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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Margaret Ryan

If participation is to be a reality, the institution of appropriate structures is not enough ‐ the social processes within these must also facilitate power sharing. In an…

Abstract

If participation is to be a reality, the institution of appropriate structures is not enough ‐ the social processes within these must also facilitate power sharing. In an international context, national cultures will have different effects on social process. The attitudes of managers towards aspects of decision making in their organizations, and their own behaviour, characterise the social process. Organizational characteristics concerning information sharing and manipulation, decision style, and the role of IT, and personal behaviour involving information control, flexibility, and role playing, are considered for their impact on particpative decision making. A comparison between French and British managers, drawn from an international study of decision making, illustrates the issue considered. While considerable similarities were found between the two cultural groups, differences of degree as well as opposed views were also found. Overall attitudes were fairly favourable to particpation, but limitations were found, and these differed between the two groups.

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Participation and Empowerment: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-4449

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Margaret Ryan

Explores the question of how specialist expertise is related to theorganizational decision‐making process. This relationship is seen as animportant issue in the…

Abstract

Explores the question of how specialist expertise is related to the organizational decision‐making process. This relationship is seen as an important issue in the integration of HRM with corporate strategy, and as having implications for HRM concerns with organizational and career structure, employee development, flexibility and culture. The relationship is seen as political in that it affects the extent to which technical experts are enabled to influence strategic decisions. It is also therefore of strategic significance in facilitating (or otherwise) the development and use of the knowledge base. Suggests that the HRM function needs to confront the challenges posed by expertise in the organization′s social process. The importance of identifying and developing the knowledge base across the technical as well as the social system is advocated as having an impact on competitive position. The discussion is illustrated with examples drawn from seven companies in which the relationship of scientific knowledge to the decision‐making process was being studied.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

John Kountz

The annual operating costs for traditional libraries can be shown to be greater than the cost to distributing a portable computer and related sources of electronic…

Abstract

The annual operating costs for traditional libraries can be shown to be greater than the cost to distributing a portable computer and related sources of electronic information to each library user in the academic environment. For public libraries, opportunity to reach the disadvantaged are inherent in this and other developments in the delivery of information. A time frame for the emergence of an information appliance—the tablet computer—capable of supporting the required information traffic, is presented and a model is developed to predict the migration of content from paper to electroform for each subject discipline. As one viable approach to library planning for the coming “new” information environment, the author suggests converting the “central library” into an “electronic information distribution center” that can support users regardless of physical location, while also incorporating automated storage and retrieval facilities to minimize warehousing costs for residual hard copy materials. The economical provision of information SERVICE is the objective; not greater staffs, collections of little used materials, and buildings.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1986

What strides have been made to increase the participation of women in the work force? Should we be concerned particularly about women's place in our industries and…

Abstract

What strides have been made to increase the participation of women in the work force? Should we be concerned particularly about women's place in our industries and organisations, and if so, what can be done to improve it? This article outlines the aims, approaches, achievements and future plans of a group which has been involved for the past seven years in promoting the development of women through training as a means of improving the position of women in employment.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2018

Arosha S. Adikaram

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how the particular culture within which research is conducted and its norms and values can give rise to additional challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how the particular culture within which research is conducted and its norms and values can give rise to additional challenges and complications for the researcher when the research area is sensitive in nature.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on research on sexual harassment of working women in Sri Lanka, the researcher engages in self and methodological reflections to elucidate the many challenges faced.

Findings

Carrying out sensitive research in an Asian cultural context, with various stereotyping cultural norms, values and beliefs can give rise to additional culture-specific challenges for the researcher, even when the researcher is a cultural insider. How these cultural complexities influence the manner in which the participants respond to data collection and the manner in which the researcher is seen and understood by others are explained. Strategies to overcome these challenges are discussed in light of the cultural competencies propose by Deardorff and Sewyer et al.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the need for researchers engaged in sensitive research to carefully plan and conduct their research, being mindful not only to the sensitive nature of the topic, but also to the cultural edifices and ethos.

Originality/value

The influence of cultural context in conducting sensitive research is not sufficiently addressed. Culture-specific challenges that can arise in cultures outside the West, such as Asia, have specifically being neglected. This paper addresses this knowledge gap by focusing on the culture-specific challenges faced by researchers, whether they are cultural insiders or outsiders.

