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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Margaret McAllister, Cathie Withyman and Bruce Allen Knight

The implementation of mental health promotion is a core part of the role for all mental health professionals. This involves working with individuals and groups to…

Abstract

Purpose

The implementation of mental health promotion is a core part of the role for all mental health professionals. This involves working with individuals and groups to facilitate the uptake and application of new knowledge, skills and personal attributes. Recently, an Australian intervention that included teaching nurses and educators the skills of mental health promotion was implemented and evaluated. The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of the qualitative evaluation and explore specific attributes of this facilitation, which helps to clarify and articulate a hidden, and taken-for-granted practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative mixed-methods study was designed to evaluate the perceived skills and attributes necessary for effective facilitation of a mental health promotion program in schools.

Findings

This evaluation revealed that facilitation is more than simply allowing free-flowing discussion amongst participants. For mental health promotion to be effective, the leader needs to be able to balance content delivery with flexibility, to use interpersonal behaviors that support and empower, and be willing to see the self as always learning and growing.

Practical implications

Without explicit training or discussion of facilitation, it is possible that mental health professionals may slip into teaching didactically. Didactic teaching may not empower learners to articulate their own views, or internalize and demonstrate new skills. A facilitative approach is more fitting to the values of twenty-first-century health promotion. Facilitation is a skill that deserves to be taught explicitly within all mental health promotion courses, so that mental health professionals are inspired to teach in ways that are transactional, and empowering.

Originality/value

A facilitative approach is more fitting to the values of twenty-first-century health promotion. This study confirms that facilitation is a skill that deserves to be taught explicitly to all mental health professionals so they are inspired to implement effec"tive mental health promotion.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Margaret McAllister, Donna Lee Brien, June Alexander and Trudi Flynn

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential benefits that books, and specifically memoirs, may offer mental health students, positing that first person…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential benefits that books, and specifically memoirs, may offer mental health students, positing that first person testimonials may make the complex experiences of a mental health challenge, in this case eating disorders (ED), accessible to learners.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a pedagogical approach, based on transformative learning (TL), to assist in encouraging the development of a Recovery Approach in students. TL is a pedagogy that is interested in problematic practices that keep afflicting an area such as mental health, such as the imbalanced focus on learning illness rather than wellbeing, and in pondering and revising the educational solutions.

Findings

The paper proposes that forward movement in this area will be based on considering and developing such innovative curricula, and researching its impact.

Originality/value

By virtue of their accessibility, memoirs could offer to a large audience the benefits of universality, empathy, hope and guidance. Teachers and learners could be making use of these books in face-to-face or online activities. This paper explores the groundwork that is needed before ED memoirs can be confidently recommended as an empowering tool.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Margaret McAllister, Shirley Morrissey, Donna McAuliffe, Graham Davidson, Harry McConnell and Prasuna Reddy

It is now common place for mental health services to operate using multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) where several health professionals simultaneously maintain their…

Abstract

Purpose

It is now common place for mental health services to operate using multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) where several health professionals simultaneously maintain their disciplinary distinctiveness and assume complementary professional roles. This requires awareness of other team members' disciplines and good team‐work skills. Yet in Australia, the preparation of health professionals continues to occur primarily in single‐discipline programs, where interaction with other disciplines often only occurs in an ad hoc, time‐limited way during clinical placement. This paper seeks to provide serious reflection on preparing students for the multidisciplinary practice within the mental health system.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors introduce a student placement preparation learning package that was developed and trialled with a range of health professional students at two Australian universities. Transformative learning principles underpinned the development of the education materials and related activities, which were designed to sensitise students to the potential problems that arise within MDTs and to equip them with communication strategies for use in their university placement experiences, as well as in their future professional practice.

Findings

The very large majority of student placement preparation workshop participants rated the workshop activities as extremely helpful. After participating in the activities, the very large majority of participants strongly endorsed the workshop learning objectives of understanding the different roles of MDTs members, skills required for working in MDTs, principles of collaborative team‐work and respectful, positive attitudes to MDTs members.

Originality/value

The transformative learning approaches to education of health professionals which are described in this paper help students to examine ways to think more critically and constructively about MDTs.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Margaret McAllister, Dixie Statham, Florin Oprescu, Nigel Barr, Teressa Schmidt, Christine Boulter, Penny Taylor, Jo McMillan, Shauna Jackson and Lisa Raith

Government-run mental health services in Australia run predominantly on a multidisciplinary team (MDT) model. Literature and observation from practice shows that…

Abstract

Purpose

Government-run mental health services in Australia run predominantly on a multidisciplinary team (MDT) model. Literature and observation from practice shows that interprofessional tertiary sector training is absent, ad hoc or not documented, leaving students inadequately prepared for disciplinary differences in opinions and practices. Learning in interprofessional educational settings provides one way of overcoming the difficulties. The purpose of this paper is to describe the outcomes of an interprofessional learning experience targeting final year Australian students enroled in health promotion, registered nursing, enroled nursing, paramedic science, psychology, social work and occupational therapy who are intending to work in mental health teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed method, pre- and post-test design (four time intervals), with data collected from three scales and open-ended questions, this study measured participant changes in knowledge and attitudes towards interprofessional education and mental health. The study also examined students’ and educators’ perceptions of the value of an interprofessional teaching and learning model.

