide their implementation for each key business process of the GSCF model were proposed focussing on competitive advantage in a supply chain environment.

Originality/value

The need for and the benefits derived from the involvement of the logistics in the key business processes of SCM have been reported in the literature, but the logistics activities in these processes and the way they were implemented have not yet been identified. According to Eisenhardt and Graebner (2007), building theory from case studies is an increasingly popular and relevant research strategy that involves using one or more cases to create theoretical constructs, propositions, and/or midrange theory from case-based empirical evidence. Therefore, the research gap to be filled with this manuscript is: “How does the involvement of the logistics area in the key business processes of the GSCF model occur?” The research question of the present study is: “Which activities are performed by the logistics area in the key business processes of the GSCF model and how to implement them?”. This study bridged the research gap and answered the research question by creating a theoretical construct through a conceptual framework to guide the implementation of the logistics activities for each key business process of the GSCF model. This paper aimed to extend the existing theory since the available literature has yet not addressed this research question at all.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-481-5

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Vojtěch Heřmanský, M. Bilinski, H. Binner, Joon Lee, Dave Lowrie and M. Whiteside

The members of the chapter at the annual meeting held on 27 November 1992 in Brno decided not to split after the separation of Czechoslovakia. It was suggested to organise…

Abstract

The members of the chapter at the annual meeting held on 27 November 1992 in Brno decided not to split after the separation of Czechoslovakia. It was suggested to organise a larger chapter from the Central European States to provide greater co‐operation and better functioning of the smaller chapters. A new name for the chapter was proposed — Central European Chapter (CEC) — to express neutrality and to point out that the chapter is open to other neighbouring chapters and to new members from the states where no national chapter yet exists.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Ana Maria Ramalho Correia and José Carlos Teixeira

This paper aims to provide an overview of some of the most recent developments in concepts and practices associated with information literacy worldwide, revealing the…

6641

Abstract

This paper aims to provide an overview of some of the most recent developments in concepts and practices associated with information literacy worldwide, revealing the paradox that, while information literacy is a key discipline of the information society and knowledge economy and is well‐understood in its broader sense, it has made little progress educationally, save for a few exceptions in countries such as Australia, the USA, Canada and the UK. Deriving from the authors' background as university professors, the paper concentrates on approaches to promote information literacy in higher education. The paper concludes by pointing to the need to expand the debate on information literacy and how to raise ethical and moral concerns in the use of the Internet and the new technologies. It also explores the potential role that the European Commission eSafe (2003‐2004) programme can play to encourage research and practice on information literacy in its widest sense, as an intrinsic competency in the fight against the effects of disseminating illegal and harmful content through online and other new technologies.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Lynn M. Hemmer, Jean Madsen and Mario S. Torres

The expansion of alternative education, globally, has coincided with a shift towards greater accountability for ensuring educational access and opportunity, high academic…

1512

Abstract

Purpose

The expansion of alternative education, globally, has coincided with a shift towards greater accountability for ensuring educational access and opportunity, high academic standards and increased graduation rates. While studies suggest the pervasive influence of accountability may be redefining how school leaders provide meaningful learning experiences and facilitating high achievement, little is known about school leaders of alternative schools administering accountability polices. If there are inconsistencies between meaningful learning experiences for at‐risk students and performance‐based standards outcomes, this may suggest issues around equity and alternative schools that should be evaluated. Using a theoretical frame of policy implementation, specifically the authoritative design of policy and social constructs of compliance, this study aims to examine how alternative school leaders implement accountability policies.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross‐case study employs a qualitative thematic strategy of data analysis in conjunction with Fairclough's three‐dimensional framework of discourse analysis to examine how seven school leaders at five alternative schools in California and Texas interpret and administer accountability policy.

Findings

The theme of reconciliation: tension between compliance and innovation was revealed from the data. The discourses surrounding the nature of students at risk and policy compliance converged, creating a notion that alternative school leaders were losing their autonomy as knowing what is best for their students amidst increasing accountability standards.

Research limitations/implications

While many of the administrators are positioned by their districts to act as an at‐risk student expert when designing or sustaining academic and social programs at their respective alternative schools, they are in the process of losing some of their autonomy because of the pressures derived from accountability standards. However, school leaders continue to take responsive and reflexive actions to create distance between their settings and accountability policy in order to protect their students and schools from external pressures.

