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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Margaret Latshaw, Beth Harmon‐Vaughan and Bob Radford

With corporations reinventing and changing themselves with increasing frequency and speed, what is the real estate industry doing to enable that change? This paper…

Abstract

With corporations reinventing and changing themselves with increasing frequency and speed, what is the real estate industry doing to enable that change? This paper presents the perspectives of a corporate tenant, a developer and an interior designer to answer the question of what some companies are doing to make workspace more flexible and to shorten the cycle time for the processes by which workspace is constructed, procured and fitted‐out for new occupancy. The following questions will be answered ‐ In the low vacancy market prevalent in so many parts of the United States, what strategies are corporate real estate executives in high‐growth companies using to acquire space fast? ‐ What trends are emerging in the industry to streamline the processes to build, acquire, fit‐out and manage space? ‐ How is the industry changing its product to ensure that the space that is delivered can meet a variety of users and uses as occupants churn through the space in unforeseen ways?

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Jeanne Armstrong and Margaret Fast

Teaching research as a cognitive process rather than a set of skills and thereby ensuring critical thinking has been a concern of instructions librarians for some time…

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Abstract

Teaching research as a cognitive process rather than a set of skills and thereby ensuring critical thinking has been a concern of instructions librarians for some time. This article explains the design, rationale, and use of an innovative assignment, the encyclopedia entry, in a 200 level library credit course that targets sophomores and transfer students. At Western Washington University this course, “Library 201: Introduction to Research Strategies”, has historically required students to produce a free‐standing annotated bibliography. The encyclopedia entry assignment integrates “point of need” relevance into the course because the students choose sources that provide information which will actually be used in writing an encyclopedia entry.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Case study
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Fernando Leiva and Katherina Kuschel

The learning outcomes are as follows: business model pivot, minimum viable product, strategic alliances, return on equity and burn-rate.

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: business model pivot, minimum viable product, strategic alliances, return on equity and burn-rate.

Case overview/synopsis

HMSolution’s (HM’s) mission is removing arsenic from drinking water. The case tells how HMS pivoted its business model between 2014 and 2015 and its challenge when faced with several growth opportunities. The first possible partner company proposed adopting HMS’s technology through either an alliance or outsourcing. The second company wanted to acquire HMS. However, Margaret – the founder and CEO – managed to find a third option in the form of an important sanitation sewage treatment company in Chile with international presence, with which she could reach a wider territory in her country of origin, as well as in other countries where that company had a presence. This case study presents Margaret’s dilemma of deciding the best course to follow and finding the best fit for her product and the needs of the market.

Complexity academic level

The instructor can adapt the requirements and depth of the topics addressed, ranging from an undergraduate audience to an executive training audience. Undergraduate courses, namely, entrepreneurship, business creation, administration and strategy. For students of business careers, administration, commercial engineering, industrial civil engineering and industrial engineering. Continuous training, namely, entrepreneurship, business creation, administration and strategy.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Monika J.A. Schröder and Morven G. McEachern

Aims to investigate the effect of communicating corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives to young consumers in the UK on their fast‐food purchasing with reference…

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to investigate the effect of communicating corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives to young consumers in the UK on their fast‐food purchasing with reference to McDonald's and Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were conducted to clarify themes and inform a questionnaire on fast‐food purchasing behaviours and motives. Attitude statements were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis.

Findings

Most respondents (82 per cent) regularly purchased fast food from one of the companies; purchases were mostly impulsive (57 per cent) or routine (26 per cent), suggesting relatively low‐level involvement in each case. While there was scepticism regarding the CSR activity being promoted, expectations about socially responsible behaviour by the companies were nevertheless high. Four factors were isolated, together explaining 52 per cent of the variance in fast‐food purchasing behaviour. They were brand value, nutritional value, ethical value and food quality.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted with students, and while these represent a key‐target market, any further research should target a more diverse public.

