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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Craig Hume and Margee Hume

The aim of this paper is to research the practice of knowledge management (KM) in not-for-profit (NFP), small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to identify gaps in the current…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to research the practice of knowledge management (KM) in not-for-profit (NFP), small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to identify gaps in the current body of knowledge. Previous work has been conducted in small, medium and large enterprises; however, NFP SMEs have been underexamined. Given the prevalence of NFP, SMEs’ further research is warranted.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study methodology, this research advances previous KM work (Hume and Hume, 2008). Based on previous work in SMEs, KM and the application to NFP organizations, this work offers a set of propositions related to strategic development of KM in NFP organizations with multiple data sources across hierarchical levels sought and analyzed within each of the case studies. This process provided data variation. Collection continued until theoretical saturation was achieved. The paper supports analysis with the use of Leximancer 3.0 and offers a unique approach to qualitative research using textual and narrative analysis.

Findings

This paper explores the definition of knowledge, the importance of knowledge planning, capture and diffusion and offers development in NFP SMEs. The paper concludes by introducing the link between KM and internal marketing to address the importance of cultural and social issues of “me” which are central to knowledge capture, renewal and sustainable KM in NFP organizations. The paper introduces socialization strategies and informal knowledge capture specific to the transient, volunteer and permanent employee mix in NFP organizations and introduces the notion of understanding the significance of social mission to employees and volunteers in the embodiment of KM.

Research limitations/implications

This study has aimed to access all empirical articles in the field of KM in SMEs. To ensure the consideration of the advancement in wireless, mobile computing technology and smartphones as KM support, articles from 2005 onwards were primarily sought. This search restriction has limited the role of earlier works in the research. It is arguable that the sample cases may not offer a comprehensive coverage of all NFP firms, with the qualitative approach further limiting the generalization of the findings.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, KM has been applied specifically in very few NFP SME firms, with scant exploration of the constructs of socialization, social mission and informal knowledge structure in NFP considered or previously published in academic journals.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Margee Hume and Gillian Sullivan Mort

Organizations must base success on consumer retention predicated on the consumer's desire to repurchase. Some organizations, such as those providing emotionally charged…

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10564

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations must base success on consumer retention predicated on the consumer's desire to repurchase. Some organizations, such as those providing emotionally charged and complex services in the performing arts, find this difficult. Knowledge of the role of emotions in customer judgments is negligible. The relationship of core service quality and peripheral quality on repurchase intent is also understudied. This paper aims to model and test the interrelationship of these constructs in predicting repurchase intention in a performing arts context.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument tailored to the performing arts was administered to a sample of 250 past and present performing arts audience members, with responses examined using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicate repurchase intention is largely based on satisfaction mediated by perceived value. Core service quality, appraisal emotion and peripheral service quality influence perceived value for time and money, with core service quality and peripheral service quality in turn influencing appraisal emotion. Appraisal emotion directly affects customer satisfaction but has no direct relationship to repurchase intention. Peripheral service quality, however, directly affects repurchase intention.

Practical implications

Evidence suggests expansion of the strategic focus to include peripheral services in order to maximize repurchase. Core service quality, (the act) affects repurchase intent through an indirect path mediated by appraisal emotion, which does not directly influence repurchase intent. Appraisal emotions are influential in determining perceived value.

Originality/value

This is the first known paper combining this system of relationships including the influence and role of appraisal emotion in the performing arts context.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2013

Margee Hume, Paul Johnston, Mark Argar and Craig Hume

Purpose – This chapter develops the case for a global Greenscape. It introduces the green global marketplace (Greenscape) to better understand the global green…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter develops the case for a global Greenscape. It introduces the green global marketplace (Greenscape) to better understand the global green market.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter introduces current green market practices and adopts case study methodology to present three distinct green cases related to renewable energy, process technology and wastewater recycling and their international market activities. The chapter offers discussion on findings and incorporates the novel technique of discourse analysis using Leximancer 3.0.Findings – The case shows how the Greendex Report (2012) positions Brazil, India, China and Russia at the top of the markets for green product penetration. The developed nations of USA, France and Canada make up the bottom rankings. The chapter finds essential elements for creating the global Greenscape and marketing of green technologies.Research limitations/implications (if applicable) – Empirical research testing success pathways and destination opportunities is desirable.Practical implications (if applicable) – The ‘success and failure criteria’ identify how planning, patent and partnerships are essential for successful entry. Specific market research on G(reen) markets, market information, marketing functions for market entry and market diffusion for renewable products and process technologies such as supply chain elements, and how these interrelate with achieving sustainability goals is essential for successful entry.Originality/value of chapter – The chapter offers a novel and original approach to international green market penetration and offers analysis related to the new world BRIC countries that have been little explored.

