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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Marguerite Evans

The essays by Sauer and Cassidy have argued that significant questions can be raised philosophically and historically about the guiding assumptions of economic behaviour…

Abstract

The essays by Sauer and Cassidy have argued that significant questions can be raised philosophically and historically about the guiding assumptions of economic behaviour. One can also argue that these assumptions offer a partial view of human being with an accompanying loss of the sense of the whole person. Economics tends to reduce the multiform and rich notion of person to simply a datum of economic activity. In this essay, I will argue that there is a need to re‐examine basic assumptions about what it means to be fully human. I will do this from the perspective of developmental psychology, because developmental psychology has empirically based theories that produce expectations about humanity and the future that are very different from those ascribed by economics. This essay will examine developmental theory, particularly that of Robert Kegan, to show its relevance to providing a direction for economics.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

The critical dimension and the one that can unify knowledge through systemic interrelationships, is unification of the purely a priori with the purely a posteriori parts…

Abstract

The critical dimension and the one that can unify knowledge through systemic interrelationships, is unification of the purely a priori with the purely a posteriori parts of total reality into a congruous whole. This is a circular cause and effect interrelationship between premises. The emerging kind of world view may also be substantively called the epistemic‐ontic circular causation and continuity model of unified reality. The essence of this order is to ground philosophy of science in both the natural and social sciences, in a perpetually interactive and integrative mould of deriving, evolving and enhancing or revising change. Knowledge is then defined as the output of every such interaction. Interaction arises first from purely epistemological roots to form ontological reality. This is the passage from the a priori to the a posteriori realms in the traditions of Kant and Heidegger. Conversely, the passage from the a posteriori to a priori reality is the approach to knowledge in the natural sciences proferred by Cartesian meditations, David Hume, A.N. Whitehead and Bertrand Russell, as examples. Yet the continuity and renewal of knowledge by interaction and integration of these two premises are not rooted in the philosophy of western science. Husserl tried for it through his critique of western civilization and philosophical methods in the Crisis of Western Civilization. The unified field theory of Relativity‐Quantum physics is being tried for. A theory of everything has been imagined. Yet after all is done, scientific research program remains in a limbo. Unification of knowledge appears to be methodologically impossible in occidental philosophy of science.

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Humanomics, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Catherine Hodgens, Marguerite C. Sendall and Lynn Evans

The purpose of this paper is to examine post‐graduate health promotion students' self‐perceptions of information literacy skills prior to, and after completing PILOT, an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine post‐graduate health promotion students' self‐perceptions of information literacy skills prior to, and after completing PILOT, an online information literacy tutorial.

Design/methodology/approach

Post‐graduate students at Queensland University of Technology enrolled in PUP038 New Developments in Health Promotion completed a pre‐ and post‐self‐assessment questionnaire. From 2008‐2011 students were required to rate their academic writing and research skills before and after completing the PILOT online information literacy tutorial. Quantitative trends and qualitative themes were analysed to establish students' self‐assessment and the effectiveness of the PILOT tutorial.

Findings

The results from four years of post‐graduate students' self‐assessment questionnaires provide evidence of perceived improvements in information literacy skills after completing PILOT. Some students continued to have trouble with locating quality information and analysis as well as issues surrounding referencing and plagiarism. Feedback was generally positive and students' responses indicated they found the tutorial highly beneficial in improving their research skills.

Originality/value

This paper is original because it describes post‐graduate health promotion students' self‐assessment of information literacy skills over a period of four years. The literature is limited in the health promotion domain and self‐assessment of post‐graduate students' information literacy skills.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Dorothy Wu Nelson, Marguerite M. Moore and Kristen K. Swanson

The purpose of this paper is to add to the literature concerning potential motivations that drive social networking sites (SNS) for fashion-related behaviors among…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add to the literature concerning potential motivations that drive social networking sites (SNS) for fashion-related behaviors among millennial consumers using a Uses and Gratifications (U&G) perspective. Four SNS platforms – Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter – were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The study presents a mixed-methods approach to develop and test a motivations framework among millennial consumers that will lead to practical understanding of both the existence of and impact of different motivations for engaging in SNS.

Findings

Unique motivations appear to drive use of the four examined platforms. Results indicate that a broad set of common motivations for SNS use among millennial consumers who exhibit an interest in fashion can be determined. Further, the results indicate significant differences among motivations within the respective platform types. Lastly, the results reveal common factors among three or more SNS platforms: “Fashion,” “Connection,” “Following” and “Pictures.” The ‘Entertainment’ factor was common among two SNS platforms.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study are the limited sample and SNS selection. A broader representation of the millennial consumer behaviors would provide a more comprehensive picture of the motivations for using SNS platforms.

Practical implications

The study provides useful information for fashion marketers and researchers who can benefit from an updated understanding of SNS behaviors.

Originality/value

The study provides a relevant contribution to SNS research as well as understanding of millennial consumers. Additionally, it adds contribution to the U&G theory concerning new media platforms. It also delivers a replicable research design for other SNS platforms.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Eleanor Mitchell and Sarah Barbara Watstein

Abstract

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1950

1950, the centenary year of public libraries, now with us, must be a year of intense interest to all who read THE LIBRARY WORLD. Preparations have been made by the Library…

Abstract

1950, the centenary year of public libraries, now with us, must be a year of intense interest to all who read THE LIBRARY WORLD. Preparations have been made by the Library Association on very generous lines for its celebration. We have our Royal Charter, and now we have the privilege of the Consort of the Heir to the Throne as our President. What is more, H.M. the King has become our Patron. Who shall think meanly of librarians and their work hereafter? No longer, too, shall librarians think meanly of themselves. The writer of this month's Letters on Our Affairs, with some of which we may not entirely agree, is surely right in his assertion that the profession “is arriving.”

Details

New Library World, vol. 52 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Tom Schultheiss, Lorraine Hartline, Jean Mandeberg, Pam Petrich and Sue Stern

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1949

While some libraries have done their best over the years to inform the public as to what they are doing and can do as regards helping readers, others seem to move along…

Abstract

While some libraries have done their best over the years to inform the public as to what they are doing and can do as regards helping readers, others seem to move along without making any special effort to publicise their facilities. In the old days modesty was a virtue, but now it is its own reward. Government departments, which used to shun the limelight, now employ public relations officers in large numbers, and professional bodies and big business houses constantly seek publicity. Times have changed, and the battle is to the strong; and it is unfortunately generally felt that the institution or service that does not speak for itself has little to speak about. It may frankly be said that if a service is in a position to enlarge its sphere of influence and esteem it should do so to the utmost of its endeavour. But it will be granted that if its publicity is not justified by performance, there will likely be an unhappy reaction.

Details

Library Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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