Practical implications

There are important implications for global fast‐food companies in terms of protecting and developing their brand value; they need to respond to the wider food‐related debates in society, in particular, those concerning healthy eating and food ethics. They also need to ensure that their business practices are fully consistent with the values expressed in their CSR initiatives.

Originality/value

The special value of the paper lies in its joining together of current perspectives on CSR and consumer value in the UK food industry as it explores both through the perceptions of young consumers of fast food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Margaret Bruce and Lucy Daly

This paper seeks to address the complex nature of fast fashion buying through case studies with a supermarket, department store and own brand label. The phenomenon of fast

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to address the complex nature of fast fashion buying through case studies with a supermarket, department store and own brand label. The phenomenon of fast fashion raises questions about traditional approaches to sourcing and buying, which are addressed here.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies were compiled with companies managing fast fashion, alongside other purchase and retail activities, namely a supermarket, department store and specialist fashion chain.

Findings

Reveals the buying practices for fast fashion, namely, a combination of global and local suppliers, a leagile approach is typical; trust is an important factor in the supplier‐retailer relationship to ensure fast delivery at an agreed quality; and integration of key internal activities and processes to facilitate the speed of buying decisions that may be required.

Originality/value

Gives insight into the factors affecting buying behaviour for fast fashion.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Claire E.A. Seaman

Features the Fast Food Diner software program produced by British Meat and aimed at teachers and pupils studying Food Technology at Levels 3 and 4 of the National Curriculum.

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Abstract

Features the Fast Food Diner software program produced by British Meat and aimed at teachers and pupils studying Food Technology at Levels 3 and 4 of the National Curriculum.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Sandra Drummond, Terry Kirk and Anne de Looy

Snacking is commonly regarded by the general public as unhealthy,believing that it is more beneficial to stick to an eating pattern ofthree meals a day. Similarly anyone…

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Abstract

Snacking is commonly regarded by the general public as unhealthy, believing that it is more beneficial to stick to an eating pattern of three meals a day. Similarly anyone on a weight reduction programme will avoid snacks, reducing the frequency of eating occasions to two to three times a day. However there is evidence to suggest that snacking is not the evil once thought and individuals that snack throughout the day have positive advantages over individuals who conform to a rigid pattern of three meals a day. Increasingly western populations appear to be moving away from the “gorging” to the “nibbling” pattern of eating, probably as a direct result of the increased availability of fast foods and snacks. Reviews the literature in the area of snacking and frequency of eating with respect to energy and nutrient intakes, body weight, body composition and energy balance and indicates the direction for further research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Anghel N. Rugina

The equation of unified knowledge says that S = f (A,P) which means that the practical solution to a given problem is a function of the existing, empirical, actual…

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Abstract

The equation of unified knowledge says that S = f (A,P) which means that the practical solution to a given problem is a function of the existing, empirical, actual realities and the future, potential, best possible conditions of general stable equilibrium which both pure and practical reason, exhaustive in the Kantian sense, show as being within the realm of potential realities beyond any doubt. The first classical revolution in economic thinking, included in factor “P” of the equation, conceived the economic and financial problems in terms of a model of ideal conditions of stable equilibrium but neglected the full consideration of the existing, actual conditions. That is the main reason why, in the end, it failed. The second modern revolution, included in factor “A” of the equation, conceived the economic and financial problems in terms of the existing, actual conditions, usually in disequilibrium or unstable equilibrium (in case of stagnation) and neglected the sense of right direction expressed in factor “P” or the realization of general, stable equilibrium. That is the main reason why the modern revolution failed in the past and is failing in front of our eyes in the present. The equation of unified knowledge, perceived as a sui generis synthesis between classical and modern thinking has been applied rigorously and systematically in writing the enclosed American‐British economic, monetary, financial and social stabilization plans. In the final analysis, a new economic philosophy, based on a synthesis between classical and modern thinking, called here the new economics of unified knowledge, is applied to solve the malaise of the twentieth century which resulted from a confusion between thinking in terms of stable equilibrium on the one hand and disequilibrium or unstable equilibrium on the other.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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