Findings

There was a significant increase in clinical confidence at each time interval, suggesting that the intervention effects were maintained up to three months post-training. Themes about the value of interprofessional learning in mental health were extracted from student data: learning expanded students’ appreciation for difference; this in turn expanded students’ cross-disciplinary communication skills; growing appreciation for diverse world views was seen to be relevant to person-centred mental healthcare; and practice articulating one's own disciplinary views clarified professional identity.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisability of the outcomes beyond the disciplines sampled in this research is limited. MDTs typically include doctors, but we were unable to include medical students because the university did not offer a medical programme. The readiness for participation in a collaborative MDT approach may differ among students groups, disciplines and universities and technical and further educations. There may also be differences not accounted for in these findings between undergraduate students and established healthcare professionals. Further research needs to establish whether the findings are applicable to other student groups and to professionals who already work within MDTs.

Originality/value

These results demonstrate that intensive interprofessional learning experiences in tertiary education can be effective means of increasing students’ awareness of the role of other professionals in MDT.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Di Bailey

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Zahra Seyedghorban, Dayna Simpson and Margaret Jekanyika Matanda

The purpose of this study is to explore the dynamics of trust creation in an early buyer–supplier relationship phase at the interpersonal level. The authors use a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the dynamics of trust creation in an early buyer–supplier relationship phase at the interpersonal level. The authors use a brand-based communication approach to investigate the trust–risk–commitment link.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 204 senior managers in small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) in Australia were collected and analyzed.

Findings

Results indicate that ability, credibility, benevolence and persona of supplier brand representatives (SBRs) relate significantly to a buyers’ trust in SBR, leading to diminished perceived risk, and increased relationship commitment between the parties. These findings support the importance of using individual representatives who are able to broadcast their supplier’s brand values, and increase trust in exploratory buyer–supplier relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This research focused on SMEs in Australia, investigating exploratory phase of the interpersonal relationships. Future research can investigate large firms interacting in different relationship phases in the light of brand-based communication.

Practical implications

The study describes several strategies for both buying and supplying firms to use, to best use brand-based communication as a means to build trust in the early phases of buyer–supplier relationships.

Originality/value

Prior research has focused on interorganizational trust and established or mature buyer–supplier relationships. This study investigates the initial phase of buyer–supplier relationships, and at the interpersonal exchange level. It also incorporates a role for brand-based communication in the buyer–supplier relationship which has received limited attention in the literature.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Judith A. DiIorio

Men make war; women make peace. Men make war; women make children. Men make war because women make children. Because men make war, women make children. Women make peace…

Abstract

Men make war; women make peace. Men make war; women make children. Men make war because women make children. Because men make war, women make children. Women make peace because they make children.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Angela Shapiro, Joanna Marshall Bhullar and Margaret McShane

Since 2011, Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) in Scotland has delivered pre-entry study skills programs, specifically tailored to meet the needs of students with…

Abstract

Since 2011, Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) in Scotland has delivered pre-entry study skills programs, specifically tailored to meet the needs of students with disabilities prior to commencing their studies at university. Following changes in the organizational structure, these programs ceased to exist. Two staff members then decided to collaborate on delivering a new customized program that would contextualize the type of support required by students with disabilities.

The study skills program aimed to increase confidence, engage with support services before the start of the program of study, encourage students to access support as early as possible, and provide useful advice on a range of topics specifically designed to meet their needs.

In this chapter, findings from a small-scale study will be presented that investigated whether a correlation could be drawn between pre-entry support and increased confidence. Although feedback from attendees at the study skills’ workshops has been positive, the impact of this type of support is difficult to quantify. This is partly due to the small numbers of participants and the plethora of student support initiatives at the institution. However, the qualitative outcomes indicate that students have integrated successfully into their degree studies.

Details

Strategies for Facilitating Inclusive Campuses in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-065-9

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Magda Pieczka

The purpose of this paper is to offer critical reflection on the role played by the concept of dialogue in public relations theory, pedagogy, and practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer critical reflection on the role played by the concept of dialogue in public relations theory, pedagogy, and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is theoretical and therefore focused on the elucidation of the history, meaning, and application of “dialogue” in public relations in comparison with two other academic disciplines and professional fields: political science and organizational communication.

Findings

The paper argues that, despite the key normative position occupied by the concept of dialogue in much mainstream public relations scholarship, public relations as an academic discipline has not engaged extensively with the theory of dialogue. While other academic and expert practitioner fields have developed much theoretical reflection, a range of dialogical tools, and created spaces in which the expertise is applied, public relations' normative interest in dialogue seems not to have translated into developing expert dialogic tools or spaces in which public relations experts routinely use such tools.

Originality/value

The paper introduces literature and debates about dialogue largely ignored in the mainstream public relations scholarship and aims to stimulate fresh discussion about the nature of public relations knowledge and practice.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2007

Naomi B. Rothman and Batia M. Wiesenfeld

Past research exploring the influence of affect on group outcomes has primarily considered how the experience of single emotions and mood vary and converge across group…

Abstract

Past research exploring the influence of affect on group outcomes has primarily considered how the experience of single emotions and mood vary and converge across group members, but does not address the fact that a single group member may express multiple, conflicting emotions simultaneously (e.g., emotional ambivalence). Such complex expressions may drastically alter the way other group members perceive and respond to one another, and in turn, drastically alter the group-level dynamics. We address this gap in the literature by modeling the social consequences of expressing emotional ambivalence, thereby expanding our understanding of emotional ambivalence in group contexts. Implications for research on emotional ambivalence and research on emotions in groups are discussed.

Details

Affect and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1413-3

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