Details

International Business, Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-625-5

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Margee Hume

This research models the interrelationship of service quality (SQ) for core and peripheral service, perceived value and satisfaction to establish a system of relationship…

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5539

Abstract

Purpose

This research models the interrelationship of service quality (SQ) for core and peripheral service, perceived value and satisfaction to establish a system of relationship that predicts repurchase intention (RI) in a performing arts context. Business researchers in services understand that organizations must base success on consumer retention. With increased competition and dwindling funding, the performing arts have more constraints in managing and designing customer retention programs. Knowledge of the predictors of customer judgments in re‐purchase intention is undeveloped in the performing arts sector positioning both academic and practical research as warranted. This paper aims to fill this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument customized to the performing arts was administered to a sample of 273 past and present performing arts audience members and examined using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicate that customers determine their re‐purchase intention based on both core and peripheral SQ, mediated by perceived value and customer satisfaction. There was no direct or significant relationships found for SQ of core and peripheral services and perceived value to RI.

Practical implications

This work supports the need for strategic consideration of both peripheral service aspects and core show quality in service design and delivery in order to maximize perceived value, satisfaction and repurchase intent. Findings suggest a balanced approach to the “act” (core) and the activities required to take it to the market (peripheral) is required.

Originality/value

This is the first known paper presenting this system of relationships and the first to test this system of relationships in the performing arts context.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Hoda McClymont, Jeff Gow, Margee Hume and Chad Perry

The authors seek to better understand the critical incidents and factors that influence the switching behaviours of back pain sufferers who use mainstream and/or…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors seek to better understand the critical incidents and factors that influence the switching behaviours of back pain sufferers who use mainstream and/or complementary and alternative medicine (Edvardsson, 1998). That is, the purpose of this paper is to uncover how they switch between treatments and treatment providers; in particular, this research investigates two issues: the triggers of their switching and their switching paths, and how their emotions are involved in that switching. The contribution is the first empirical foundation for an understanding of these two issues in the context of back pain.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative technique of convergent interviewing was used. It involved conducting a series of long, initially rather unstructured interviews to converge on the important topic areas to the back pain sufferers and why they engage in their treatment behaviour.

Findings

This study investigated the triggers and categories of triggers that impact upon switching behaviours between bio-medical and CAT healthcare. Four main areas of findings were identified. First, although the literature identified four categories of triggers for switching, namely, situational, reactional, influential and personal characteristics, the findings of this research confirmed only two of these: reactional and situational triggers. The influential category of triggers was found to be more of a moderating factor between switching triggers and switching behaviours rather than a trigger factor on its own. Further, no evidence came to light that could confirm or disconfirm the roles of personal characteristics on switching behaviour and so this issue remains unresolved.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology used in this research was an exploratory one and so the findings must be used with caution. Further research, using a more quantitative methodology, is warranted to confirm the findings of this research. Also, this research focused on a subset of switching issues and so might not provide a holistic framework. Future investigations should therefore consider and clarify the role of emotion, time and voice in the switching model devised from this study.

Originality/value

This paper provides new evidence on the reasons for back pain sufferers consuming different treatment modes and the reasons for their switching and includes an exploratory investigation of the role of emotions in this decision making.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Gita Gayatri, Margee Hume and Gillian Sullivan Mort

The purpose of this paper is to explore service quality (SQ) from the perspective of the Muslim consumer. There is growing evidence that culture influences buying habits…

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2242

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore service quality (SQ) from the perspective of the Muslim consumer. There is growing evidence that culture influences buying habits and behaviours of consumers in services. However, most cross‐cultural consumer research in Asia has focused on the dimension of Chinese‐Confucian beliefs providing an opportunity to investigate other religious‐cultural aspects in Asia and consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This research explores the key attributes/factors of quality of services according to Muslim customers using the verbal protocol method followed by in‐depth probing interviews of 35 respondents. In depth, the interviews were conducted in Indonesia with a sample of Javanese‐Muslim customers of the airline, retail, hotel, and restaurant industries. Theoretical saturation was achieved with thick rich scripts obtained from respondents.

