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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2018

Claudia Fernández-Pacheco Theurer, Jose Luis López Ruiz and María C. Latorre

The purpose of this paper is to review the economic studies on Brexit, highlighting that they have focused mainly on its negative impact on trade. The economic intuition…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the economic studies on Brexit, highlighting that they have focused mainly on its negative impact on trade. The economic intuition behind these outcomes is provided, explaining why they are asymmetric with the UK being much more harmed than EU-27.

Design/methodology/approach

The importance of foreign multinationals in the UK and of UK’s multinationals abroad is shown using a non-standard quantification, which may be preferable than conventional methodologies. In addition, EU trade and investment legislative regimes are explained. Particular attention is paid to the change after the 2009 Lisbon Treaty which transfers foreign investment to the exclusive competence of the EU as opposed to EU states.

Findings

The data show that EU-27 is a much less important investment than trade partner for UK.

Originality/value

Although modelling the economy-wide impact of multinationals is challenging, the data and EU legislative framework analyzed suggest it is very much worthwhile. Other considerations about UK’s diminished leveraging power to negotiate after its EU’s withdrawal are also considered.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Gabriela Ortiz Valverde and Maria C. Latorre

The purpose of this paper is as follows: first, it aims to explain the overall economic implications of the trans-pacific partnership (TPP). Second, it aims to provide an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is as follows: first, it aims to explain the overall economic implications of the trans-pacific partnership (TPP). Second, it aims to provide an in-depth analysis of the TPP’s quantitative impact on an upper-middle economy such as Mexico, as well as on the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is performed using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model.

Findings

The results suggest that in the short run, both Mexico and the USA would slightly benefit from the TPP. Tariff reductions would lead to less bilateral trade between Mexico and the USA and the stronger integration of both countries with the rest of the TPP members. The opposite is true after a decrease in non-tariff barriers (NTBs). Overall, in terms of the impact on Mexico, trade integration with the rest of the TPP members prevails. This suggests that a TPP without the USA could still be beneficial.

Originality/value

Previous studies on the TPP have mainly focused on its impact for the USA, which is also analysed in the present study. The effects of the TPP are estimated for a broad set of micro and macroeconomic variables, paying particular attention to the reductions of NTBs.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 12 no. 4/5/6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Mónica del Carmen Meza-Mejía, Claudia María García-Casas, Claudia Fabiola Ortega-Barba and Sara Elvira Galbán-Lozano

This qualitative research articulates the perspective that educational institution directors have on the meaning of management action and the need for training in this…

Abstract

This qualitative research articulates the perspective that educational institution directors have on the meaning of management action and the need for training in this area. Significant research findings include the importance of training in three specific aspects: technical knowledge, virtues, and managerial competencies. Study participants emphasized that experience alone is insufficient to run a school, which is an important job not only for educating students, but also for the impact it has on the entire educational community (i.e., managers, administrative and service staff, teachers, and parents).

Details

Strategy, Power and CSR: Practices and Challenges in Organizational Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-973-6

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Bartira Mendes Gorgulho, Agatha Nogueira Previdelli and Dirce Maria Lobo Marchioni

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of an intervention to reduce the energy density of meals in the workplace food environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of an intervention to reduce the energy density of meals in the workplace food environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted on a cosmetics manufacturer that employed 243 people, and was divided into three phases: diagnostic evaluation; development and testing of modifications to the energy density of the preparations; and evaluation of the results obtained. To evaluate the menus, the Meal Quality Index was used. This index consists of five components ranging from 0 to 20 points: “Adequacy of availability of vegetable and fruit”, “Carbohydrate availability”, “Total fat availability”, “Saturated fat availability” and “Menu variability”. The Kruskal‐Wallis test was used to evaluate differences in phases 1 and 3.

Findings

The classification, according to the scores for the Meal Quality Index, showed that there was an improvement in the menus, with a decrease in inadequate menus from 31 per cent to 5 per cent and in menus needing improvement from 44 per cent to 29 per cent.

Originality/value

Changes that are relatively simple to implement and reproduce regarding meal production may contribute towards controlling the obesity epidemic, through discouraging the obesogenic environment, especially among captive healthy customers such as workers who use the food services in their workplaces.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Maria Gribling and Joanne Duberley

The purpose of this article is to compare the effects of global competitive pressures on the UK and French B-schools' management systems through the lens of career ecosystems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to compare the effects of global competitive pressures on the UK and French B-schools' management systems through the lens of career ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative inquiry employing in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 44 business school academics in the two countries.

Findings

This paper demonstrates the importance of top-down and bottom-up ecosystem influences for creating contrasting performance management systems in competitive B-schools in the two countries, to different outcomes for institutions and faculty careers.

Research limitations/implications

The authors focus on faculty working in top business schools, which limits the generalizability of the findings. Future research could apply the ecosystem lens to other institutions and geographical areas to highlight best practices and evaluate their transferability across borders.

Practical implications

The study highlights alternative HR practices and potentially workable adjustments to current systems that could be envisaged in order to enhance performance of individuals and institutions without jeopardizing the chances of valuable human resources to bring their contributions to the success of B-schools.

Originality/value

This paper compares and contrasts different performance management systems, taking into account exogenous and endogenous influences on B-schools that operate in a highly competitive and rapidly changing global management education market.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Susana Torío-López, José Vicente Peña-Calvo, Mercedes Inda-Caro, Carmen María Fernández-García and Carmen Rodríguez Menéndez

The purpose of the Building Everyday Life programme is to improve parenting outcomes through better sharing of family responsibilities and to encourage a strong sense of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the Building Everyday Life programme is to improve parenting outcomes through better sharing of family responsibilities and to encourage a strong sense of solidarity and community.

