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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Steven Ackerman, Margaret Mooney, Stefanie Morrill, Joshua Morrill, Mary Thompson and Lika K. Balenovich

Web-based courses are a practical way to engage in meaningful discussions with learners from a diverse set of communities. By gathering online to learn about a topic…

Abstract

Purpose

Web-based courses are a practical way to engage in meaningful discussions with learners from a diverse set of communities. By gathering online to learn about a topic, learners can form communities that transcend geographic and political boundaries. This paper aims to investigate a partnership between the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) and Wisconsin Library Services, which brought open access online learning to thousands of lifelong learners around the state of Wisconsin. “Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region”, a massive open online course the UW-Madison launched in 2015, paired a regional focus with face-to-face discussions at 21 public libraries to deepen learners’ personal connections to the subject matter. Through strategic partnership, targeted course development and marketing of events, intimate local discussion sessions and statewide events provided fora in which Wisconsin residents would explore changing weather and climate with university faculty, staff and students.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case study approach and firsthand interview feedback from librarians, library staff and university faculty and staff who were leading the effort.

Findings

This paper explores the lessons learned and practical implications from the project and offers insight into libraries and universities looking to engage specific communities in non-credit online learning projects into the future.

Originality/value

This effort was a first of its kind partnership for the University and the State of Wisconsin.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Wendee Eyler and Margaret Mooney

For libraries without an integrated online catalog equipped with anautomated authority control function, the maintenance of an authorityfile is a highly complex and…

Abstract

For libraries without an integrated online catalog equipped with an automated authority control function, the maintenance of an authority file is a highly complex and time‐consuming task. Although LC′s name and series authority records are readily available on OCLC, neither holdings nor local information can be added to these records and retained for future use. For the most part, libraries resort to maintaining a local authority file on 3 × 5 cards to assist in cataloging decision‐making.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Joseph Scanlon

The literature available on how communities deal with mass death, in particular body handling procedures, is sparse. Describes the actions of the various people involved…

Abstract

The literature available on how communities deal with mass death, in particular body handling procedures, is sparse. Describes the actions of the various people involved in the immediate aftermath of the Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1917 explosion. Also, but in less detail, examples the Rapid City flood, the Gander air crash, the Zeebrugge ferry disaster, the Tangsham earthquake, the Texas City explosion and the Kobe earthquake. Highlights the problems of handling bodies after a mass fatality incident: respect accorded to the dead individual; whether skilled individuals are there to take on the tasks, the tagging and identification procedures required and the setting up of temporary morgue facilities.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1926

At a meeting of the Barnstaple Rotary Club on November 5th, Mr. Percy Penhale, Borough Veterinary Inspector, read a paper upon bovine tuberculosis. Mr. Penhale said he…

Abstract

At a meeting of the Barnstaple Rotary Club on November 5th, Mr. Percy Penhale, Borough Veterinary Inspector, read a paper upon bovine tuberculosis. Mr. Penhale said he wished to speak with particular regard to a pure milk supply, which was a vital topic to them all. With consumption so rife as it was among human beings, veterinary surgeons marvelled that “the powers that be” apparently continued to regard the present state of affairs with apathy, and it was high time sweeping measures were adopted. There were various methods of infection, but cohabitation and inhalation were by far the most frequent, and almost always in a cow shippen or other confined space where tubercle bacilli had been voided from the bodies of previous subjects of the disease. In the early stages there were no appreciable symptoms, and the general condition of the animal might afford no information. Following a technical description of the disease, Mr. Penhale passed to its importance on the health of the general public. It did not stretch one's imagination far to see that the dairy herd was likely to be far more affected with tuberculosis than other cattle, as these were more often confined together in buildings. It was estimated by many eminent authorities that at least 33 per cent. of the dairy herd to‐day were tuberculous. In support of that he would say that in 56 herds tested around the Birmingham district 37 per cent. were found to be affected. It then became necessary to show that bovine tuberculosis was transmissible to mankind. This had been completely proved over and over again, but to what degree the general public was in total ignorance. In 1912 Mitchell, working in Edinburgh, discovered that 90 per cent. of cases of tuberculosis in the human being were bovine in origin. Those figures raised considerable criticism in the medical profession, but some time later Beng, working in the same city, confirmed Mitchell's experiences. It might, therefore, be taken as a fact that bovine infection was responsible for the majority of cases of tuberculosis in the human being. And bovine infection was but another name for milk infection. In the early days of life, when resistance to the disease was at its lowest, and cows' milk was the staple article of diet, the child was brought into contact with the constantly‐recurring possibilities of infection. To analyse the methods suggested for our protection, Pasteurization and boiling of milk had been the reiterated cry of many, and it was true that milk heated to 85 degrees centigrade (or 185 degrees Fahrenheit) would destroy all the tubercle bacilli or spores that the milk contained. But scientists were about equally divided. One half said that Pasteurization or boiling destroyed some of the necessary vitamines and salts that raw milk should contain. In any case, such methods should be unnecessary, and to his mind it was merely condoning an evil. Then microscopical examination of milk was very uncertain, and was not the safeguard so many would have them believe. Where could they look for the salvation? He unhesitatingly replied to the tuberculin test—the safest and surest test they were ever likely to know. He would have it applied to every milk‐bearing cow. In his view the milk of re actors should be forthwith condemned, or Pasteurized and used for calves.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Diane K. Kovacs and Angela Elkordy

Building a Web‐based e‐library may be the most important thing a library ever does. An important role for librarians in all types of libraries is the planning and/or…

