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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Gerald Vinten and Margaret Greening

Building societies developed in the second half of the 18th century when country people came flooding into the towns and cities to provide the workforce for the new…

Abstract

Building societies developed in the second half of the 18th century when country people came flooding into the towns and cities to provide the workforce for the new factories. Faced with a lack of suitable housing in industrial centres, more enterprising and prosperous workers clubbed together to build their own homes. The first building society was established in Birmingham in 1775.

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Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2002

Margaret L. Young

Abstract

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Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-851-4

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Michael A. Lodato, Scott Highhouse and Margaret E. Brooks

Many human resource professionals erroneously believe that they can hire the best employees without the assistance of decision aids. The purpose of this study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Many human resource professionals erroneously believe that they can hire the best employees without the assistance of decision aids. The purpose of this study is to examine personal and situational characteristics that may relate to preference for intuition‐based approaches to hiring employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative sample of 206 managers and directors of human resources management was asked to complete an online questionnaire addressing psychological constructs and career information.

Findings

The authors found that the profile of a professional who prefers intuition‐based hiring is one who is an experiential thinker (i.e. tends to make everyday decisions based on feelings), is less experienced, works for a smaller organization, and does not possess advanced professional certification. Hiring context (i.e. selecting hourly versus salaried employees) did not influence preferences for intuition‐based hiring.

Research limitations/implications

Elements of the study are cross‐sectional and based on self‐reports. This does not allow for causal interpretations and increases the risk of common method bias.

Practical implications

Qualities that serve a human resource professional well in some aspects of work performance may interfere with the adoption of evidence‐based practices.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the characteristics of human resource professionals that are associated with a preference for intuition‐based hiring, and provides a new measure of selection decision‐making approach that may be used as a dependent variable in future research on the topic.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2011

Deborah A. O'Neil, Margaret M. Hopkins and Sherry E. Sullivan

The use of women's networks is emerging as one method of advancing women's careers within organizations. However, the value of these networks has been questioned. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of women's networks is emerging as one method of advancing women's careers within organizations. However, the value of these networks has been questioned. The purpose of this study is to examine how potential differences in the perceptions of network members and the firm's executive leadership about the purposes and anticipated outcomes of a women's network may impact women's career advancement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed 21 members of an intra‐firm women's network and six members of the executive leadership team of a global organization. To examine the qualitative data, they used a process of thematic analysis to discover prevalent themes in the transcribed interviews.

Findings

Both members of the women's network and the executive leadership team placed responsibility for women's career advancement upon the individual; the firm's male‐dominated culture and organizational constraints were not emphasized. While members of the women's network recognized how the network could be used to contribute to the firm's strategic goals, the executive leadership team did not recognize the network's possible effect on the firm's bottom line.

Originality/value

Examines how potential differences in the perceptions of network members and the firm's executive leadership about the purposes and anticipated outcomes of a women's network may impact women's career advancement.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1931

WINTER set in almost with Autumn this year, and the results have been felt in libraries. Added to the season has been the monetary position of the world and the election…

Abstract

WINTER set in almost with Autumn this year, and the results have been felt in libraries. Added to the season has been the monetary position of the world and the election in our own country in particular. It was to be expected that the election would slow up the use of libraries, but such reports as reach us are to the opposite effect. There have been definite increases in work done. This is important in face of the budgetting difficulties of libraries that are prophesied. The enforced leisure of unemployment has fallen on many men of the distinctly employable and therefore of the reading class, and these are finding encouragement and at least a temporary escape from their plight in books and in reading rooms. They may even find some new occupational interest there; and all good librarians will exploit the opportunities which this time of stress affords to the utmost. It is most important to keep level‐headed over difficulties, which we hope may be temporary for libraries, and not to acquiesce in panic retrench‐ments while ceding what is necessary to the general welfare. We cannot cede much; we have never had a superfluity.

Details

New Library World, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Tony Willis, Rosemary Suttill, Andrea Swire, Pat Lipinski and Elisabeth Russell‐Taylor

WHEN A biography of Dante Gabriel Rossetti was returned to Kendal library by post from Oxford University with a stamp on the date label of 5 Feb 1916 no one considered…

Abstract

WHEN A biography of Dante Gabriel Rossetti was returned to Kendal library by post from Oxford University with a stamp on the date label of 5 Feb 1916 no one considered this to be very startling news. There was a compliment slip inside apologising for the delay (‘It was lurking in one of our darker corners’). I sent them a brief note thanking them, and that I thought was that.

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New Library World, vol. 83 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1977

Leslie Collins

The age‐old question of “what's in a name?” is analysed from a marketing standpoint. The author studies the manifold effects of different names upon us, in a general…

Abstract

The age‐old question of “what's in a name?” is analysed from a marketing standpoint. The author studies the manifold effects of different names upon us, in a general context, and isolates two opposing principle's for evaluating brand nomenclature: the Juliet principle, in which a name is justified by its traditional associations; and the Joyce principle, where names depend on their phonetic symbolism to communicate an idea. Certain groups of letters have been shown, by experiment, to possess qualities of “darkness” or “lightness”, “largeness” or “smallness”, etc., to a concensus of people. A word can also have a symbolic function arising from the associations it produces in the minds of consumers. The author proceeds from these suggestions to evolve guidelines for those engaged in the creation of new brand names. He discusses the evaluation of not only “traditional” names, but also apparently meaningless names like “Omo” or “Kleenex”, and shows how certain names work, or might be expected to work, in the market situation. The name is the one unchangeable part of the marketing mix. This psycholinguistic approach helps to put the question of the “naming of brands” into perspective, giving criteria for a “good” name, and elucidating the stages of arriving at it. Finally, the author points out that wholeness of approach is necessary —the felicity of the name chosen will be conditioned by the depth of involvement of relevant personnel concerned with the new product.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1964

It is said that travel broadens the mind, deepens the understanding and refreshes the spirit. Judging by the amount of long distance travel undertaken nowadays by more…

Abstract

It is said that travel broadens the mind, deepens the understanding and refreshes the spirit. Judging by the amount of long distance travel undertaken nowadays by more people than ever before, it may also be said to widen the beam! However, this brief article is mainly concerned with the scope and benefits of the Library Association's programme of internships.

Details

New Library World, vol. 66 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1964

IT is said that travel broadens the mind, deepens the understanding and refreshes the spirit. Judging by the amount of long distance travel undertaken nowadays by more…

Abstract

IT is said that travel broadens the mind, deepens the understanding and refreshes the spirit. Judging by the amount of long distance travel undertaken nowadays by more people than ever before, it may also be said to widen the beam! However, this brief article is mainly concerned with the scope and benefits of the Library Association's programme of internships.

Details

New Library World, vol. 66 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

James A. Nelson

While Kentucky lags somewhat in the exploitation of new technologies and is last in the Southeast for percentage of state general fund investments in technology, it…

Abstract

While Kentucky lags somewhat in the exploitation of new technologies and is last in the Southeast for percentage of state general fund investments in technology, it probably leads the country in broad‐based, state‐level participation by all types of government agencies in technology planning. The Kentucky Information Resource Management Commission (KIRM), established under KRS 61.945, and its two primary sub‐groups, the Communications Advisory Council (CAC) and the Geographic Information Advisory Council (GIAC), provide a forum for participation by state executive agencies, local governments, and public universities. The statutory “roles and duties” assigned KIRM are detailed in sidebar 1.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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