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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Isobelle Barrett Meyering

In March 1969, Brisbane student and political activist Margaret Bailey was suspended from Inala High School – ostensibly for “undermining the authority” of her teacher …

Abstract

Purpose

In March 1969, Brisbane student and political activist Margaret Bailey was suspended from Inala High School – ostensibly for “undermining the authority” of her teacher – prompting claims of political suppression. Through a case study of the subsequent campaign for Bailey’s reinstatement, the purpose of this paper is to explain the emergence of the high school activist as a new political actor in the late 1960s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on newsletters and pamphlets produced by Brisbane activists, alongside articles from the left-wing and mainstream press, to reconstruct the key events of the campaign and trace the major arguments advanced by Bailey and her supporters.

Findings

Initiated by the high school activist group, Students in Dissent (SID), the campaign in support of Bailey lasted over two months, culminating in a “chain-in” staged by Bailey at the Queensland Treasury Building on 8 May. Linking together arguments about students’ rights, civil liberties and democratic government, the campaign reveals how high school activism was enabled not only by the broader climate of political dissent in the late 1960s, but by the increasing emphasis on secondary education as a right of modern citizenship in the preceding decades.

Originality/value

This is the first study of the campaign for Bailey’s reinstatement at Inala High School and one of the only analyses to date of the political mobilisation of high school students in Australia during the late 1960s. The case study of the Bailey campaign underlines that secondary school students were important players in the political contests of the late 1960s and, if only for brief periods, were able to command the attention of education officials, the media and leading politicians. It represents an important historical precedent for contemporary high school activism, including the global School Strike 4 Climate movement.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Margaret Fletcher and Sharon Loane

Abstract

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Margaret Fletcher

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Margaret Fletcher and Shameen Prashantham

The accumulation of knowledge and learning by firms has been identified as being critical to their internationalisation. This paper aims to explore the knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The accumulation of knowledge and learning by firms has been identified as being critical to their internationalisation. This paper aims to explore the knowledge assimilation processes of rapidly internationalising small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative enquiry in two stages. First, four case studies were selected from firms that were participating in an internationalisation programme run by Scottish Enterprise, the regional development agency. Data collection involved semi‐structured interviews with chief executive officers (CEOs) and programme providers, and archival data. Second, two focus groups were held with six CEOs participating in the programme.

Findings

The findings indicate that knowledge sharing is important for rapidly internationalising SMEs and that firms adopted high levels of formality in assimilating knowledge. Two key aspects of formality were identified as important; formal planned events to share explicit and tacit knowledge and the codification of tacit to explicit knowledge. Knowledge may be assimilated less formally by the retention of tacit knowledge as tacit, while utilising elements of formality. The paper finds that learning for internationalisation can be transferred to support domestic growth.

Practical implications

It is important for firms to develop appropriate knowledge assimilation processes within their management systems to support internationalisation. The CEO and management team need to take the lead in marshalling commitment to learning processes and in cultivating an organisational culture that is supportive of learning.

Originality/value

This research contributes to international entrepreneurship by providing insights into the knowledge assimilation processes employed by rapidly internationalising SMEs to manage the tensions between the need for greater formality to be efficient at learning, and informality to enable speedy decision making.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Liisa‐Maija Sainio, Sami Saarenketo, Niina Nummela and Taina Eriksson

In order to respond to the call for a broader perspective on the internationalization of entrepreneurial firms, this study aims to bring the business model concept to the…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to respond to the call for a broader perspective on the internationalization of entrepreneurial firms, this study aims to bring the business model concept to the context of international entrepreneurship, with special emphasis on the notion of value formation and value exchange at company interfaces.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross‐case study based on qualitative data from business model workshops with key company informants in each case firm.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate that, although the business models of firms with comparable positions may appear similar, there are fine‐grained differences both in their activities and in their value formation. In addition, the data collection workshops revealed that firms tend to neglect the inspection of their incentives to their partners, as they concentrate on value formation to end‐customers.

Practical implications

From the managerial point of view, the study shows how the managers of international entrepreneurial firms may describe and analyze their business model, including the whole value chain, systematically from the perspective of value exchange. Firms may gain insights from examining the business models of similar organizations.

