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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Louise Alexander, Jade Sheen, Nicole Rinehart, Margaret Hay and Lee Boyd

This critical review of historical and contemporary literature explores the role of television media in the prevalence of stigma towards persons experiencing a mental…

Abstract

Purpose

This critical review of historical and contemporary literature explores the role of television media in the prevalence of stigma towards persons experiencing a mental health challenge. In addition to this, the purpose of this paper is to examine the notion of perceived dangerousness, which is a concept where persons with mental illness are thought by others to be inherently dangerous.

Design/methodology/approach

A vigorous search of databases was undertaken for articles published between 2000 and 2016. Some seminal literature prior to 2000 was used to compare historical data with current literature. In total, 1,037 publications were reviewed against inclusion criteria.

Findings

While mental illness stigma has received much attention in the literature, television media and public perceptions of dangerousness have not. While these concepts are complex and multi-factorial, what we do understand is that approaches to address stigma have been largely unsuccessful, and that persons experiencing mental health challenges continue to be significantly disadvantaged.

Practical implications

Implications to practice for clinicians working in mental health on this issue have not been adequately explored within the literature. While media guidelines assist journalists to make informed choices when they portray mental health issues in television news, there are no such guidelines to inform drama television viewing.

Originality/value

Significantly, television’s role in perpetuation of perceptions of dangerousness has not been adequately explored as a combined co-occurring factor associated with the stigmatisation and avoidance of persons experiencing a mental health challenge. In an era when mental health challenges are on the rise, it is of great importance that we collectively seek to minimise negative impacts and improve the experiences of those with a mental health challenge through addressing stigma both individually and in television media.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Dennis James Foster, Terrence Hays and Frances Alter

This paper aims to assist researchers considering the benefits and constraints of re‐using previously collected data (sourced from media in the public domain) as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assist researchers considering the benefits and constraints of re‐using previously collected data (sourced from media in the public domain) as the sample for a grounded theory qualitative research inquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies what were perceived by the researchers as methodological challenges, encountered in the context of a study using grounded theory methodology. The seven areas included: the re‐use of qualitative data, forming the research question, developing the research approach, refining the methodology, ensuring data quality, maintaining methodological integrity, and developing ethical boundaries. It outlines the process of working through these challenges and explains the solutions adopted throughout the course of the research project.

Findings

The findings from this study indicate that while re‐using data can be perceived as a constraint in qualitative research, what is not adequately taken into consideration is the actual quality of the archival material that forms the body of collected data. The researchers also illustrate the benefits of using rich archival material in the context of a single research project and caution that the re‐use of previously collected data is not a soft option, nor does it offer a fast track to completion.

Research limitations/implications

Solutions to challenges described in the article may not be immediately applicable to other research contexts or archives of data.

Practical implications

Researchers can adopt approaches similar to those outlined in the paper to assess the applicability of archives of previously‐collected qualitative data as the sample for complementary or supplementary research.

Originality/value

The paper presents solutions to seven commonly perceived challenges to the re‐use of previously collected data as the sample for qualitative research.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2011

Yeri Cho, Jennifer R. Overbeck and Peter J. Carnevale

Purpose – Although extensive research shows that power affects negotiator performance, few efforts have been made to investigate how status conflict among negotiators…

Abstract

Purpose – Although extensive research shows that power affects negotiator performance, few efforts have been made to investigate how status conflict among negotiators affects negotiation. This chapter addresses this limitation and explores the question that when groups experience status conflict while simultaneously conducting negotiations, how this status conflict affects negotiator behavior and negotiation outcome.

Approach – We define three basic forms of status contest and develop 12 propositions about the impact of status conflict on between-group negotiator behavior and negotiation outcome.

Findings – We propose that when negotiating with an outgroup, negotiators who experience within-group status conflict will use the outgroup to increase their status within group by demonstrating their value to their own group. In the situation of wholly within-group status conflict and within-group negotiation, individual negotiators will use group concern to gain status. This group concern leads to more value-creating behaviors, but lessens the likelihood of reaching an agreement. When groups experience intergroup status conflict alongside intergroup negotiation, the likelihood of agreement, and the likelihood of integrative agreement, decreases and this is due to an increase in contentiousness.

Value – This chapter suggests that status conflict is an important, albeit neglected, aspect of negotiation and it can affect the outcome of the negotiation. Greater research attention toward status conflict in negotiation should help to improve negotiation effectiveness and the quality of agreements.

Details

Negotiation and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-560-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

DANIEL HAY

In an earlier paper Daniel Hay has described the Wick Library in which his professional career began. In the following short piece, here published posthumously, he…

Abstract

In an earlier paper Daniel Hay has described the Wick Library in which his professional career began. In the following short piece, here published posthumously, he considers a number of the readers whose needs and tastes he had reason to study. How far the records maintained in most libraries could today furnish such retrospective data may be doubted.

Details

Library Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2018

Logamurthie Athiemoolam

The purpose of the paper is to provide a detailed account of pre-service teachers’ viewpoints on the use of tableaux as pedagogy to analyse short stories in secondary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide a detailed account of pre-service teachers’ viewpoints on the use of tableaux as pedagogy to analyse short stories in secondary schools based on their exposure to the use of tableaux and their active participation in the process of tableau creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative approach and a phenomenological design as it provides a detailed account of PGCE English Methodology pre-service teachers’ views on the use of tableaux to teach a short story. The data collection method used was written narratives based on the participants’ detailed accounts of their learning during the process of tableau creation and their viewpoints on the use of such an approach in the teaching of literature within secondary school contexts. The “rich, thick data” extracted from the written narratives were analysed thematically.

