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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Margie Jantti

The purpose of this case study is to provide an overview of the evolution of performance measurement at the University of Wollongong (UOW) Library. Through iterative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to provide an overview of the evolution of performance measurement at the University of Wollongong (UOW) Library. Through iterative review, a framework was sought that would enable it to: demonstrate value and impact; better assess the demand and uptake of services and to evaluate relevance; improve the capture and reporting of continuous improvement initiatives; create a new narrative for communicating its role and unique contribution to UOW’s strategic agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

Since 1996, the Performance Indicator Framework (PIF) has been used to monitor and drive improvement, and to acquire evidence and milestones of success. As the issues of value and impact emerged in both in assessment theory and practice, it was timely to critically reassess the capability of the PIF and to optimise its alignment to the Library’s new structure and strategic focus.

Findings

Initial observations revealed an improved: confidence and independence in team leaders and managers using the PIF and communicating results and outcomes; ability to illustrate the interdependencies of processes, activities and projects; narrative for performance reporting.

Practical implications

UOW Library acknowledges limitations in its competency to establish hard, rigorously tested measures for the indicator “impact”. A key outcome sought from the review was the formation of a new mind-set; to think differently about performance and outcomes. The Library was prepared to accept on a pragmatic level, the identification of proxy measures that could support in some way the narrative and habits that were sought in considering performance data and outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to challenge how libraries consider their effectiveness and their value and impact.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Margie Jantti and Jennifer Heath

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the development of an institution wide approach to learning analytics at the University of Wollongong (UOW) and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the development of an institution wide approach to learning analytics at the University of Wollongong (UOW) and the inclusion of library data drawn from the Library Cube.

Design/methodology/approach

The Student Support and Education Analytics team at UOW is tasked with creating policy, frameworks and infrastructure for the systematic capture, mapping and analysis of data from the across the university. The initial data set includes: log file data from Moodle sites, Library Cube, student administration data, tutorials and student support service usage data. Using the learning analytics data warehouse UOW is developing new models for analysis and visualisation with a focus on the provision of near real-time data to academic staff and students to optimise learning opportunities.

Findings

The distinct advantage of the learning analytics model is that the selected data sets are updated weekly, enabling near real-time monitoring and intervention where required. Inclusion of library data with the other often disparate data sets from across the university has enabled development of a comprehensive platform for learning analytics. Future work will include the development of predictive models using the rapidly growing learning analytics data warehouse.

Practical implications

Data warehousing infrastructure, the systematic capture and exporting of relevant library data sets are requisite for the consideration of library data in learning analytics.

Originality/value

What was not anticipated five years ago when the Value Cube was first realised, was the development of learning analytic services at UOW. The Cube afforded University of Wollongong Library considerable advantage: the framework for data harvesting and analysis was established, ready for inclusion within learning analytics data sets and subsequent reporting to faculty.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Margie Jantti and Nick Greenhalgh

The purpose of this paper is to establish a transparent, integrated approach to leadership competency development and succession management to respond to drivers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a transparent, integrated approach to leadership competency development and succession management to respond to drivers associated with an ageing workforce, leadership drain and the enticement of people into leadership roles.

Design/methodology/approach

A consultant was engaged to facilitate a review of the UOW Library's leadership situation. Key to this process and subsequent activities was the use of the Lominger Leadership competencies; measurable characteristics related to success in the workplace to establish the desired leadership profile. Career interviews, professional coaching and targeted assignments were integral to the development of needed competencies.

Findings

The paper finds that feedback from peers, managers and staff was a significant component of the evaluation strategy. Formal assessment took place through the use of the Lominger's VOICES® 360‐degree feedback instrument, an institutional employee climate survey and recertification against the Investors in People standard. Results showed improved self‐confidence in leaders, a greater preparedness to address underperformance, and that career and developmental plans were more considered and constructive in their design. Significant improvement in leadership performance was noted in a later employee climate survey.

Practical implications

A commitment by the executive or senior leadership team is critical to this type of developmental program. Considerable energy and time is required from all parties involved, e.g. scheduling time for workshops, coaching sessions, subsequent actions and review; challenging in an environment of ever‐increasing priorities. Challenging also is the management of perceptions and expectations of staff. There was some disaffection from staff who were not included in the first round of coaching. Subsequently, opportunities to support both external and internal coaching are being investigated.

Originality/value

A commitment to new methods to support and evaluate leadership development initiatives resulted in changed perceptions of leadership aspiration, aptitude and ability. The identification of required competencies provided improved goal clarity, insight on how to become skilled in a given competency, and a reference point for evaluation. Importantly the performance of leaders has improved. There is qualitative and quantitative data to demonstrate both a commitment to leadership development and the application of desired behaviours associated with the competencies. The capacity to grow and promote from within has also improved; evidence that the succession management initiative is being achieved.

Details

Library Management, vol. 33 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2004

Felicity McGregor

The proliferation of inspirational leadership and management publications available in libraries and bookshops suggests that there are many paths to excellence. Much of…

Abstract

The proliferation of inspirational leadership and management publications available in libraries and bookshops suggests that there are many paths to excellence. Much of the literature is written with a business or corporate audience in mind; however, it is a source of ideas, theories and models that, potentially, can be applied in public or not-for-profit organisations. One theory which has enjoyed a long history of debate and discussion in management studies is quality management, variously referred to as TQM, quality assurance, total quality control or one of the many other alternatives. In this chapter the applicability and potential benefits, as well as the challenges and obstacles, of adopting one version of total quality management in a library setting are examined.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-005-0

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