Abstract

Building a Web‐based e‐library may be the most important thing a library ever does. An important role for librarians in all types of libraries is the planning and/or building of Web‐based e‐libraries. Offers a practical discussion of developing and implementing a collection plan for building Web‐based e‐libraries. The starting point for developing any collection plan is an assessment of the function of and need for an information collection and the audience it will serve. Discusses some guidelines and practical strategies on where and how to find, identify, evaluate and select appropriate Web‐based information resources. Focuses on Web‐based information resources rather than other electronic information resources such as CD‐ROM or fee‐based databases that have been discussed extensively in recent literature.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Lauren Fowler and Sally Bishop Shigley

Purpose – This chapter details the collaborative investigation of a neuroscientist and a literature scholar into whether reading literature increases empathy in health…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter details the collaborative investigation of a neuroscientist and a literature scholar into whether reading literature increases empathy in health professionals, pre-health professionals and students outside of health care. It also reflects on the role of different epistemologies that inform researchers’ approaches, and muses on how ethnicity, sexual orientation and class inform research and teaching

Methodology/Approach – Students watched or read Margaret Edson’s play W;t and were asked if the medical drama increased their sense of appropriate empathy in medical encounters. The original research employed the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy, electromyography and galvanic skin response to measure physiological markers of empathy. These results were then compared to the self-reflection of participants to determine whether or not the physiological responses mirrored the self-report. The reflections on how emotion impacted the research were primarily narrative essay-based accompanied by feminist other literary theories.

Findings – All participants in the original study reported an increase in empathy after reading or viewing the play. This affect was even stronger when they viewed a live performance. The researchers determined that the role that their ethnicity, age, sexual orientation and class needed further study, perhaps with different pieces of literature.

Originality/Value – This chapter reflects the interdisciplinary and epistemological challenges of two researchers from very different backgrounds and training and investigates the relationship between reading, physiological empathy and perceptions of empathy. It considers the difficult and controversial challenges to quantifying emotions and the role emotions play in academic collaboration.

Details

Emotion and the Researcher: Sites, Subjectivities, and Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-611-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2016

Adrienne Roberts

The proliferation of homelessness and housing precariousness, along with a dramatic growth in food banks, are two signs that while parts of the UK economy may be…

Abstract

The proliferation of homelessness and housing precariousness, along with a dramatic growth in food banks, are two signs that while parts of the UK economy may be recovering from the 2008 financial crisis and recession, the same cannot be said for the living conditions of much of the poor and working class population. Much of the media discussion has centered on the ways in which these social ills have been caused by government policy, particularly cuts to social and welfare services introduced under the banner of “austerity.” I argue in this paper, however, that a narrow focus on austerity risks obscuring some of the longer-term structural transformations that have taken place under neoliberal capitalism, namely: (1) financialization and (2) the privatization of social reproduction. Situating these two trends within a longer history of capitalism, I argue, allows us to understand the contemporary housing and food crises as specific (and highly gendered) manifestations of a more fundamental contradiction between capital accumulation and progressive and sustainable forms of social reproduction. Doing so further helps to locate the dramatic proliferation of household debt, which has been supported by both processes, as both cause and consequence of the crisis in social reproduction faced by many UK households.

Details

Risking Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-235-4

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2010

Margaret Deery and Leo Jago

The research focusing on the social impacts of events on communities has reached a level of critical mass and this paper aims to synthesise the literature, including the…

Abstract

Purpose

The research focusing on the social impacts of events on communities has reached a level of critical mass and this paper aims to synthesise the literature, including the research methods used and analytical techniques that have been employed in order to provide a platform for future research in this important area.

Design/methodology/approach

The key method used is a literature review of all the available academic research into the social impacts of events on communities and the development of a model for future research.

Findings

After reviewing the social impact literature, the paper finds that one negative social impact, in particular, has the potential to undermine the key positive impacts that events can deliver for a host community. This impact, which is collectively known as anti‐social behaviour (ASB) incorporates behaviour such as drunken, rowdy and potentially life and property threatening behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The consequences of the impact of ASB are so serious, partly because it is an impact which the media often highlight, can seriously tarnish the image of an event in the eyes of the local community and reduce their pride in the destination. Community tourism leaders need to manage this impact in order to maintain resident support. The paper concludes with a model for future research into the social impacts of events on communities, focusing on the role that ASB plays in residents' perceptions of events.

Originality/value

This paper provides a review of the literature on social impacts to date and is a resource for researchers in the area. In addition, the paper highlights the role that ASB plays in aggravating negative perceptions of tourism in communities and the need for a more in‐depth understanding of ASB.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Tim Bateman and Hannah Smithson

Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1964

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a…

Abstract

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a manufacturing community able to provide a standard of living second to that of the United States. (At the present time only 10.8 per cent of Canadians live on farms according to the 1961 census.) Natural resources, such as timber, wheat and mining, continue to play, however, an important role in the life of the nation. As in most developing and pioneer countries, learning has had to assume a secondary role compared with other enterprises and activities. This is gradually beginning to change as more people continue in school and the percentage of individuals attending university increases. Established organizations, like the National Film Board and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, catering to mass culture, have been strengthened and enlarged and new establishments, like the Canada Council and the Stratford Shakespearean Festival, of narrower function and appeal, have been set up. The Library movement, not the least of learning agencies, is gaining strength every day. In this paper some of the interesting new developments of the last ten years in the latter field will be discussed. Of necessity, much is abbreviated; a lot is ignored. Data selected has been based on the most recent sources; hence the variety in dates.

Details

New Library World, vol. 65 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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