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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Clare Margaret Crowley, Gabriela McMahon, Joanna Desmond and Mendinaro Imcha

To implement a safe and effective intravenous iron infusion protocol to prevent skin staining.

Abstract

Purpose

To implement a safe and effective intravenous iron infusion protocol to prevent skin staining.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods approach was utilised including education, auditing, self-reported survey, patient information leaflet and patient feedback. In total 25 healthcare professionals completed the survey and 15 patients provided feedback.

Findings

No skin staining or severe adverse reactions were observed over eight weeks. Audit results found 53 per cent of staff were compliant with the recommended IV iron infusion protocol and 46 per cent informed patients of skin staining risk. Self-report surveys indicated 92 per cent flushed the cannula with sodium chloride before starting the infusion, 88 per cent flushed the cannula after the infusion and 76 per cent informed patients of skin staining risk. Patient feedback was largely positive and constructive.

Research limitations

Limitations include self-reported bias, short audit time interval, missing data and discrepancy between audit and survey results.

Originality/value

This quality improvement project was developed following two skin staining incidences at our maternity hospital. Although rare, skin staining after intravenous iron infusion is potentially permanent and may be distressing for some patients. Intravenous iron is considered safe and effective to treat anaemia during pregnancy and is often prescribed for this patient cohort. To avoid medicolegal action and patient dissatisfaction, it is essential that patients are informed of potential skin staining and an evidence-based administration protocol is utilised.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Catherine R. Smith, Margaret Crowley and Jacquie Hutchinson

For the last ten years there has been substantial encouragement forwomen to broaden their career horizons and enter into non‐traditionalareas of work. In the mining…

Abstract

For the last ten years there has been substantial encouragement for women to broaden their career horizons and enter into non‐traditional areas of work. In the mining industry in particular, women now work as geologists, surveyors, mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, environmental scientists, chemical engineers, and production workers, in some of the most remote and hostile locations in Australia. Given the strategic role of the mining industry within the Australian economy, and the resources which individuals, organizations and governments have already invested in training and development, one would expect that these women could look forward to a long and productive future in the industry. Instead, many younger women in particular are considering leaving the industry. In 1991 Commonwealth funding was made available by WREIP for a research project on women in mining. Based on data derived from a workshop based on this research, this article examines the reasons why women are considering deserting a workplace which they strove so hard to enter. It considers issues such as the implications of ineffective management practices, particularly within the context of career development; the implications of management failure to acknowledge the “genderedness” of organizations; and the limitations of current equal employment opportunity and affirmative action legislation to produce the necessary structural and attitudinal changes.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Volume 8 Number 5 of Women in Management Review contains three articles. In the first, entitled “Gender Effects in Salary Increases: A Shifting Pendulum?” by Kenneth W…

Abstract

Volume 8 Number 5 of Women in Management Review contains three articles. In the first, entitled “Gender Effects in Salary Increases: A Shifting Pendulum?” by Kenneth W. Thornicroft, the author maintains that a large number of studies suggest that in experimental reward allocation scenarios, females tend to under‐reward themselves vis‐a‐vis similarly situated males. However, the principal studies date from the 1970s and early 1980s. In the past decade there has been a substantial public policy effort, reflected in employment equity legislation and organisation‐level initiatives, targeting direct and systemic gen‐der‐based discriminatory practices. There is some evidence that gender‐ based discriminatory employment practices are receding. In this study, involving 127 undergraduate business administration students, the student allocator's gender was not a significant predictor of reward allocation behaviour. Even more provocative, the results suggest that a reward allocation bias systematically operated in favour of women.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Current issues of Publishers' Weekly are reporting serious shortages of paper, binders board, cloth, and other essential book manufacturing materials. Let us assure you…

Abstract

Current issues of Publishers' Weekly are reporting serious shortages of paper, binders board, cloth, and other essential book manufacturing materials. Let us assure you these shortages are very real and quite severe.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Luis Alfonso Dau, Elizabeth Marie Moore and Margaret Soto

The purpose of this chapter is to examine how multinational firms have an added incentive to promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) in order to maximize…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to examine how multinational firms have an added incentive to promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) in order to maximize profitability and adapt to the changing normative climate in a post Great Recession economy.