Originality/value

The study presents original findings in the area of accountability policy implementation in alternative school settings. This work suggests that the social constructs of compliance and student risk factors converge with the authoritative nature of accountability policy. In turn, tension was created for alternative school leaders as they consider what is best for at‐risk students.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

George K. Stylios

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects…

3114

Abstract

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2018

Maria Odette Lobato-Calleros, Karla Fabila, Pamela Shaw and Brian Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to design and test a user satisfaction model to evaluate the contribution of biodiesel production and consumption to the sustainability of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to design and test a user satisfaction model to evaluate the contribution of biodiesel production and consumption to the sustainability of a semi-urban community in the Cowichan Valley in British Columbia Canada. This case study is part of a larger research study whose purpose is to create a model for an index of sustainable community production and consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical approach selected was the national indices of consumer satisfaction models. The methodology was qualitative and quantitative, in-depth interviews were used to learn the opinion of active and non-active consumers of biodiesel. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed with specialized software for qualitative studies. A structural equation model, whose innovation is the inclusion of the sustainability variables, was designed and analyzed with statistical technique partial least squares.

Findings

The designed model and methodology were useful to identify the principal cause variables of consumer satisfaction of biodiesel in two types of users: active users and non-active users. The determination coefficient R2 of the latent variables satisfaction and loyalty for the prediction of biodiesel active users model is 0.82 and 0.72, respectively, while the result for the non-active users model is 0.90 for satisfaction and 0.73 for loyalty. Sustainable consumption at community level is statistically significant as a direct cause of the variable sustainability of the community for both models, and in turn the sustainability of the community variable has a significant impact on loyalty for the active users model.

Originality/value

This case study is part of a larger research study whose purpose is to create a model for an index of sustainable community production and consumption which will be measured longitudinally to detect changes in the sustainable consumption of the community members.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Anna-Mária Fall and Bonnie S. Billingsley

We used teacher data from the Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE) to compare the credentials, preservice preparation, self-efficacy, and induction of…

Abstract

We used teacher data from the Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE) to compare the credentials, preservice preparation, self-efficacy, and induction of early career special educators in high- and low-poverty schools using a framework adapted from Carlson, Lee, and Schroll (2004). We found significant differences in the credentials and preparation of teachers working in high poverty versus more affluent districts, with those in high-poverty schools having fewer credentials and less preparation. In contrast, the two teacher groups reported similar induction opportunities and gave themselves comparable ratings on both self-efficacy and in skillfulness in various work tasks. Our findings dramatize the critical need to recruit and prepare qualified teachers for high-poverty schools.

Details

Personnel Preparation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-59749-274-4

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Cleiton Frigo, Ederlan Magri, Julierme Zimmer Barbosa, Laudete Maria Sarteretto, Eloá Moura Araujo, Vander Freitas de Melo, Stephen Arthur Prior and Antônio Carlos Vargas Motta

Vehicular road traffic may represent an important soil and plant contamination source. In this context, the concentration of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, As, Sb, Ni, Cu, Fe, Al…

Abstract

Purpose

Vehicular road traffic may represent an important soil and plant contamination source. In this context, the concentration of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, As, Sb, Ni, Cu, Fe, Al, Mn and Zn) and macronutrients (Ca, Mg, K and P) was evaluated in yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.) cultivations and in soils adjacent to highways.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigated yerba mate cultivations were located in southern Brazil. Plant tissue (young and old leaves and branches) and soil (0–10 cm) samples were collected at five distances from the highway (0–10, 10–20, 20–30, 30–40 and 40–50 m). Plant tissue was analyzed with and without washing to evaluate contributions from particulate deposition.

Findings

Although increases in soil pseudo-total concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn, Ca and Mg were observed only at the Erechim site, geoaccumulation indices and enrichment factors (EFs) did not indicate any heavy metal pollution. These results indicate the existence of natural variation in soil. Cadmium was more concentrated in branches than in leaves, while the opposite was observed for Pb. High levels of Mn and Al were found in foliar tissue. In summary, highway proximity did not lead to heavy metal contamination of yerba mate under the evaluated conditions.

Originality/value

This research explores the possibility of heavy metal pollution in plantations of yerba mate adjacent to highways and indicates natural concentrations of toxic elements that exceed current legislation, which was an important discovery regarding the yerba mate production chain.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

1 – 10 of 36