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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Margarida Fontes and Cristina Sousa

The purpose of this paper is to address the strategies adopted by science-based start-ups to gain access to knowledge resources at diverse spatial levels. It investigates…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the strategies adopted by science-based start-ups to gain access to knowledge resources at diverse spatial levels. It investigates the presence and relative importance of ties endowed with different types of proximity in firms’ knowledge networks, and the role played by non-geographical proximity in gaining access to knowledge sources, both nearby and distant.

Design/methodology/approach

An analytical framework is proposed that distinguishes between two dimensions of proximity – geographical and relational – leading to different forms of proximity, which are further linked with modes of knowledge interaction (formal or informal). A methodology for network reconstruction is developed and applied to Portuguese molecular biology firms, permitting to identify the origin, location and nature of the ties and to position them along forms of proximity.

Findings

The results show that the incidence and mix of the different forms of proximity vary in firms’ individual networks, being possible to identify several patterns. They also uncover the relevance of relational proximity, whether or not coexisting with geographical proximity and often compensating for its absence.

Research limitations/implications

This approach needs to be complemented with further research that refines the operationalization of relational proximity, by attempting to disentangle the influence of different types of non-geographical proximity. Further research will also explore in greater detail the factors that may explain variety in the proximity mix of firms’ networks.

Practical implications

The paper offers insights into the knowledge sourcing strategies adopted by science-based firms located outside the main concentrations of knowledge in their field.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on the role of proximity in knowledge access, by developing and empirically testing a taxonomy of forms of proximity, considering the characteristics of science-based firms. It uncovers the mechanisms through which relational proximity can contribute to span spatial boundaries, highlighting the role played by entrepreneurs’ personal networks.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Margarida Fontes and Rod Coombs

Based on an empirical study of Portuguese firms, addresses the creation of new technology‐based firms (NBTFs) in small, less developed countries. Assuming that…

Abstract

Based on an empirical study of Portuguese firms, addresses the creation of new technology‐based firms (NBTFs) in small, less developed countries. Assuming that technology‐related inputs ‐ at the level of supply and demand ‐ are predominant in NTBF creation, analyses the process through which the founders and other actors identify a technological opportunity and obtain the inputs ‐ technology, funds and market demand ‐ necessary to exploit it. Emphasizes the conditions surrounding the start‐up and early survival of these firms that differ significantly from those found in more advanced countries, uncovering the difficulties confronted by NBTF founders in a relatively unfavourable environment and describing their proactive responses. Concludes that NTBF formation in Portugal has been a learning process, through which the organizational innovation introduced by early pioneer founders, based on foreign role models, become better adjusted to Portuguese conditions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Margarida Jerónimo Barbosa, Pieter Pauwels, Victor Ferreira and Luís Mateus

Building information modeling (BIM) is most often used for the construction of new buildings. By using BIM in such projects, collaboration among stakeholders in an…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modeling (BIM) is most often used for the construction of new buildings. By using BIM in such projects, collaboration among stakeholders in an architecture, engineering and construction project is improved. To even further improve collaboration, there is a move toward the production and usage of BIM standards in various countries. These are typically national documents, including guides, protocols, and mandatory regulations, that introduce guidelines about what information should be exchanged at what time between which partners and in what formats. If a nation or a construction team agrees on these guidelines, improved collaboration can come about on top of the collaboration benefits induced by the mere usage of BIM. This scenario might also be targeted for interventions in existing buildings. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors investigate the general content and usage of existing BIM standards for new constructions, describing specifications about BIM deliverable documents, modeling, and collaboration procedures. The authors suggest to what extent the content in the BIM standards can also be used for interventions in existing buildings. These suggestions rely heavily on literature study, supported by on-site use case experiences.

Findings

From this research, the authors can conclude that the existing standards give a solid basis for BIM collaboration in existing building interventions, but that they need to be extended in order to be of better use in any intervention project in an existing building. This extension should happen at: data modeling level: other kinds of data formats need to be considered, coming from terrestrial laser scanning and automatic digital photogrammetry tools; at data exchange level: exchange requirements should take explicit statements about modeling tolerances and levels of (un)certainty; and at process modeling level: business process models should include information exchange processes from the very start of the building survey (BIM→facility management→BIM or regular audit).

Originality/value

BIM environments are not often used to document existing buildings or interventions in existing buildings. The authors propose to improve the situation by using BIM standards and/or guidelines, and the authors give an initial overview of components that should be included in such a standard and/or guideline.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

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