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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Shaun Trujillo, Meghan Bergin, Margaret Jessup, Johanna Radding and Sarah Walden McGowan

This work aims to provide a report on adopting a consortial model of collaboration toward understanding digital preservation practice.

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to provide a report on adopting a consortial model of collaboration toward understanding digital preservation practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This work provides a case study detailing the work and outcomes of a digital preservation pilot project undertaken by the Five College Libraries between 2014 and 2015.

Findings

Digital preservation is a broad endeavor and rapidly developing facet of digital collections and institutional repositories; yet, it is often an area that is not fully understood or implemented by many libraries and archives, largely because institutions lack the necessary resources to do it alone. Working across institutional lines provides a possible solution to overcoming resource limitations and general challenges for pursuing robust digital preservation programs.

Research limitations/implications

Findings reported in this work are based on a limited-scope pilot project. Several questions laid out during the pilot remain unanswered at its close.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into an experimental process rarely reported in library and information science literature. The goal of the paper is to provide a reference point for institutions pursuing a consortial approach to the challenges of applied digital preservation practice.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Herbert L. Jensen

Neural networks offer an alternative to numerical scoring schemes for credit granting and extension decisions. A standard back‐ propagation neural network running on a DOS…

Abstract

Neural networks offer an alternative to numerical scoring schemes for credit granting and extension decisions. A standard back‐ propagation neural network running on a DOS personal computer is used with 125 credit applicants whose loan outcomes are known. Applicant characteristics are described as input neurons receiving values representing the individuals' demographic and credit information. Three categories of payment history, delinquent, charged‐off, and paid‐off, are used as the networks output neurons to depict the loan outcomes. After training on part of the data, correct classifications were made on 76–80% of the holdout sample.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1970

I'VE said it before, and I'll say it again: Eastbourne is an excellent place for a conference, and I set out for it after five years' absence with the hope that its…

Abstract

I'VE said it before, and I'll say it again: Eastbourne is an excellent place for a conference, and I set out for it after five years' absence with the hope that its handsome and genial presence would produce something better than the mixture of ordinary, obvious and sometimes inaudible papers that have been a constituent of more than one intervening conference. That towns can affect such occasions is no doubt a farfetched conceit, but they certainly affect me; as soon as I arrived the environmental magic worked, and old friends and new faces were seen in the golden light of perfect autumn weather.

Details

New Library World, vol. 72 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Mary Weir and Jim Hughes

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing…

Abstract

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing concern that the product range is obsolete, that manufacturing facilities are totally inadequate and that there is a complete absence of any real management substance or structure. They decide on the need to relocate urgently so as to provide continuity of supply at the very high — a market about to shrink at a rate unprecedented in its history.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2004

Susan Moore Johnson

Certain features of collective bargaining have, over time, promoted uniformity and sometimes inflexibility in teacher policy and negotiated contracts. From the start, the…

Abstract

Certain features of collective bargaining have, over time, promoted uniformity and sometimes inflexibility in teacher policy and negotiated contracts. From the start, the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) – passed in 1935 to regulate unionization and collective bargaining in the private, industrial sector – served as the template for state labor laws regulating education. The framers of the NLRA never had the needs of the public sector or schools in mind. Yet the 35 states that now require collective bargaining for teachers have drawn on the NLRA’s procedures and standards. For example, they have used the NLRA for defining how teachers organize and are represented; what constitutes an unfair labor practice; and how obligatory membership or dues provide union security (e.g. agency shop, union shop). They have also drawn on the NLRA to define what range of issues can be bargained; whether strikes are legal; and what processes are used to resolve an impasse (e.g. mediation, fact finding, binding arbitration, or all three).1 Although the laws of the 35 states show some important variations, their similarity is more striking than their differences. Jessup (1985) concluded that the narrow scope of bargaining established by New York’s Taylor Law “severely restricted the range of concerns teachers could productively bring to the bargaining table” (p. 195).

Details

Teacher Unions and Education Policy: Retrenchment of Reform?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-126-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2007

Seung-Yoon Rhee

I argue that while research on collective emotions is gaining in popularity, there has not been sufficient attention paid to understanding the mechanisms that explain how…

Abstract

I argue that while research on collective emotions is gaining in popularity, there has not been sufficient attention paid to understanding the mechanisms that explain how and why group emotions influence group outcomes. The goal of this chapter is to fill this gap by introducing group-member interactions as a group-level mechanism. I explore how positive and negative collective emotions in workgroups link to different types of member interactions, which in turn, influence group outcomes. Finally, I discuss the theoretical contributions of the research and the implications for future research on workgroup emotions and member interactions.

Details

Affect and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1413-3

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2012

Gregory B. Northcraft and Kevin W. Rockmann

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the implications of viewing group decision-making through the lens of a social dilemma.Design/methodology/approach …

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the implications of viewing group decision-making through the lens of a social dilemma.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter reviews the literature on why group decision-making often fails to live up to its potential, and then applies the social dilemma perspective to develop new insights about how the limitations of group decision-making might be overcome.

Findings – Applying the social dilemma perspective to group decision-making provides several prescriptions for group decision-making improvement by highlighting a critical distinction between participation and engagement.

Limitations – An important limitation of applying the social dilemma perspective to group decision-making is that improving group engagement by redefining member duty carries the risk of energizing dissent that only questions the group's answer and not the group's question.

Practical implications – The chapter refocuses the dialogue about group decision-making effectiveness away from “just” participation to include group member engagement.

Social implications – A key social implication of this chapter is that all social behavior represents a social dilemma, and that viewing everyday social activities (such as group decision-making) as social dilemmas can help identify new ways to understand cooperation failures and thereby improve future cooperation in groups.

Originality/value – The chapter extends and re-energizes research on group decision-making by providing a fresh lens – the social dilemma perspective – through which to understand and improve group decision-making failures.

Details

Looking Back, Moving Forward: A Review of Group and Team-Based Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-030-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Richard Cardinali

An old, often‐paraphrased adage (generally attributed to Georges Clemenceau) suggests that “war is too important to be left to the generals”. Similarly, military…

Abstract

An old, often‐paraphrased adage (generally attributed to Georges Clemenceau) suggests that “war is too important to be left to the generals”. Similarly, military privatization/outsourcing is too important to be left to civilian accountants. The concept brings fear to labor unions and bureaucrats, and is a source of considerable risk. This paper examines potential benefits and potential problems associated with such privatization and outsourcing, alongside the cultural and psychological barriers to its acceptance.

Details

Work Study, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Keywords

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