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Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Charlotte Ryan and Gregory Squires

We argue that by conducting systematic research with communities rather than on communities, community-based research (CBR) methods can both advance the study of human…

Abstract

We argue that by conducting systematic research with communities rather than on communities, community-based research (CBR) methods can both advance the study of human interaction and strengthen public understanding and appreciation of social sciences. CBR, among other methods, can also address social scientists’ ethical and social commitments. We recap the history of calls by leading sociologists for rigorous, empirical, community-engaged research. We introduce CBR methods as empirically grounded methods for conducting social research with social actors. We define terms and describe the range of methods that we include in the umbrella term, “community-based research.” After providing exemplars of community-based research, we review CBR’s advantages and challenges. We, next, summarize an intervention that we undertook as members of the Publication Committee of the URBAN Research Network’s Sociology section in which the committee developed and disseminated guidelines for peer review of community-based research. We also share initial responses from journal editors. In the conclusion, we revisit the potential of community-based research and note the consequences of neglecting community-based research traditions.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Margaret H. Vickers and Alexander Kouzmin

Fundamental “purposes” of Australian police organizations are examined, not with a view to solving the complex and ongoing question of an accountable police mandate, but…

Abstract

Fundamental “purposes” of Australian police organizations are examined, not with a view to solving the complex and ongoing question of an accountable police mandate, but to consider the difficulty of its reconciliation with the new managerialism sweeping numerous public organizations in Australia – police organizations included. Briefly explores the purposes of policing and a problematic police culture as a lead in to a discussion on the possibly deleterious effects of new managerialism and its associated management faddism. Problems associated with the theory of managerialism, which police managers may not be aware of, are explored: managerialism and economic rationalism; management fads and tool tropism; managerialism as a thinly veiled control agenda; and the potential human costs to police officers arising from managerialist approaches. Suggestions are made for ways forward for police organizations which include a recognition of the down‐side of managerialism and a suggested shift away from a belief in a purely rationalistic organization to one which recognizes and accommodates an actor’s “voice” as a legitimate input to growth, learning and institutional development.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Tom Chen, Sarah Dodds, Jörg Finsterwalder, Lars Witell, Lilliemay Cheung, Mareike Falter, Tony Garry, Hannah Snyder and Janet R. McColl-Kennedy

People are responsible for their wellbeing, yet whether they take ownership of their own or even others' wellbeing might vary from actor to actor. Such psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

People are responsible for their wellbeing, yet whether they take ownership of their own or even others' wellbeing might vary from actor to actor. Such psychological ownership (PO) influences the dynamics of how wellbeing is co-created, particularly amongst actors, and ultimately determines actors' subjective wellbeing. The paper's research objective pertains to explicating the concept of the co-creation of wellbeing and conceptualizing the dynamics inherent to the co-creation of wellbeing with consideration of the influences of all involved actors from a PO perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

To provide a new conceptualization and framework for the dynamics of wellbeing co-creation, this research synthesizes wellbeing, PO and value co-creation literature. Four healthcare cases serve to illustrate the effects of engaged actors' PO on the co-creation of wellbeing.

Findings

The derived conceptual framework of dynamic co-creation of wellbeing suggests four main propositions: (1) the focal actor's wellbeing state is the intangible target of the focal actor's and other engaged actors' PO, transformed throughout the process of wellbeing co-creation, (2) PO over the focal actor's wellbeing state is subject to the three interrelated routes of exercising control, investing in the target, and intimately knowing the target, which determine the instigation of wellbeing co-creation, (3) the level of PO over the focal actor's wellbeing state can vary, influence and be influenced by the extent of wellbeing co-creation, (4) the co-creation of wellbeing, evoked by PO, is founded on resource integration, which influences the resources–challenges equilibrium of focal actor and of all other engaged actors, affecting individual subjective wellbeing.

Originality/value

This article provides a novel conceptual framework that can shed new light on the co-creation of wellbeing in service research. Through the introduction of PO the transformation of lives and wellbeing can be better understood.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Bridget Penhale and Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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