Methodology/approach

This chapter builds on institutional theory using contextual evidence from Mexican firms to provide insight into the varying pressures facing local and multinational enterprises in emerging markets.

Findings

This chapter highlights different sets of pressures faced by emerging market firms, both domestic and multinational. This chapter contends that emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) are incentivized to uphold CSR practices to a greater degree than domestic firms from emerging markets.

Research limitations

Contextual evidence for this chapter was confined to Mexican firms, which provides an opportunity for future research to be carried out from alternative emerging markets.

Social and practical implications

From a social standpoint, this chapter sheds light on the challenges of globalization and the current rift between national level policies, coinciding behavior, and global expectations. From a practical standpoint, this chapter could inform and alert CEOs and practitioners to the nuances of CSR expectations, contingent upon the sphere in which they choose to operate in.

Originality/value

This chapter contributes to the growing dialogue on EMNEs while highlighting the schism between national and global expectations for CSR. Further, this chapter adds to the literature on institutional theory by connecting it to the in-group and out-group literature from sociology.

Details

Lessons from the Great Recession: At the Crossroads of Sustainability and Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-743-1

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-615-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Geoffrey N. Soutar, Margaret M. McNeil and Kwee Lim

The paper examines the perceptions of overseas' students of the service quality delivered by 10 educational institutions in Western Australia. Their expectations in…

Abstract

The paper examines the perceptions of overseas' students of the service quality delivered by 10 educational institutions in Western Australia. Their expectations in relation to service quality are also measured using the SERVQUAL model. Groups of students with distinct expectations are identified and these groups are plotted on a perceptual space diagram together with the 10 institutions. This provides a useful tool for market segmentation and diagnostic work to improve service quality dimensions.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Margaret Burnette

This study aims to explore the nature of tacit knowledge (TK) sharing among library colleagues, with a focus on the characteristics of TK and contextual factors such as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the nature of tacit knowledge (TK) sharing among library colleagues, with a focus on the characteristics of TK and contextual factors such as organizational culture or the mentor/mentee relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a critical incident approach, participants self-selected based on pre-established criteria to report knowledge sharing incidents between colleagues at either an in-person or virtual reference desk. Subsequent semi-structured interviews were transcribed from recordings and coded for thematic elements.

Findings

Three thematic areas emerged. First are the influence of organizational culture and the importance of trust on knowledge sharing behavior. Second, the value of teamwork and the significance of mentor/mentee roles surface as significant drivers of TK exchange. Last but not least is a better understanding of the nature of TK, as it relates to types of knowledge and characterizations of experience and expertise.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively small sample size nevertheless revealed some important findings that contribute to the understanding of the role of TK sharing in libraries.

Originality/value

The value of knowledge sharing in libraries is not well understood. This study demonstrates the value on several levels, including the influence of culture and trust, and the power of mentoring to harness TK held by experts. The proposed Tacit Knowledge Alignment Framework contributes to the understanding of the nature of TK in libraries. These findings begin to fill a research gap by furthering our understanding of TK and informing future retention efforts that are lacking in many libraries.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Tanya Fitzgerald and Sally Knipe

Abstract

Details

Historical Perspectives on Teacher Preparation in Aotearoa New Zealand
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-640-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Margaret Patrickson and Rob Ranzijn

Australia, together with most other developed and developing countries, faces a difficult demographic pattern in the first half of the twenty‐first century, due to a low…

Abstract

Australia, together with most other developed and developing countries, faces a difficult demographic pattern in the first half of the twenty‐first century, due to a low and declining birth rate and an ageing population. This has led to an ageing workforce, with a relative shortage of younger entrants. One issue for government is what further steps they could initiate to persuade more people to remain in the labour force beyond the currently median retiring age of around 55 years. Employers will need to consider the degree to which they are prepared to reverse present negative attitudes towards employment of older staff, and workers need to resolve whether they need or desire to keep working and under what conditions. Boundaries constructed by government policy and employer actions, and their resolution by older individuals, form the content of this paper. The paper concludes that employers now face the management of up to four generational groups and resolving their intergenerational differences will present as a major future challenge. Revisiting practices for managing older workers will be essential and the paper offers suggestions for employers towards more effective utilisation of their older staff and more effective integration of workers of all age groups.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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