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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Peter Wells and Margarete Seitz

To delineate typologies that capture the relationship between closed‐loop supply chains and value‐added business models, and thereby to suggest a research agenda for the…

Abstract

Purpose

To delineate typologies that capture the relationship between closed‐loop supply chains and value‐added business models, and thereby to suggest a research agenda for the transition to sustainable business.

Design/methodology/approach

Develops four new theoretical categories or typologies of closed‐loop systems and applies them to the context of the automotive industry. Conceptual, rather than empirical.

Findings

That hybrid closed‐loop systems can be combined with innovative non‐linear value configurations to enable the transition to more sustainable production and consumption.

Research limitations/implications

Identifies research agenda to explore how novel business models can integrate with various closed‐loop systems. Theoretical, but grounded in research into the automotive industry.

Practical implications

That closed‐loop systems are best implemented outside traditional linear value added structures.

Originality/value

Places closed‐loop systems at the heart of the (redesigned) business model rather than as an accessory that must be adapted to the demands of existing approaches. Suggests scholars should be part of this innovative process, not merely observers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Margarete A. Seitz and Peter E. Wells

To provide in‐depth insights into one specific product recovery operation (remanufacturing) in the automotive sector, taking the example of original equipment manufacturers (OEM).

Abstract

Purpose

To provide in‐depth insights into one specific product recovery operation (remanufacturing) in the automotive sector, taking the example of original equipment manufacturers (OEM).

Design/methodology/approach

The research was undertaken within the engine remanufacturing facilities of a major European car manufacturer. The main data collection methods were open‐ended, non‐directive interviews and process observation. In addition, secondary data (internal company reports and documentation) were collected. Overall, a total of 64 interviews were conducted within the engine remanufacturing plant.

Findings

The case study revealed that the remanufacturing processes included challenges that have been traditionally investigated within “conventional” operations and supply chain management, such as high inventory levels or process through‐put times. It was also found that product take‐back and recovery in the automotive sector do not necessarily stem from a company's mission statement that includes (sustainable) responsibility, but are based on other motives. These motivations include the long‐term supply of spare parts, for example.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to one specific European car manufacturer and may therefore not necessarily apply to the independent automotive remanufacturing sector or to other OEM remanufacturers.

Practical implications

The case study gives an in‐depth insight into the issues within automotive product take‐back and recovery, the types of obstacles that may occur as well as how these may be overcome in the real world.

Originality/value

The findings provide new, real‐world insights for academia, but also feedback to industry by providing an in‐depth account of current automotive remanufacturing practices undertaken by the OEM.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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