Findings

Preliminary analysis suggests some distinct outcomes positioning culture and religion as important constructs for consideration in SQ research.

Practical implications

The research provides important insights for service providers who target the Muslim consumer.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to examine SQ dimensions specific to Muslim consumers. It advances the SQ conceptualisations and SQ theory and offers attributes for consideration in future measurement.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Margee Hume and Gillian Sullivan Mort

The aim of this paper is to report on the structure and relationships between value and satisfaction in a cultural performing arts setting to identify the structure of…

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4038

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to report on the structure and relationships between value and satisfaction in a cultural performing arts setting to identify the structure of satisfaction in the performing arts context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines customer attitudes to value, show experience quality and peripheral service quality in a high arts setting by using a questionnaire. The pool of questions used the most recent scale measures for constructs in the area of services, in particular experiential services. The data are tested using AMOS 5.0 structural equation modelling.

Findings

This paper reports that value mediates the relationship of show experience quality and peripheral service quality to satisfaction and the direct link of these pathways to satisfaction was not significant. This research supports the notion that customers determine service satisfaction based on attribute performance of the show and peripheral service aspects, and derive value from this.

Practical implications

This research informs cultural organisation managers of the importance of delivering high levels of service quality and show experience in order to offer a value for money experience. This paper identifies the importance of understanding the heterogeneous and complex nature of customer‐derived value.

Originality/value

This paper examines a service sector that receives little attention. Cultural organisations operate as non‐profit organisations and are accountable for scarce fund allocation. Government support has decreased and corporate sponsorship is scarce and competitive. This paper offers assistance to organisations in the quest to balance the economic issues and constraints by creating value and satisfaction and balancing service quality and show delivery.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2013

Margee Hume and Michael Mills

Given an increasingly volatile and competitive fashion environment, the purpose of this paper is to qualitatively explore current consumer behaviour and psychological…

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13967

Abstract

Purpose

Given an increasingly volatile and competitive fashion environment, the purpose of this paper is to qualitatively explore current consumer behaviour and psychological perspectives of luxury in women's undergarment fashion purchasing, with specific examination of whether this under‐investigated area of discrete or inconspicuous fashion appraisal is consistent with other luxury purchases.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs an interesting methodological approach using multiple qualitative techniques including research interviews, group forums, and narrative capture, to investigate women's undergarment purchasing in a changing fashion environment in relation to the issues of branding, self‐image, perceived self‐image, motivational perspectives, and consumer behaviour, as identified by 119 female consumers aged between 18 and 60.

Findings

This study supports in part previous research that indicated consumer behaviour is determined by the congruency between the consumer's self‐image and the consumer's image of brands, although early research suggested this only applied to conspicuous products and social consumption. The current study confirms the self‐image link in the area of inconspicuous fashion, and strongly relates inconspicuous products consumed privately to self‐esteem and perceived sexy self.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that for intimate apparel marketing to be effective and credible, the marketed fashion items, and actions taken by designers, and retailers need to be consistent with the consumer's personal style, value perceptions, and self‐image.

Originality/value

This research examines several neglected areas in fashion and consumption research, and contributes to our understanding of key motivational elements important in the consumption of inconspicuous fashion, and the relationship of self‐image to inconspicuous consumption.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2013

Abstract

Details

International Business, Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-625-5

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2013

Frederick Ahen is a PhD candidate at the University of Turku, Finland. Frederick holds a BSc in Economics and International Business from the Università Politecnica delle…

Abstract

Frederick Ahen is a PhD candidate at the University of Turku, Finland. Frederick holds a BSc in Economics and International Business from the Università Politecnica delle Marche, Italy and an MSc in International Business from London South Bank University. Frederick's main research interests include strategic corporate responsibility, global sustainability and global health diplomacy with particular focus on the comparative institutional analysis of emerging economies in West, East, Central and Southern (WECS) Africa and selected European economies.

Details

International Business, Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-625-5

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