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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Geoff Dickens, Philip Sugarman, Marco Picchioni and Clive Long

In this study we demonstrate how the Health of the Nation Outcomes Scales for secure and forensic service users (HoNOS‐secure) tracks risk and recovery in men with mental…

Abstract

In this study we demonstrate how the Health of the Nation Outcomes Scales for secure and forensic service users (HoNOS‐secure) tracks risk and recovery in men with mental illness and men with learning disability in a secure care pathway. Total and individual HoNOS‐secure item ratings made by multi‐disciplinary teams across the course of a period of admission (mean 15 months) for 180 men were examined. There was significant positive change on the clinical and risk‐related scales of HoNOS‐secure for patients in the learning disability care pathway (N = 48) between initial and final ratings. In the mental health care pathway (N = 132 patients) an apparent lack of change masked a more complex picture, where initial decline in HoNOS‐secure ratings was succeeded by significant improvement. Results suggest that it is challenging to measure clinical and risk‐related medium‐term clinical outcomes objectively for these patients, particularly in relation to core issues of treatment of mental disorder, and reduction of both problem behaviour and risk to others. However, it is important that practitioners continue to strive to demonstrate the benefits of care and treatment through appropriate outcomes measures.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Camilla Haw, Ayesha Muthu-Veloe, Mark Suett, Oghodafetite Ibodor and Marco Picchioni

The purpose of this paper is to describe a completed audit cycle of the assessment and documentation of antipsychotic side effects reported by patients in a secure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a completed audit cycle of the assessment and documentation of antipsychotic side effects reported by patients in a secure hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The initial audit was carried out in 2012. As a result of the findings clinicians were recommended to use a brief structured side effect monitoring guide (the Glasgow Antipsychotic Side-Effect Scale (GASS-m)). The audit was repeated in 2015.

Findings

Of the 41 patients notes included in the initial audit, for only one (2.4 per cent) was there evidence of a systematic and structured approach to monitoring antipsychotic side effects. In the repeat audit this figure (and use of the GASS-m) had increased to 21/45 (46.7 per cent). For all patients where the GASS-m had been used (n=21) the overall severity of side effects was in the “mild” range (0-21).

Research limitations/implications

Sample size was modest and the study was conducted in an independent secure hospital so may not be generalisable to the NHS.

Practical implications

Use of structured tools/guides to monitor patients’ side effects is recommended so that emergent side effects can be readily recognised, tracked and managed and, relapses made less likely through improved compliance and thus patients’ quality of life improved. This is very important for forensic patients since relapses are likely to increase risk to others.

Originality/value

Previous audits have addressed physical health monitoring of patients on antipsychotics but not by asking them about side effects.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Geoff Dickens, Marco Picchioni and Clive Long

The purpose of this paper is to describe how aggressive and violent incidents differ across specialist gender, security and mental health/learning disability pathways in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how aggressive and violent incidents differ across specialist gender, security and mental health/learning disability pathways in specialist secure care.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a retrospective survey of routinely collected incident data from one 207‐bed UK independent sector provider of specialist medium and low secure mental health care for male and female adults with primary diagnosis of mental illness or intellectual disability.

Findings

In total, 3,133 incidents involving 184/373 (49.3 per cent) patients were recorded (68.2 per cent other‐directed aggression, 31.8 per cent self‐harm). Most incidents occurred in the medium secure wards but more than half of the most severely rated self‐harm incidents occurred in low security. Men were disproportionately involved in incidents, but a small number of women were persistently involved in multiple acts. Incidents were most common in the intellectual disability pathway.

Research limitations/implications

Incidents, especially those of lower severity, can be under‐reported in routine practice. Information about incident severity was limited.

Practical implications

Aggressive incidents do not occur homogenously across forensic and secure mental health services but differ substantially in their frequency and nature across security levels, and gender and mental health/intellectual disability pathways. Different approaches to training and management are required to ensure appropriate prevention and intervention. Future practice should draw on emerging theories of differential susceptibility.

Originality/value

This paper extends current knowledge about how incidents of violence and aggression differ across secure settings.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Carol Ireland and Neil Gredecki

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Carol A. Ireland and Neil Gredecki

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Abstract

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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