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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Peter Murray and Maree Moses

The purpose of this paper is to provide a greater understanding of the role of team learning by examining the link between team centrality and organisational learning.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a greater understanding of the role of team learning by examining the link between team centrality and organisational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual paper that examines a range of literature related to team learning. It is the first paper in a series of three. The final paper examines the propositions developed in this and a subsequent paper by exploring team learning in over 30 large companies across a range of industries. Team processes are all but defined by pre‐existing organisational processes. At one extreme, they are directive and driven. At another, they are dynamic and fluid and underlie a degree of self‐managed activity. Team processes accordingly are potentially dynamic or rather basic depending on the level of structured or unstructured activity. The paper suggests that potentially dynamic teams are those that display superior learning routines that are embodied within each team's processes. This paper contends that team learning is a centrally located variable within organisational learning processes.

Findings

To date, team characteristics, team building, and team structures have been the focus of much research, but team learning routines have been underplayed in the team's literature. Teams are central in the organisational learning process.

Practical implications

This paper establishes the theoretical underpinning for a final paper that will make significant recommendations. There are practical implications, however, of various links across the themes, particularly the centrality of the team in the learning process.

Originality/value

This paper is a highly valuable due to very little research being completed to date on this topic.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Terri R. Lituchy, David Ford and Betty Jane Punnett

The purpose of this paper is to consider effective leadership in Africa and the African diaspora. This paper reports the results of emic research in Uganda, Barbados…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider effective leadership in Africa and the African diaspora. This paper reports the results of emic research in Uganda, Barbados, Canada and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi technique using open‐ended questions solicited ideas regarding leadership from knowledgeable participants, avoiding researcher bias.

Findings

There were differences among the groups on several attributes that made leaders effective. Ugandans suggested a good leader was “honest and trustworthy”; Canadians and respondents from the USA said “being inspirational/charismatic” Barbadians cited “being a visionary”.

Research limitations/implications

Having data for only one African country and the small sample sizes from all countries limit the generalizability of the findings. The results do, however, provide a base of knowledge on which to build future studies on Africa and the diaspora.

Originality/value

The emic approach overcomes the western bias identified by scholars in most African research. Similarities and differences identified provide evidence of the importance of culture in effective leadership. The results provide a basis for developing further research studies.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Abstract

Details

Applied Ethics in the Fractured State
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-600-6

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2017

Leah Watkins, Robert Aitken, Maree Thyne, Kirsten Robertson and Dina Borzekowski

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors influencing young children’s (aged three to five years) understanding of brand symbolism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors influencing young children’s (aged three to five years) understanding of brand symbolism.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple hierarchical regression was used to analyse the relationships between age, gender and environmental factors, including family and the media, on the development of brand symbolism in pre-school children based on 56 children and parent dyad interviews.

Findings

Results confirmed the primary influence of age, television exposure and parental communication style on three to five-year-old children’s understanding of brand symbolism. The study demonstrates that the tendency to infer symbolic user attributes and non-product-related associations with brands starts as early as two years, and increases with age throughout the pre-school years. Children exposed to more television and less critical parental consumer socialisation strategies are more likely to prefer branded products, believe that brands are better quality and that they make people happy and popular.

Social implications

Identifying the factors that influence the development of symbolic brand associations in pre-school children provides an important contribution to public policy discussions on the impact of marketing to young children.

Originality/value

The paper extends existing research by considering, for the first time, the role of environmental factors in pre-schooler’s understanding of brand symbolism. The results provide a more informed basis for discussion about the impact of marketing messages on very young children and the environmental factors that may lead to a more critical engagement with brands.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Bev Orton

Abstract

Details

Women, Activism and Apartheid South Africa: Using Play Texts to Document the Herstory of South Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-526-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1923

Circular 381 MINISTRY OF HEALTH, Whitehall, S.W. 1. 20th March, 1923. I am directed by the Minister of Health to state that he has received communications from a number of…

Abstract

Circular 381 MINISTRY OF HEALTH, Whitehall, S.W. 1. 20th March, 1923. I am directed by the Minister of Health to state that he has received communications from a number of local authorities with regard to the presence of boric acid in cake, some samples (especially of sponge cake) having been found to contain a somewhat high proportion of this preservative.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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