Originality/value

Even though the role of the business model has also been discussed in previous studies, it has not been so explicitly pronounced in the domain of international entrepreneurship. The paper contributes to previous business model conceptualizations by adding the notion of value exchange at the company interfaces.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2003

David Deakins, Monder Ram, David Smallbone and Margaret Fletcher

This chapter is concerned with access to bank finance by ethnic minority businesses (EMBs) in the U.K., focusing particularly on the process of decision-making by bank…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with access to bank finance by ethnic minority businesses (EMBs) in the U.K., focusing particularly on the process of decision-making by bank managers with respect to credit applications by entrepreneurs from ethnic minority groups. The results reported in this chapter are taken from a major U.K. study that included two large scale surveys of EMB owners and a white control group, case studies with ethnic minority entrepreneurs and a programme of interviews with business support agencies. Whilst referring to other evidence, this chapter focuses on the findings from a series of interviews with bank representatives. The U.K. study was funded by the British Bankers’ Association (BBA), the Bank of England and the Small Business Service and supported by the Commission for Racial Equality.

Details

Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-220-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Simon Harris, Tom Forbes and Margaret Fletcher

The relevance of the planning approach for innovative and for young entrepreneurial firms had been subject to debate. It has been argued that planning dampens the…

Abstract

The relevance of the planning approach for innovative and for young entrepreneurial firms had been subject to debate. It has been argued that planning dampens the realisation of entrepreneurial vision. This study examines the enacted strategy approaches of entrepreneurs who had studied on a Graduate Enterprise programme that aimed to help them to start a business. The approaches they used to strategy formation were compared to the planning approach that had been emphasised to them seven to 12 years earlier. Data were gathered through non‐directive interviews, and were analysed using survey and case study methods. The formation of strategy by these entrepreneurs relied more on emergent than planning approaches, but some elements of the planning approach were strongly associated with growth. Some key resources were essential for the firms and their strategy formation processes. These were key personal relationships, with whom and through whom the entrepreneurs found ways of enacting their visions – the essence of their strategy process. Implications for curriculum and course development are given.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Margaret Charlton and Eric J. Dykstra

This paper aims to present preliminary findings regarding the types of adaptations made to dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and their effectiveness in working with a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present preliminary findings regarding the types of adaptations made to dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and their effectiveness in working with a population who have both intellectual disabilities and mental illnesses.

Design/methodology/approach

A pilot study conducted with adolescent clients in a day treatment program was completed in an effort to determine the effectiveness of dialectical behavior therapy for special populations (DBT‐SP). The study utilized all three components of DBT, in addition to the normal milieu management techniques. As such, clients received DBT‐SP focused individual therapy, skills training groups using the DBT‐SP skills training manual, and the whole treatment team staff participated in a DBT‐SP supervision/consultation group. Observations of client behavior by staff, client outcome when leaving the program, and daily diary card information was collected.

Findings

Although there are a number of issues that must be addressed when providing psychotherapy to individuals with intellectual disabilities and mental illnesses, many psychotherapeutic techniques are effective if they are suitably modified (Bütz et al., 2000; Nezu and Nezu, 1994) as has been found with DBT‐SP.

Research limitations/implications

As with most pilot studies, there are many limitations to the data. While each client serves as his/her own control, there is no random control group as all the youths receive DBT‐SP. Further, DBT‐SP is used in conjunction with other techniques and the study lacks the ability to control for any additional factors in the students' environment that may influence their behavior. In addition, clients enter and leave the program at different times, and so the data gathered can be hard to interpret. Thus, far, the data are suggestive, but not conclusive, regarding the effectiveness of DBT‐SP.

Originality/value

The information in this paper will be useful to therapists providing treatment to clients with intellectual disabilities and mental illnesses.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Margaret Fletcher

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Natasha Evers

Drawing on the dynamic capabilities perspective and the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm, this paper seeks to further understanding of international new ventures…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the dynamic capabilities perspective and the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm, this paper seeks to further understanding of international new ventures (INVs) operating in a traditional low technology sector – an understudied context in international entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory research merited qualitative research as the chosen methodology. Multiple case study design and critical incident technique were the main qualitative techniques employed.

Findings

The case entrepreneurs' objective and subjective capabilities emerge as a critical key resource for strategically managing and developing the dynamic capabilities of the firm in areas of research and development (R&D), logistics and production. The firms' capability to adapt and renew themselves through product diversification strategies was also critical for sustainable competitive advantage in a highly turbulent and competitive sector of seafood.

Research limitations/implications

The study is sector‐specific and, while the sample size is small, findings are consistent. The paper presents a conceptual research framework for exploring further dynamic capabilities theory across diverse empirical high and low‐tech industry contexts.

Practical implications

Low technology sectors are considered a “forgotten sector” of innovation policies in small‐developed economies. Findings from this study identify a number of important implications of relevance to policy‐makers and managers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge and understanding of how INVs in traditionally low‐tech sectors develop competitive advantage on international markets. The study presents an entrepreneurial perspective to the dynamic capabilities theory of the firm and presents a conceptual research framework to further understanding on INVs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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