Design/methodology/approach

Data have been obtained from the pre-test and post-test applications, respectively, using two instruments: the Inventory of Parenting and Family Life Patterns and Resources, and the Final Evaluation Questionnaire for parents. The authors also use these tools to evaluate the degree to which the changes are maintained six months after the completion of the programme. Participants in the study comprised a group of 35 individuals that included parents in nuclear families and single mothers. The assessment process involved three stages: a pre-test assessment, a qualitative report (summative assessment) and, finally, a post-test assessment at least six months after completion of the programme.

Findings

The results show lasting changes over time. Regarding domestic work, parents say that they are more aware of the need to achieve a fairer and more equal distribution of the tasks in question. Families also report that they have perceived changes in the dimensions of communication and conflict resolution. Bearing in mind the limited nature of the aforementioned changes, the results suggest the need for support processes over time, as well as the establishment of follow-up sessions with families.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the study is to show that the Building Everyday Life programme is effective and valuable in improving parental educational styles.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Juliana Maria Magalhães Christino, Erico Aurelio Abreu Cardozo, Thaís Santos Silva and Caroline Mazzini

This study aims to understand the extent to which packaging influences Brazilian parents' purchasing willingness based on children's food preferences for unhealthy food products.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the extent to which packaging influences Brazilian parents' purchasing willingness based on children's food preferences for unhealthy food products.

Design/methodology/approach

Parents, with children up to 12 years old, answered questions about the positive influence of the packaging on the children, the preferences of the children in their willingness to buy and the propensity to give in to the desires of the children. Data analysis was performed with the statistical software SPSS and Stata used for structural equations modeling.

Findings

The results back the outlined hypotheses and point out that the characteristics of the packaging positively influence children's preferences as well as parents’ who are prone to give in to such influences. In some relationships, there was a minute moderating effect of social desirability and social class.

Research limitations/implications

The research presents as a limitation the nature of the sample, parents, to the extent that the influences of the packages on the children were analyzed from their perspectives.

Practical implications

Findings from the research can be used to think about preventive public policies to protect children as highly vulnerable subjects. Another practical implication is that the same marketing strategies that are used for unhealthy foods can also be used for healthy foods, improving their linkage to the children once there are evidences that packaging can positively influence their preferences.

Originality/value

The originality of this study is to focus on children's food preferences for unhealthy products and in parents with children up to 12 years old, which is not often investigated by researchers.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Maria Teresa Cuomo, Alice Mazzucchelli, Roberto Chierici and Francesca Ceruti

Taking jointly into account social commerce and online brand community, this paper aims to investigate how the growth of social commerce and the fast adoption of online…

Abstract

Purpose

Taking jointly into account social commerce and online brand community, this paper aims to investigate how the growth of social commerce and the fast adoption of online brand communities have given firms the opportunity to establish a new kind of community, namely, the social commerce brand community. Adopting a managerial perspective, the research aims to identify the core dimensions of social commerce brand community and shed light on how they contribute in engaging customers and transform them into brand advocates.

Design/methodology/approach

Five social commerce retailers operating into five different sectors of activity have been involved in a multiple case study. Data retrieved from semi-structured interviews have been triangulated with information gathered from different sources to provide depth to the cases and enhance data validity.

Findings

This study substantiates the rise of social commerce brand community as a new phenomenon that differs from traditional online brand communities and provides firms with concrete support in selling activities and in managing relationships with customers. The multiple case study allows also to detect social commerce brand community core pillars, namely, participants’ identification, participation, conversation and social support. These four elements turned out to be crucial to develop an effective social commerce brand community.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends existing theory on social commerce and online brand community by investigating the social commerce brand community as a new phenomenon and clarifying the fundamental pillars on which it relies.

Originality/value

This study extends existing theory on social commerce and online brand community by investigating the social commerce brand community as a new phenomenon and clarifying the fundamental pillars on which it relies.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Ana Belén Jiménez Muñoz, Antonio Muiño Miguez, María Paz Rodriguez Pérez, María Esther Durán Garcia and María Sanjurjo Saez

Medication errors (MEs) are important in terms of their magnitude and severity, and there are numerous systems in place to reduce their occurrence. However, the ideal…

Abstract

Purpose

Medication errors (MEs) are important in terms of their magnitude and severity, and there are numerous systems in place to reduce their occurrence. However, the ideal system has not yet been identified. The authors' institution uses three different medication prescription‐dispensation systems which operate simultaneously. ME rates were compared, overall and by phase (prescription, transcription and administration) and their overall and specific clinical impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The administration of medicinal products was observed directly and compared with medical and nursing prescriptions. Errors and adverse events were classified by a consensus of experts.

Findings

In the traditional system the error prevalence rate was 13.59 per cent, (99 per cent CI, 12.15‐14.61 per cent), in the single dose system it was 6.43 per cent (99 per cent CI, 5.53‐7.32) and in the electronic prescription system it was 8.86 per cent (99 per cent CI, 7.33‐10.17). The highest error rates in all phases were found in the traditional system. The phase affected by most errors in all three models was transcription, and the least affected was administration, except for the single dose system, in which prescription was the worst. The effects of errors in the administration phase are greater, although less so than with the automated system.

Research limitations/implications

The dispensation phase was not analyzed.

Practical implications

A study of errors will enable us to reduce their occurrence if we know the most frequent types and in which phase they are produced, we will be able to prioritise the areas in which to work and select the necessary preventive measures.

Originality/value

It is possible that automated medication dispensation systems reduce error rates and the severity of their effects.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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