Findings

The findings indicated that although pre-service teachers were initially sceptical towards the use of tableaux as a strategy to teach a short story, as they grew in their understanding of the practices involved their insights into the themes, motifs and characters’ emotional, personal and psychological states of being were enhanced.

Originality/value

Research in the use of tableaux as a strategy for pre-service teachers to critically analyse and engage with short stories is a novel approach to teaching and limited research has been conducted in the field.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1950

THE centenary celebration is that of the apparently prosaic public library acts ; it is not the centenary of libraries which are as old as civilization. That is a…

Abstract

THE centenary celebration is that of the apparently prosaic public library acts ; it is not the centenary of libraries which are as old as civilization. That is a circumstance which some may have overlooked in their pride and enthusiasm for the public library. But no real librarian of any type will fail to rejoice in the progress to which the celebration is witness. For that has been immense. We are to have a centenary history of the Public Library Movement—that is not its title—from the Library Association. We do not know if it will be available in London this month; we fear it will not. We do know its author, Mr. W. A. Munford, has spent many months in research for it and that he is a writer with a lucid and individual Style. We contemplate his task with a certain nervousness. Could anyone less than a Carlyle impart into the dry bones of municipal library history that Strew these hundred years, the bones by the wayside that mark out the way, the breath of the spirit that will make them live ? For even Edward Edwards, whose name should be much in the minds and perhaps on the lips of library lovers this month, could scarcely have foreseen the contemporary position ; nor perhaps could Carlyle who asked before our genesis why there should not be in every county town a county library as well as a county gaol. How remote the days when such a question was cogent seem to be now! It behoves us, indeed it honours us, to recall the work of Edwards, of Ewart, Brotherton, Thomas Greenwood, Nicholson, Peter Cowell, Crestadoro, Francis Barrett, Thomas Lyster, J. Y. M. MacAlister, James Duff Brown and, in a later day without mentioning the living, John Ballinger, Ernest A. Baker, L. Stanley Jast, and Potter Briscoe—the list is long. All served the movement we celebrate and all faced a community which had to be convinced. It still has, of course, but our people do now allow libraries a place, more or less respected, in the life of the people. Librarians no longer face the corpse‐cold incredulity of the so‐called educated classes, the indifference of the masses and the actively vicious hostility of local legislators. Except the illuminated few that existed. These were the men who had the faith that an informed people was a happier, more efficient one and that books in widest commonalty spread were the best means of producing such a people. These, with a succession of believing, enduring librarians, persisted in their Struggle with cynic and opponent and brought about the system and the technique we use, modified of course and extended to meet a changing world, but essentially the same. Three names we may especially honour this September, Edward Edwards, who was the sower of the seed; MacAlister, who gained us our Royal Charter ; and John Ballinger, who was the person who most influenced the introduction of the liberating Libraries Act of 1919.

Details

New Library World, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1947

We have pleasure in acknowledging the courtesy of the Public Health Authorities of the State of Queensland, Australia, for sending us this record. Want of space compels…

Abstract

We have pleasure in acknowledging the courtesy of the Public Health Authorities of the State of Queensland, Australia, for sending us this record. Want of space compels briefness, but we hope that the few points to which we have drawn notice may prove of interest to readers. We are concerned with the work of the Government Chemical Laboratory and local authorities so far as that relates to the purity, storage, and handling of the food supply. Action is taken under the Food and Drug sections of the Health Acts, and Regulations connected therewith. The difficulties naturally arising in the administration of a vast and sparsely populated tropical territory have been increased, there as here, by shortage of labour and materials of all kinds. So that schemes devised by local authorities in the interests of public health have in many instances been seriously delayed. The Chief of the Government Chemical Laboratory remarks that the Department has worked under incessant pressure for many years. “ The well informed, versatile and competent practitioners ” demanded by the service are not at present available outside the Government service, and “ unless they are forthcoming from time to time to rejuvenate the staff the laboratory may be reduced to a laboratory of professional labourers.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Margaret Severson, Judy L. Postmus and Marianne Berry

The increasing rate of imprisonment of women in the United States and the over‐representation of women victims of violence in the corrections system confirms that there…

Abstract

The increasing rate of imprisonment of women in the United States and the over‐representation of women victims of violence in the corrections system confirms that there are long‐term, often substantially debilitating consequences to women victims of intimate partner violence, sexual violence and youth maltreatment and injury, including incarceration. As part of a study funded by the National Institute of Justice, the authors pursued an exploration of the personal risks, resiliencies and life opportunities that make a difference in the lives of women who have ended up incarcerated. The findings of this study about the prevalence and consequences of youth maltreatment and adult victimization and the mitigating factors, which may have had an impact on the life trajectories of adult incarcerated women will be reviewed. Recommendations will be given for preventive and interventive policy and practice measures that stand to reduce the negative consequences of victimization, particularly those that can prevent incarceration.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 1 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2014

Amiya Kumar Bagchi

The issue of the existence and persistence of a labour aristocracy in advanced capitalist countries is connected with the emergence and persistence of an extremely unequal…

Abstract

The issue of the existence and persistence of a labour aristocracy in advanced capitalist countries is connected with the emergence and persistence of an extremely unequal international economic order. The emergence of that order is the direct result of capitalist colonialism. That colonialism helped garner and control resources for the pioneering capitalist countries, which also emerged as the top imperialist countries of the world. The colonial resources were used to support and augment the profits of the capitalist class, but after the immiserizing phase of industrialization had passed, they also helped increase the incomes of workers in the advanced capitalist countries. Workers’ struggles and the threat of such struggles in some phases of development of capitalism led to increases in their incomes. However, there are instances in which the ruling class in the USA and UK deliberately used the lure of private property or acquisition of colonies to try and get their support. Thus, the debate between Post and Cope can only be resolved by invoking the complexities of the patterns of exploitation and governance under actually existing capitalism.

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